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Old 10-16-2016, 01:14 PM   #41
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BTW, I don't blame the traffic engineers, they know how much traffic a given road can carry. I blame the politicians who allow overbuilding and not funding adequate roads.
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It can be determined what the queue is going to be. Same thing for women's restrooms! Holy cow how come someone cannot figure this out? I think the formula is the same.
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Old 10-16-2016, 02:16 PM   #42
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One of the best things about our small city life (outside of Akron, OH) is that rush hour means that you have to sit through 2 RED LIGHTS! We do have a freeway and that does experience rush hour from about 7am to 9am and 4pm to maybe 6:30pm, weekdays. We can easily avoid the freeway during those times.

We both grew up in the eastern suburbs of Cleveland and one of the reasons I would never live there again is that the traffic is awful. Not Atlanta or NYC or Chicago or Houston kind of awful but bad enough to keep me out of there. There is a large retail area near where my Dad lived and even on the weekends the traffic was bad.
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Old 10-16-2016, 02:46 PM   #43
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Unlike many eastern US cities, Atlanta was not built on a major river and thus does not have as many bridge bottlenecks as the other cities. With more road options why is traffic worse in Atlanta?
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Old 10-16-2016, 04:17 PM   #44
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Unlike many eastern US cities, Atlanta was not built on a major river and thus does not have as many bridge bottlenecks as the other cities. With more road options why is traffic worse in Atlanta?
Whenever you have highways merging, or a major arterial road(s) merging onto the highway, you will have bottlenecks. When you have several million people living in a metro area, and a large % of them work in the city limits, all trying to go there (in the morning) or leave (in the afternoon), you will experience bottlenecks.

If all cars were computer-controlled and maintained a steady speed with a small separation distance, it would be better (but even then, there is a limit to how many cars you can safely squeeze for a given speed per hour per lane). Add in just a few drivers hesitating or waiting or causing just a 5-10 second delay, and you instantly have backup with hundreds of cars behind that one car also slowing down and adding to the slowness.
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Old 10-16-2016, 04:33 PM   #45
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Whenever you have highways merging, or a major arterial road(s) merging onto the highway, you will have bottlenecks. When you have several million people living in a metro area, and a large % of them work in the city limits, all trying to go there (in the morning) or leave (in the afternoon), you will experience bottlenecks.

If all cars were computer-controlled and maintained a steady speed with a small separation distance, it would be better (but even then, there is a limit to how many cars you can safely squeeze for a given speed per hour per lane). Add in just a few drivers hesitating or waiting or causing just a 5-10 second delay, and you instantly have backup with hundreds of cars behind that one car also slowing down and adding to the slowness.
Very true, but all of that is present in the other cities as well as Atlanta.
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Old 10-16-2016, 08:38 PM   #46
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Unlike many eastern US cities, Atlanta was not built on a major river and thus does not have as many bridge bottlenecks as the other cities. With more road options why is traffic worse in Atlanta?
I'll hazard a guess: 2000-2010, HOU, DFW, and ATL added the most people of all metro areas at over 1M each & in low +20%'s. Haven't spent time in HOU, but a lot in DFW & ATL. My observation is that DFW built many more new highways in that period than ATL did. Hence, more road crowding in ATL.
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Old 10-17-2016, 05:59 AM   #47
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I'll hazard a guess: 2000-2010, HOU, DFW, and ATL added the most people of all metro areas at over 1M each & in low +20%'s. Haven't spent time in HOU, but a lot in DFW & ATL. My observation is that DFW built many more new highways in that period than ATL did. Hence, more road crowding in ATL.
The influx of people is obvious if you live here. I've been here since 2008 and commute 20 miles one way from north of the city to just inside the city (at the perimeter). In 2009, I would leave the house at 7:30 to get to work at 8. By 2012 I needed to leave the house by 7:15 to get to work by 8. In order to have a 30 minute commute now I leave the house at 5:30 and get to work about 6.

After a couple years it was obvious that each year, in August (when school goes in session here) and after the New Year, I could fairly accurately predict an additional 5 minutes of commuting time if I left at the same time as I did the previous year. By 6am the interstate is below the speed limit in many areas due to congestion. The construction in progress is making traffic a bit worse now but should get it back to how bad it was last year when it opens up the new lane(s) in a couple years.
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Old 10-17-2016, 12:52 PM   #48
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The influx of people is obvious if you live here. I've been here since 2008 and commute 20 miles one way from north of the city to just inside the city (at the perimeter). In 2009, I would leave the house at 7:30 to get to work at 8. By 2012 I needed to leave the house by 7:15 to get to work by 8. In order to have a 30 minute commute now I leave the house at 5:30 and get to work about 6.

After a couple years it was obvious that each year, in August (when school goes in session here) and after the New Year, I could fairly accurately predict an additional 5 minutes of commuting time if I left at the same time as I did the previous year. By 6am the interstate is below the speed limit in many areas due to congestion. The construction in progress is making traffic a bit worse now but should get it back to how bad it was last year when it opens up the new lane(s) in a couple years.
When I first started driving, the metro Atlanta area had 3 million people. Today, it's almost 6 million. Back in 1992, the general rule was that you could get almost ANYWHERE in the metro area in 30 minutes or less. Today...not the case. Not only that, if you read some of the population studies, they will tell you that Atlanta isn't even at 50% of its population "capacity"...yeah, I don't think so.
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