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Old 05-13-2010, 11:49 AM   #21
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I don't know and I don't care. I don't invest for yield, I invest for total return.
Yeah, Berkshire Hathaway's yield sucks, and it may be decades before that changes.

Buying the Dow Dividend ETF (DVY) in early 2009 would have achieved nearly a 6% yield. One small problem-- that was based on the trailing 12 months. Another small problem-- the ETF was heavily loaded with financials. I don't think there was a better indicator than TTM back then, but there were certainly a lot of dividend cuts during that period.
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Old 05-13-2010, 12:00 PM   #22
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OK ...
Yield: The number reported by a Morningstar X-ray analysis as the yield for your portfolio.
3.59%

40% stock, 40% bonds, 10% cash eq, 5% ccf, 5% reit
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Old 05-13-2010, 01:29 PM   #23
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Buying the Dow Dividend ETF (DVY) in early 2009 would have achieved nearly a 6% yield. One small problem-- that was based on the trailing 12 months. Another small problem-- the ETF was heavily loaded with financials. I don't think there was a better indicator than TTM back then, but there were certainly a lot of dividend cuts during that period.
I did even better in terms of chasing yield. I bought the KBE bank ETF when I was looking at 6+% trailing 12 months yield. And it was selling at a huge discount to what it traded at a year earlier. Now the yield is probably closer to 0.6%. At least it has slightly outperformed the SP 500 while I have owned it (but what a wild ride down and back up it was).
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Old 05-13-2010, 01:34 PM   #24
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OK ...
Yield: The number reported by a Morningstar X-ray analysis as the yield for your portfolio.
I did two Xrays, because withdrawals from one account will be taxed and the other won't.
In my Roth IRA:
72.8% VGSIX
27.2% TIP
3.27% Yield

In my 457
PTTRX 4.3%
VTINX 95.7%
Yield 2.64% (1.98% after tax?)

I am still in the accumulation phase. The 457 account has about 4 times as much in it as the Roth.
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Old 05-13-2010, 06:30 PM   #25
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If you define yield, I'll come up with an answer.

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OK ...
Yield: The number reported by a Morningstar X-ray analysis as the yield for your portfolio.
M* misses too much of my portfolio to be meaningful. Less than 5% of my portfolio is in US stocks, bonds or cash.
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Old 05-13-2010, 07:41 PM   #26
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Wow... Incredibly useful info. Thanks so much to everyone who answered!
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Old 05-13-2010, 09:08 PM   #27
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I did even better in terms of chasing yield. I bought the KBE bank ETF when I was looking at 6+% trailing 12 months yield. And it was selling at a huge discount to what it traded at a year earlier.
Ouch... I remember selling that one for a big loss...
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Old 05-14-2010, 09:19 AM   #28
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Ouch... I remember selling that one for a big loss...
Luckily I held on. The yield is basically non-existent, but it has performed acceptably (on a relative basis). I'm up a whopping 4% since I bought it (including reinvested divs). Maybe I bought your discarded shares? Like I bought your IJR (or IJS??) shares the other day!

Just checked KBE's yield - 0.3% on an annualized basis for the trailing 6 months.
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Old 05-14-2010, 10:43 AM   #29
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Running my own permanent portfolio thru morningstar gives a yield of 2.23%.
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Old 05-27-2010, 09:46 AM   #30
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Running my own permanent portfolio thru morningstar gives a yield of 2.23%.
Is that the Permanent Portfolio a la Harry Browne, or do you mean the assets you intend to retain permanently?
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Old 05-27-2010, 10:45 AM   #31
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My yield is easy. I only have <$50,000 in mutual funds. So I add mutual fund income distributions, interest, stock dividends and MLP distributions, ignore capital adjustments of TIPS, and divide this sum by current market value of entire portfolio.

Right now it yields 3.1%. I live on this, unless I should sell some higher yielding assets and move to cash for tactical reasons.

Ha
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Old 05-27-2010, 05:08 PM   #32
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My yield is easy. I only have <$50,000 in mutual funds. So I add mutual fund income distributions, interest, stock dividends and MLP distributions, ignore capital adjustments of TIPS, and divide this sum by current market value of entire portfolio.

Right now it yields 3.1%. I live on this, unless I should sell some higher yielding assets and move to cash for tactical reasons.

Ha
Not surprising the my yield is very close 2.98%, to yours. My Berkshire position helps drag down the yield.

I also live of the income. Now some of that income is my IRA so I have no easy way to use it. I find that when I retired roughly 30% of my assets were in IRAs and now that has increased to 40%.
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Old 05-27-2010, 07:51 PM   #33
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Not surprising the my yield is very close 2.98%, to yours. My Berkshire position helps drag down the yield.

I also live of the income. Now some of that income is my IRA so I have no easy way to use it. I find that when I retired roughly 30% of my assets were in IRAs and now that has increased to 40%.
Yes, we likely have a similar cast to our portfolios. I want mostly dividend payers that increase that dividend regularly, and are not speculatively financed. I also have smaller positions in non dividend payers, or small payers. As I get older, fewer and fewer true non payers.

My yield is being dragged down by the pretty hefty cash postion, in the neighborhood of $500,000. Partly I have been holding cash in case I need a big down payment for condo; but also because I am somewhat wary of valuations and world conditions. I think my overall cash yeild is less than 1%, because I have not wanted to move IRA funds away from my broker to a get a better CD rate. If the current stalemate continues, I will have to do that anyway. I do not like to be led into adding risk or duration by manipulated short term treasury rates.

A change like I mention above and I would immediately pick up $8000 or $9000 in interest.

Ha
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