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Old 05-19-2015, 04:59 PM   #21
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Evergreen - this certainly seemed to happen in my father's time period but most of these men had no hobbies or interests other than working and watching TV.
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Old 05-19-2015, 05:14 PM   #22
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We had the "scare" 25+ years ago.
Walked away with a helluva lot less, to the happiest time of our lives.
You only come this way once.
Sharing 23 years of Frugal Retirement

Think on it.
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Old 05-19-2015, 07:30 PM   #23
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Evergreen,

The reason my brother retired was that he had been ill, gravely so. He went into remission for a year then it came back with a vengeance and he was gone. Yeah 53. I miss him. Time is precious.

Let me tell you another story about my uncle - he is ninety. his girlfriend is in her 80s. They travel, they live and he just jumped out of an airplane - yeah with a parachute. They are a delight to be with. They don't talk about dying they talk and plan about on summering on the peninsula. They are role models I am doing my best to learn from them.... We all can.


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Old 05-20-2015, 01:34 PM   #24
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Thankfully I'm in good health for a 52 year old man, need to lose about 10lbs in weight though, my finances are there. I've been frugal all of my working life. Why the heck am I still working?! Maybe I'm still paying too much attention to what others think, all telling me that I'm too young and that it is not good to throw away a decent salary. Not one word of encouragement. The old clock is ticking though and I want to enjoy the next 30 odd years (God willing).


Still hoping to hand that letter over late summer.
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Old 05-20-2015, 01:42 PM   #25
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Can you change the work situation to slow down? Fewer days, later arrival time, etc?
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Old 05-20-2015, 02:05 PM   #26
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I keep reading these stories about people retiring early and dying soon after, can it really be that bad?! It is actually bugging me as I plan to pull the plug sometime late summer.

I can't point to any studies (surely someone else here can), but perhaps in a lot of cases those folks already had health issues which contributed to them seeking retirement. I also speculate that in cases where the retirement is forced and not by choice, and the person valued themselves in terms of their job/career, it can lead to depression and the onset of related health issues to shorten ones life.

Anecdotally, I knew 3 folks I worked with to whom this happened, but all had major health issues before retiring. OTOH, I know many more who have been retired 5-20+ years and are still healthy and doing well.
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Old 05-20-2015, 05:19 PM   #27
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Can you change the work situation to slow down? Fewer days, later arrival time, etc?

I've noticed I'm not as quick out of the gate these days...
I linger longer over that cup of coffee, casually get dressed... The snap in my step has gone.

My old dog raises his head when the mail persons truck pulls up... There was a time she would run over for a treat...she looks, sighs and puts her head back down... Wow that's me too.

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Old 05-20-2015, 05:36 PM   #28
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I've noticed I'm not as quick out of the gate these days...
I linger longer over that cup of coffee, casually get dressed... The snap in my step has gone.

My old dog raises his head when the mail persons truck pulls up... There was a time she would run over for a treat...she looks, sighs and puts her head back down... Wow that's me too.

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The writer Bob Greene had columns in one of the major Chicago newspapers I liked. He had this continuing series called (I think) "Bagtime". It was about a man working as a bag boy at the local market in the area, his experiences. One column I thought was very touching was about his cat Helen, who had been with him throughout his days as a newlywed and still lived with him after his divorce. Helen experienced the same behavior changes over time, in her case it was eagerness to get to her bowl of food. Greene wrote something like, "you think things will always stay the same, but they never do".

I tore that column out and still have it somewhere. That one was titled something like, "A Life Creeps By On Little Cat Feet".
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Old 05-21-2015, 02:02 AM   #29
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I can't change my work hours schedule as I'm on a final salary pension scheme. I ought to start looking for something part time that I can step into to make the change less abrupt. I'd rather not work at all though, done 35 years straight now.
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Old 05-21-2015, 08:24 AM   #30
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I keep reading these stories about people retiring early and dying soon after, can it really be that bad?! It is actually bugging me as I plan to pull the plug sometime late summer.
I hear that too, but I think in many cases, these people were already in failing health, and would have died whether they kept working or not.

Another one I've often heard is that when one spouse dies, the other usually goes within a year. In my limited personal experience though, that seems to be the exception rather than the rule. Now, here at work, about 20 years ago, I remember a husband and wife where that did hold true. However, the wife was very sick, and forced to retire. After she passed away, the husband was lonely and depressed, and shot himself. So yeah, he did die within a year of his wife's passing, but he did it himself...it's not like he just mentally gave up and his body shut down. He mentally gave up and took his own life.

