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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?
Old 05-29-2005, 10:29 PM   #21
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?

Rules regarding immigration change over time, so I donít know what the criteria are today, but I imagine they are similar to when my wife and I immigrated. It was a points system, and you were awarded points based on education, work experience, having a certain amount of money (but not millions), and age. The older you were, the less points you would be awarded. Also had to submit police reports verifying that you had no serious criminal past and pass a health check. At the time we immigrated there was a cutoff at age 55, no one older than that would qualify. The amount of points needed to be accepted varied depending on what the New Zealand government wanted to achieve regarding the number of immigrants. I know in the past they have tightened up the English language requirements. My wife and I both had university degrees and work experience, we were not criminals and in reasonable health, although my wife does have a thyroid problem that requires medication. Health requirements could be an issue for some as NZ has subsidized medicines, and public hospitals are free.

There are other categories, some people come in on temporary visas when they have been offered work, and then apply for permanent residency status. We were granted permanent resident visas, and were not required to work. My wife did work a few temporary jobs at first, but then enjoyed an extended period of doing volunteer work. The past couple of years she has gone back to working 20 hours a week in a school library, only gets paid $11/hour and is doing it more for something to keep her amused. I still donít think an offer of employment is necessary if you are desirable enough, but having a job offer got you extra points under the system when we immigrated.

Be warned that you will pay more in income taxes here than what you would owe in the U.S. As permanent residents we can vote. Another bonus is we will eventually become what I call double dippers. As U.S. citizens we will collect Social Security, but as NZ residents we will collect what is referred to as universal superannuation when we turn 65. A married couple in NZ who are both over 65 receive about NZ$25,000 before tax.
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?
Old 05-30-2005, 02:10 PM   #22
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?

thank you kindly, Thumper1, for the comprehensive reply!

Caroline
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?
Old 05-30-2005, 09:03 PM   #23
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?

Thumper,
thanks- very interesting the way they cut off at age 55. In the U.S. I believe (but am not sure) that it is easier to get in if you are older, at least if you are family, since the INS feels comfortable that you won't take a job from an American. Sounds like in NZ they dont want you to come live as a retiree, but do want you to come help build the country. Do you feel there is any social stigma being an ER there? Or does the issue just not come up. Assume people would understand that you are not 'on the dole'. Or do you find the need to have small subterfuges 'I am researching the market for high end sailboats' or 'I am consulting to a U.S. brewery conglomerate on ways to improve the taste of American beer' or whatever?
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?
Old 05-30-2005, 10:56 PM   #24
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?

In developed nations like Canada, Australia and New-Zealand you can apply in the 'skilled worker' category based on a points system. This is a better category than retirement visas as far as that still exists. It is based on your language skills, age, education and work experience. As long as you are not too old, healthy with a good education in a high demand field, you are in. Btw, it does not mean you will ever have to work. There may be some restrictions on how soon you can get on welfare after arrival, but otherwise there are no restrictions.

Canada, Australia and New-Zealand are all very very very easy compared to the USA. If you go, apply while you are still in your 40's otherwise you may have a tough time. Most of the countries have online self-assesment tests that give you and instant idea of your chances.

The US has a most outdated system that does not make sense. I spent 7 years in the INS nonsense mill. Canada was very easy - 2 hours to fill in the paperwork and within 6 weeks I got my permanent resident papers in the mail. DH was in Australia for a while and he got an Australian passport after two years (although don't know where that went).

In developing nations like Costa Rica, Mexico etc. most of the immigration visas for retirees are in Belize etc. and they don't want you to work.

Europe is virtually impossible. If I were to move back to Europe with DH, it will take me months to years to get him the legal paperwork to become a permanent resident - even though I am a citizen. Immigration has tightened a lot and especially for 'import' spouses from developing nations. The most ridiculous part is that he does qualify for EC citizenship based on our marriage. So if he were to do some language/culture test at the consulate now, he would become a citizen, no residency requirements needed.

