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Old 11-09-2012, 09:19 AM   #21
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Reading that list it sounds surprising that anyone could survive in Texas, let alone live an enjoyable life.

I think you're just exaggerating so no more people move there and you can have it all to yourself.
Would it change your opinion if I added Governor Rick Perry to the list?
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Old 11-09-2012, 09:25 AM   #22
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Reading that list it sounds surprising that anyone could survive in Texas, let alone live an enjoyable life.

I think you're just exaggerating so no more people move there and you can have it all to yourself.
It was not my list, so I cannot attest to its exaggeration, if any.

And talk about enjoying life, or rather inability to do so, I am not living there and have no plan to move there, so I claim impartiality. However, I will note that for the hardy type, just staying alive is a challenge that one will enjoy.

Just relaying the info, that's all. People who want to move there will have to think for themselves.
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Old 11-09-2012, 10:11 AM   #23
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I can't think of one person I know who lives in Texas who does not like it. Obviously, the state has something going for it.
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Old 11-09-2012, 10:23 AM   #24
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Again, those could be the hardy survivor type who can now brag about it. The ones that perish cannot tell their story. Again, I am not a Texan, but just want to point out some possibility.

Where I live, it's so hot that many of the murderous critters in the above Texan list could not even survive, though some like the scorpions love the heat and thrive. And we have the Gila Monster, an ugly venomous lizard. But the real danger is very short: HEAT. The record high is 122F (50C), which matches that of the Sahara desert. Just the HEAT. That's it. If you can stand the heat, the little critters are mere annoyances. They don't bother me any.

PS. The scorpions sometimes cannot handle the heat either, and seek refuge in the homes. I forgot to point this out. Yes, they can be a bit bothersome, occasionally.
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Old 11-09-2012, 11:38 AM   #25
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The heat in AZ is something that concerns me. Not now, but over the next 30-40 years with climate change. So we're hoping to find someplace a bit higher up (than the valley) that's still affordable and close enough to the ammenities (mostly medical).
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Old 11-09-2012, 11:43 AM   #26
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I have already claimed my spot at 7000 ft. Most of the land up there is national forest, or BLM land. There isn't a whole lot left.

When it gets that hot, I might make some money on the side by letting people camp out on my lot. Or not.
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Old 11-09-2012, 12:10 PM   #27
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Louisiana is listed as one of the 10 worst states for retirement, but I do love it here despite everything, and we plan to stay for a while.

I think that maybe I have finally come to terms with the hurricanes to some extent, although the memories will never die. The crime just seems to get worse and worse, though, no matter how valiantly our law enforcement battles against it.

But until crime drives us away, I am loving it here. I love my home, and the other seniors here are such treasures. I love the culture and attitudes here. And, the tax structure is wonderful for retirees IMO. I even love the much-maligned climate here. If nothing changes and crime is held back, I would stay here for the duration. We shall see.
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Old 11-09-2012, 12:13 PM   #28
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Would it change your opinion if I added Governor Rick Perry to the list?
Just another varmint...
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Old 11-09-2012, 12:19 PM   #29
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FWIW. I would have thought there were other states with nominal population lost, evidently only MI in the 10 years ending 2010. Though it's clear movement is mostly southeast, TX and west (but not coastal). Note the national average was 9.7% so it can be argued that only the green states (and yellow above 9.7%) are netting real population increases. And northeast as a region continues to fall behind, largely thanks to COL and weather presumably. And who knows, 2020 may look different. I'm convinced that water shortages will eventually change the picture - time will tell...
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Old 11-09-2012, 01:30 PM   #30
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I live in NYC but I have considered relocating to Las Vegas. I am not into gambling, but the casinos come with some great entertainment and shows not to mention great restaurants such as those found in NYC and other places.

Also, LV is a reasonable distance to some of the best national parks in the country, especially in southern Utah and Arizona. For that matter, southern Cal is only a few hours away by car.

The COL is low, and the airport will connect you easily to virtually anywhere else you want to go.

I would be interested in hearing others chime in on Vegas as an early retirement locale.
I don't remember for sure, but I think that you are someone who mentioned that you are able to live pretty cheaply in NYC.

If so, the only reason to leave is if you are a professional poker player or a successful sports bettor. For anyone else, IMO Las Vegas is a cesspool. For years I considered moving there, but everytime I visited I decided, great sports action, love the bars, but a truly horrible place to live unless you are a casino exec or a professional gambler. Not many places can depress me in 2 weeks, but LV can. And crime?

OTOH NYC has the most impressive cultural lineup in the US, and it is a beautiful city. You even get to see the NY skyline full size, unlike in Las Vegas.

Ha
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Old 11-09-2012, 01:50 PM   #31
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While I do not think of myself as picky, most large cities depress me, here or abroad. I enjoy visiting many, but to live in one, not really. I do not even need 2 weeks. A couple of days to visit, and I have enough. But then, I never like crowded places. The larger the city, the worse for me because it means even the suburbs are crowded. Life is too short to be caught in traffic jams, in my view.