My maternal grandmother just passed away on May 11, at the age of 91. However, Granddad passed away on April 25, 1990, so she made it another 25 years. As for their respective retirements, Granddad had retired at 55 in 1971, so he lasted 19 years (lung cancer). Grandmom "officially" retired in 1980 at the age of 56 when the gov't hospital she worked at shut down, and she was able to get a pension, but she worked off and on, out of the home, and doing part time/on call work at other hospitals, until 1994, when she turned 70. So I guess her "semi-retirement" was 13 years (it was late 1980 and early 1994, respectively, so I'm rounding, rather than doing sloppy math). And her "full" retirement was 21 years (1994-2015). Grandmom and Granddad got married in 1946, so they were together 43 years.

On my Dad's side, Grandmom died in 1994, at the age of 73. Granddad is still kicking, at 100, but I don't think he's going to last much longer. His body actually looks pretty good for his age, but his mind is going fast. So in their case, he's gone on 21 years without her. As for their retirement, they both went out in 1974, when Granddad turned 60 and retired from the Pennsylvania Railroad. Grandmom worked in the office at another railroad called "Fruit Grower's" or something like that. Grandmom would've only been around 53, but might have put in enough time to get some kind of pension. Or maybe Granddad's was good enough that they could just make it on only one? So anyway, their retirement together lasted another 20 years. And then Granddad's lasted almost another 21 beyond that!

Oh yeah, while we were at the cemetery this past Saturday, I noticed the site of my grandmother's (back to the Mom's side) Uncle Luther and Aunt Carrie. Uncle Luther was 1889-1960, so he made it to 70/71, and Aunt Carrie was 1886-1969, so she made it to 82/83. I don't know much about their work history, except that Uncle Luther worked for the federal gov't as a carpenter. And he and Aunt Carrie also ran a little country store, starting in 1916. I don't know what year he retired, and nobody around here remembers when the store shut down. I've heard sometime in the 40's or maybe early 50's, at the latest. Uncle Luther sort of went crazy in his older age. And after he died, Aunt Carrie lived with Grandmom and Granddad.

Oh, one other data point. My grandmother's cousin, who turned 90 back in October. She retired from the federal gov't around 1980-81 around the age of 56 or so. She had divorced, back in the 1950's I think, so there was no husband However, she had a boyfriend (or "gentleman friend" I guess you'd call it at that age!) He had passed away in 2001 or so. I don't know how long they had been together, but it was before I was born, so at least 31 years, so I'm sure that loss would be as rough as losing a husband/wife. Still, here it is, 14 years later, and she's doing pretty well, for her age.

Anyway, sorry for all this rambling on, but I just wanted to paint a rosier picture, with examples of people who retired and didn't drop dead within a year or two! And, spouses who lived fairly long after the other had passed on.
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Old 05-21-2015, 10:00 AM   #31
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I keep reading these stories about people retiring early and dying soon after, can it really be that bad?! It is actually bugging me as I plan to pull the plug sometime late summer.
Yes it really is! Retirement is the leading cause of death in the developed world. In OECD countries, 97% of people who died were retired.*












*Need somebody to pay taxes/SS.
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Old 05-21-2015, 12:53 PM   #32
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I hear that too, but I think in many cases, these people were already in failing health, and would have died whether they kept working or not.

Another one I've often heard is that when one spouse dies, the other usually goes within a year. In my limited personal experience though, that seems to be the exception rather than the rule. Now, here at work, about 20 years ago, I remember a husband and wife where that did hold true. However, the wife was very sick, and forced to retire. After she passed away, the husband was lonely and depressed, and shot himself. So yeah, he did die within a year of his wife's passing, but he did it himself...it's not like he just mentally gave up and his body shut down. He mentally gave up and took his own life.

My maternal grandmother just passed away on May 11, at the age of 91. However, Granddad passed away on April 25, 1990, so she made it another 25 years. As for their respective retirements, Granddad had retired at 55 in 1971, so he lasted 19 years (lung cancer). Grandmom "officially" retired in 1980 at the age of 56 when the gov't hospital she worked at shut down, and she was able to get a pension, but she worked off and on, out of the home, and doing part time/on call work at other hospitals, until 1994, when she turned 70. So I guess her "semi-retirement" was 13 years (it was late 1980 and early 1994, respectively, so I'm rounding, rather than doing sloppy math). And her "full" retirement was 21 years (1994-2015). Grandmom and Granddad got married in 1946, so they were together 43 years.

On my Dad's side, Grandmom died in 1994, at the age of 73. Granddad is still kicking, at 100, but I don't think he's going to last much longer. His body actually looks pretty good for his age, but his mind is going fast. So in their case, he's gone on 21 years without her. As for their retirement, they both went out in 1974, when Granddad turned 60 and retired from the Pennsylvania Railroad. Grandmom worked in the office at another railroad called "Fruit Grower's" or something like that. Grandmom would've only been around 53, but might have put in enough time to get some kind of pension. Or maybe Granddad's was good enough that they could just make it on only one? So anyway, their retirement together lasted another 20 years. And then Granddad's lasted almost another 21 beyond that!