Vicky
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?
Old 05-31-2005, 12:34 AM   #25
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?

Quote:
Originally Posted by vic
Canada, Australia and New-Zealand are all very very very easy compared to the USA.
Hi Vicky:
Pondering Canada as eventual ER destination. (plan to apply as a Skilled worker). Would you mind offering a view on the queries below? (Have asked CIC but no reply)

1. Can one still get Residency in a matter of weeks or was that a while back?
2. When granted permanent residency, is there an expiry date on the Visa, i.e. you must permanently move to Canada by a certain date or the Visa expires?
3. As with a Green card, must you reside in Canada a minimum numbers of days each year to continue to hold permanent residency status?
4. Did holding a Green card create additional burdens or complications with your application?
Thanks in advance
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?
Old 05-31-2005, 05:14 AM   #26
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?

ESRBob,

I will try to answer your questions, although I see VIC may have answered some as well. NZ wants people that will contribute to the economy, that is why skills, youth etc. are an advantage. Older people are undesirable because they cost more to look after with regards to medical care and pensions. There could be some social stigma to being an early retiree, but I proudly tell people I saved up enough not to work and they seem to accept that, except one fellow who did not believe me and thought I was embarrassed to say what I really did. The best advice I could give to someone intending on settling in another country is be prepared to embrace the culture of
that country (In NZ it is said to be rugby, racing and beer, but actually is a lot more), and not be one of these ugly Americans that is always telling people how things are done in America. I think as long as you are not super rich people will accept you. There have been a number of rich types (Shania Twain for example) who come down and buy up prime real estate for millions, and that does not go down too well.
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?
Old 05-31-2005, 05:57 AM   #27
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?

Quote:
Originally Posted by vic
In developed nations like Canada, Australia and New-Zealand you can apply in the 'skilled worker' category based on a points system. This is a better category than retirement visas as far as that still exists. It is based on your language skills, age, education and work experience. As long as you are not too old, healthy with a good education in a high demand field, you are in.* Btw, it does not mean you will ever have to work. There may be some restrictions on how soon you can get on welfare after arrival, but otherwise there are no restrictions.

Canada, Australia and New-Zealand are all very very very easy compared to the USA. If you go, apply while you are still in your 40's otherwise you may have a tough time. Most of the countries have online self-assesment tests that give you and instant idea of your chances.

The US has a most outdated system that does not make sense. I spent 7 years in the INS nonsense mill. Canada was very easy - 2 hours to fill in the paperwork and within 6 weeks I got my permanent resident papers in the mail.* DH was in Australia for a while and he got an Australian passport after two years (although don't know where that went).

In developing nations like Costa Rica, Mexico etc. most of the immigration visas for retirees are in Belize etc. and they don't want you to work.

Europe is virtually impossible. If I were to move back to Europe with DH, it will take me months to years to get him the legal paperwork to become a permanent resident - even though I am a citizen. Immigration has tightened a lot and especially for 'import' spouses from developing nations.* The most ridiculous part is that he does qualify for EC citizenship based on our marriage. So if he were to do some language/culture test at the consulate now, he would become a citizen, no residency requirements needed.*

Vicky
I would not emigrate to any country that would want me as a citizen

JG
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?
Old 05-31-2005, 08:50 PM   #28
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?

Don't worry, you are way too old to qualify for any of those places....

Countries do not impose citizenship on other people, otherwise I would not be in the US
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?
Old 05-31-2005, 09:14 PM   #29
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?

Lets chip in and send John to Sweden with a baguette and directions to a local bank.
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?
Old 06-01-2005, 06:12 AM   #30
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?

Quote:
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Lets chip in and send John to Sweden with a baguette and directions to a local bank.
Is that a baguette in your pocket or are you just glad to see me?

JG
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?
Old 06-01-2005, 12:29 PM   #31
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Re: ER in Rural Ireland?

Its a baguette
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