About LV, I do not think its suburbs or adjacent towns are that bad. Henderson was the one that I mentioned, but of course it is boring to some, just like any other suburb. The last time we drove by LV with our RV, we did not even stop because we had seen it quite a few times, and we are not gamblers.
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Old 11-09-2012, 03:23 PM   #32
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FWIW, Another list... Worst-Rated States for Retirement 2012 - Cost of Living, Crime - AARP

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Old 11-09-2012, 05:08 PM   #33
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Regarding the looming shortage of water in Nevada, the Colorado river water is also used by Arizona and Southern California. I do not know how the water is negotiated between the western states, but this problem with water is nothing new. Yet, people keep arriving.

Many years ago (25?), the LA area had a severe water shortage, but it seems to go away. Perhaps the aquaduct and pumping projects that brought water down south from the Sacramento River played a big part.

Phoenix has another source of water from the Salt River. However, the water from the Colorado River is used for agriculture down in Yuma. This area provides 90% of the green veggie consumed in the US in the winter. Yet, some say that agriculture water use is higher than residential use. So, what to do? Shower or eat? It's tough!
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Old 11-09-2012, 05:41 PM   #34
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Link to an earlier thread on the subject.
the 10 worst states to retire in, etc
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Old 11-09-2012, 06:26 PM   #35
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Different criteria, different results. IMHO the top 10 best places to retire should be based on your own criteria.
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Old 11-09-2012, 06:35 PM   #36
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We are going to retire in our main home (Illinois far south suburbs of Chicago) and vacation condo (Arizona Phoenix northeast valley ). For us - both have good and bad points.

Illinois (good)
1. summers are decent
2. Chicago & suburbs are great for things to do

Illinois (bad)
1. State is essentially bankrupt and dragging it's residents with it
2. Nasty winters
3. Taxes

Arizona (good)
1. fantastic weather October through April
2. Never rains (I hate rain)
3. baseball spring training
4. great hiking

Arizona (bad)
1. Beyond extreme heat May through September
2. Critters that can kill you (rattlesnakes, scorpions, bobcats, javelinas,etc) and I always seem to find them

So it looks like we need to do Illinois in summers and Arizona in winters hoping that Illinois pulls itself together.
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Old 11-09-2012, 06:54 PM   #37
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My hometown would be on few top ten lists, if any. Don't care. Like it here, live within my means, and have lots of friends and family nearby.

Disclaimer: my position might change depending on how bad this winter is. Have a feeling it will be a bad one based on the unbelievable output of acorns from the oak trees around here.
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Old 11-09-2012, 07:09 PM   #38
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Arizona (bad)
1. Beyond extreme heat May through September
2. Critters that can kill you (rattlesnakes, scorpions, bobcats, javelinas,etc) and I always seem to find them
Now, here's someone else who can attest to the oven-like heat in the summer in Phoenix. But I have some minor corrections to make.

The highest temperature in the world is indeed in the Sahara, but it was up to 136F (58C). Only Death Valley in CA even comes close at 134F. The highest temp in Phoenix was indeed 122F (50C), but in Havasu City, it was 128F (53C). The difference is about the same as cooking steak rare or medium rare.

However, the highest temps are the extremes. What is more important is the average temperature throughout 24 hrs. Sahara's daily high is usually in the 90s, while the average temperature in Phoenix in July is 95F (35C).

That's 95F average between day and night! And it happens every summer. You can count on it. Yet, people keep coming.
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Old 11-09-2012, 08:13 PM   #39
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Now, here's someone else who can attest to the oven-like heat in the summer in Phoenix. But I have some minor corrections to make.

The highest temperature in the world is indeed in the Sahara, but it was up to 136F (58C). Only Death Valley in CA even comes close at 134F. The highest temp in Phoenix was indeed 122F (50C), but in Havasu City, it was 128F (53C). The difference is about the same as cooking steak rare or medium rare.

However, the highest temps are the extremes. What is more important is the average temperature throughout 24 hrs. Sahara's daily high is usually in the 90s, while the average temperature in Phoenix in July is 95F (35C).

That's 95F average between day and night! And it happens every summer. You can count on it. Yet, people keep coming.
I remember coming into town several times past 10 pm when the temp was over 100. And it amazes me how many people are eating dinner outside at restaurants when its 110+.
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Old 11-09-2012, 08:58 PM   #40
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I remember coming into town several times past 10 pm when the temp was over 100. And it amazes me how many people are eating dinner outside at restaurants when its 110+.
That is the one good thing about PHX or LAS, or maybe I am getting old and thin skinned. Once the sun goes down I thought the weather is great out there whether is it's 95 or 105. Felt great to me with the low humidity, and no flying bugs to swat while eating outside.
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