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Old 07-10-2015, 09:50 AM   #21
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Who pays for the fraudulent charges? Some bum buys a $400 flatscreen TV with your card number, and takes it home and starts watching Opra. You report it, credit card company takes it off your bill. Then does credit card company refuse to pay the store that sold the TV? Or does credit card company just pay the $400 to the store, and take the hit?
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Old 07-10-2015, 10:13 AM   #22
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I had a credit card number stolen a couple of months ago...still had the actual card but somehow they were using my number. The cardholder contacted me because of suspicious charges. Apparently, whoever had this card number was on a Vegas vacation...but not a very high end vacation. They were eating at Denny's and staying at Motel 6.


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Old 07-10-2015, 11:37 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by John Galt III View Post
Who pays for the fraudulent charges? Some bum buys a $400 flatscreen TV with your card number, and takes it home and starts watching Opra. You report it, credit card company takes it off your bill. Then does credit card company refuse to pay the store that sold the TV? Or does credit card company just pay the $400 to the store, and take the hit?
CC card first, then they contact the merchant. Sometimes the merchant does reimburse. I lived every painful part of the process. My fourth call was to deal with the CC company changing me back almost 1k, there were double credits over the prior couple months so I did owe them the money.
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Old 07-10-2015, 12:10 PM   #24
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I've kept some of these numbers on a fake phone list, and you can do that on paper and/or your phone directory. For a 4 # PIN or CVC for a Fidelity AMEX card for example, something like:

Uncle Fred - 312-456-1234 where the 1234 is the pin/CVC

or the 3 digit for the Visa

Aunt Vicky - 312-456-0123

It's obvious to me, as I don't have an Uncle Fred or Aunt Vicky, and the F and V are good enough reminders for me. And still pretty secure.

-ERD50
Thanks for this tip. I will definitely use this. I learn something new on this forum almost every time I'm here...
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Old 07-10-2015, 12:13 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by John Galt III View Post
Who pays for the fraudulent charges? Some bum buys a $400 flatscreen TV with your card number, and takes it home and starts watching Opra. You report it, credit card company takes it off your bill. Then does credit card company refuse to pay the store that sold the TV? Or does credit card company just pay the $400 to the store, and take the hit?
I just heard on the radio this morning that the liability is going to shift soon (I believe early next year?) to the merchants if they aren't compliant with the new security measures (which I believe means chip and PIN). The banker talking about it seemed pretty excited about the change.
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Old 07-10-2015, 01:15 PM   #26
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Several years ago DD charged her wedding reception at a top San Jose Hotel on her credit card. Later in the day she used the CC a car wash. When we returned from last minute shopping at Nordstrom's the CC called to ask if she REALLY charged something at Ward's. The charge wasn't large, probably testing to see if the # worked. Boy did we tease her - even the CC issuer knew her shopping habits! Panic quickly set in when she realized that they were planning to use that card on their honeymoon. CC issuer arranged for her to go to their affiliated bank for a replacement card immediately.
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Old 07-10-2015, 06:04 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by John Galt III View Post
Who pays for the fraudulent charges? Some bum buys a $400 flatscreen TV with your card number, and takes it home and starts watching Opra. You report it, credit card company takes it off your bill. Then does credit card company refuse to pay the store that sold the TV? Or does credit card company just pay the $400 to the store, and take the hit?
I've been out of it (fraud investigation) for over a decade now but then it was merchant first, then CC co. if the merchant was out of business. That's one reason a merchant's account can be (or was then anyway) difficult to get.

If the merchant followed all the rules - physical card present at point of sale and a signature on the dotted line, then the CC co. would take the loss. Online sales, phone orders, etc. the merchant takes the hit.
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Old 07-10-2015, 06:21 PM   #28
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My corporate card got hit with purchases in California even tho I had card in hand. A purse from Gucci followed by meals at jack in the box. Really, gonna go to jail for jack in the box??
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Old 07-19-2015, 10:58 AM   #29
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It seems this is an Online service in the Country of Moldova.
Off topic: The cliffhanger episode of Dynasty's fifth season is known as the 'Moldovian Massacre'. I know this only because a friend married a woman from Moldova, then found out many people didn't believe them because the Dynasty writers made up that name. It didn't help their credibility when one explained they met at Dracula's Castle.
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Old 07-19-2015, 05:51 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by ERD50 View Post
I've kept some of these numbers on a fake phone list, and you can do that on paper and/or your phone directory. For a 4 # PIN or CVC for a Fidelity AMEX card for example, something like:

Uncle Fred - 312-456-1234 where the 1234 is the pin/CVC

or the 3 digit for the Visa

Aunt Vicky - 312-456-0123

It's obvious to me, as I don't have an Uncle Fred or Aunt Vicky, and the F and V are good enough reminders for me. And still pretty secure.

-ERD50
I just got a call from Aunt Vicky and she is pissed about all the calls she is getting.
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Old 07-19-2015, 06:32 PM   #31
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One idea for pins is to use old numbers from addresses from the 1970s or earlier your own or your parents/grandparents. These won't be online and are likley easier to remember.
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Old 07-19-2015, 10:38 PM   #32
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I just got a call from Aunt Vicky and she is pissed about all the calls she is getting.
I should have been more careful with those example numbers. My apologies.

Chicago | Offices | Gensler

CONTACT
11 East Madison Street
Suite 300
Chicago, IL 60602
USA
Tel: +1 312.456.0123

But now we know where your Aunt Vicky works!

-ERD50
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Old 07-19-2015, 10:49 PM   #33
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My favorite fraudulent charge was last week on my Chase Visa (which has been hacked for the third time in about a year).

'Inmate Payment, $160.25'
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Old 07-20-2015, 02:37 AM   #34
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A few months ago my CapOne card was hacked - they caught it when 3 airline tickets for the same time frame were charged within 24 hours... One was first class on Emerates airline.... Over 10K. I was worried because this was a card I planned to use for much of our vacation and I'd charged our airfare just 2 months earlier.

CapOne handled it perfectly. They'd left 2 voicemails and an email when they detected the fraud (I was in Italian class and didn't have my ringer on.) When I called them back they asked about various charges to determine which were mine and which weren't. I was NOT charged for the bogus air tickets. And they issued a new card, fedexed out, within 48 hours.
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