Oh yeah, while we were at the cemetery this past Saturday, I noticed the site of my grandmother's (back to the Mom's side) Uncle Luther and Aunt Carrie. Uncle Luther was 1889-1960, so he made it to 70/71, and Aunt Carrie was 1886-1969, so she made it to 82/83. I don't know much about their work history, except that Uncle Luther worked for the federal gov't as a carpenter. And he and Aunt Carrie also ran a little country store, starting in 1916. I don't know what year he retired, and nobody around here remembers when the store shut down. I've heard sometime in the 40's or maybe early 50's, at the latest. Uncle Luther sort of went crazy in his older age. And after he died, Aunt Carrie lived with Grandmom and Granddad.

Oh, one other data point. My grandmother's cousin, who turned 90 back in October. She retired from the federal gov't around 1980-81 around the age of 56 or so. She had divorced, back in the 1950's I think, so there was no husband However, she had a boyfriend (or "gentleman friend" I guess you'd call it at that age!) He had passed away in 2001 or so. I don't know how long they had been together, but it was before I was born, so at least 31 years, so I'm sure that loss would be as rough as losing a husband/wife. Still, here it is, 14 years later, and she's doing pretty well, for her age.

Anyway, sorry for all this rambling on, but I just wanted to paint a rosier picture, with examples of people who retired and didn't drop dead within a year or two! And, spouses who lived fairly long after the other had passed on.

Nice post, I actually think that the people who say if you retire early you are likely to die early are just plain jealous!
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Old 05-21-2015, 02:18 PM   #33
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Exactly Evergreen. The question I am asked a lot is - don't you get bored? As if working was the only thing I ever had going in my life.
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Old 05-22-2015, 11:11 PM   #34
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I do have friends, aquaintences and co workers that have gone way, way too early. I also have some still living that hate work, already have a lot but want MORE so stay working! The worst in my mind are those that have had strokes at a fairly early age. Horrible way to be! I do think it takes a bit to get use to which I haven't yet.
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Old 05-23-2015, 05:23 AM   #35
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I'm a fishing rod lawn chair and bucket kind of guy. The mrs keeps it simple too...



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Why don't you want to retire?

What would you retire to?
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Old 05-24-2015, 04:20 AM   #36
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If you are pretty sure you will need the knee replacement, you should think about doing this while you are still working, for the following reasons:

1. you will be covered under your employer's medical plan.
2. you can use your sick leave ( I would think you have a ton of it). Knee replacement recovery can take up to 2-3 months (sometimes less if your job is sedentary). This way it is a payed retirement trial.
3. you will be off of work during this time and can use it as a sort of trial retirement. Knee rehab. can be labor intensive, so it is not like you will have nothing to do. You may find you do not miss work at all. Or you may feel the opposite.
4. Once you recover from the knee surgery. You may find that activities that you could not do before are suddenly doable. This might change your attitude to work as now you have energy do things outside of work.

Once you are passed all the knee/health issues you may still feel like you want to retire. This way it may clarify what you want to do. FWIW.
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Old 05-24-2015, 08:32 AM   #37
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I'm often asked what will I retire to? To be honest I will retire to do what ever I damn well please, the thought of being able to do what I want for the rest of my life sounds amazing! I've done all the education and 35 years full time work, it is time to have some fun!
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Old 05-24-2015, 09:20 AM   #38
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If you are pretty sure you will need the knee replacement, you should think about doing this while you are still working, for the following reasons:



1. you will be covered under your employer's medical plan.

2. you can use your sick leave ( I would think you have a ton of it). Knee replacement recovery can take up to 2-3 months (sometimes less if your job is sedentary). This way it is a payed retirement trial.

3. you will be off of work during this time and can use it as a sort of trial retirement. Knee rehab. can be labor intensive, so it is not like you will have nothing to do. You may find you do not miss work at all. Or you may feel the opposite.

4. Once you recover from the knee surgery. You may find that activities that you could not do before are suddenly doable. This might change your attitude to work as now you have energy do things outside of work.



Once you are passed all the knee/health issues you may still feel like you want to retire. This way it may clarify what you want to do. FWIW.

Thanks... I'm I've decided to lose another 25lbs and then do the surgery... Go on disability for as long as possible then retire...



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Old 05-25-2015, 10:44 AM   #39
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Thanks... I'm I've decided to lose another 25lbs and then do the surgery... Go on disability for as long as possible then retire...
Congratulations on making the decision. It's a tough one. Now your job is to avoid catching One More Year (OMY) syndrome !
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