Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-22-2014, 05:01 PM   #21
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
brewer12345's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 16,391
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArkTinkerer View Post
Only place I've really seen economical wood heat is people who live in the woods or the cabinet shop where they burn the wood scraps to heat the shop.
That is essentially what I do. The wood I get for free would otherwise be tossed in a dumpster and frequently the homeowner is giving it away because otherwise they would have to pay the tree service to dispose of it. Yesterday I picked up what will become somewhere between a half and full cord of free wood (once I cut it). I figure I might have $5 of gasoline and chainsaw oil into it.
__________________

__________________
"There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest have to pee on the electric fence for themselves."



- Will Rogers
brewer12345 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 08-22-2014, 05:04 PM   #22
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Upstate Ruralia
Posts: 283
Hey Art.... didn't mean to insult you!

And, if one looked at everything from an economic standpoint, then YES it is cheaper to sit on the couch, very quietly, watch over the air TV, and eat one egg for breakfast, a PBJ sandwich for lunch, and some 60/40 hamburger for dinner...but who wants to?!?!?!?

You could also live in sweat clothes and long undies and keep the thermo at 50 in winter...you can survive doing that, but who wants to?!

I admire people who have the energy to do the self sufficiency thing...I think I'm jealous of them because I cannot,....so for me, weighing economics first seems to be the way for me.....

My neighbor has vehicles with about 76 pneumatic tires on them. And a bunch of internal combustion engines. What does it cost to keep all that crap running? In order to get wood for heat and grow 25.00 worth of veggies? I can't make it work, but he seems to enjoy it.

And maybe, if I had more to do with my time, I wouldn't be ridiculously obsessed with my neighbor's tire collection. ( altho he does come over and complain about how he has to think about going back to work cause he's broke!!!)
__________________

__________________
Lcountz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2014, 06:01 PM   #23
Full time employment: Posting here.
bjorn2bwild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Western US
Posts: 690
I am torn between two equally interesting choices -
The homestead on acreage and a high level of self sufficiency /or the lightweight mobile lifestyle. For now, mobility is more important to me - the homestead will have to wait. At least I am largely self sufficient on the mechanical front.
If the zombie apocalypse happens in the mean time, I will be forced to join the roving bands of malevolents - please pass the prepper.
__________________
How's it going to end..............
bjorn2bwild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2014, 06:43 PM   #24
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Northern Kentucky
Posts: 8,585
Lots of trees on the property, so an unlimited supply of wood for the fireplace.
It's just a supplement, but it does keep the heating bill down a little.

I've made a lot of my own beer for over a quarter century, and it is mostly better than anything I can buy.

Fly fishing is a great hobby, and although mostly catch-and-release, I do bring home some fish now and then for dinner.

A small vegetable garden doesn't contribute much, but it sure is tasty.

Every once in a while I'll get the urge to go deer hunting, and now and then I'll actually bag one. Venison is delicious, but I probably average not more than a couple dozen pounds a year. Still, it's a treat.
__________________
braumeister is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2014, 06:47 PM   #25
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
brewer12345's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 16,391
As far as hunting goes, being in the woods is its own reward. In the off season I spend lots of time there anyway. Bringing home game is the icing on the cake, and since it is usually school in session and chillier weather during hunting season, I generally have the woods to myself. Nobody seems to care about small game here in Colorado, so I get prime small game areas to myself most of the time.
__________________
"There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest have to pee on the electric fence for themselves."



- Will Rogers
brewer12345 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2014, 09:41 PM   #26
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 555
LCountz,

No offense here. Very sedate polite forum and I like it this way!

I just see so many people miss out because they get caught up in the commercialization of so many good things in life. Gardening is sticking seeds in the ground. Make it complicated and expensive if you want but don't condemn it later because of what it has become. Biking can be enjoyed on a cheap $20 flea market buy or even a freebie on craigslist or freecycle. Or it can be a $2000+ custom mountain bike!

I have old machine tools I play with (and plan to play with a lot more!). They are worth more as scrap metal than what I paid for them. My machinist friend said I should have bought new $5000+ tools instead. He misses the point that fixing the tools is part of the fun. I will understand the tools better, and their limitations, after going over every inch of them.
Is it profitable? Maybe. I could make a lot more selling my time. But that would be real work instead of tinkering...
__________________
ArkTinkerer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2014, 10:00 PM   #27
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,471
Fresh herbs are super easy to grow, especially thyme, sage and rosemary. Harsh winters kill rosemary but I just stick a new plant in the ground. Some are problematic--basil attracts Japanese beetles for example.

Garlic is great. I buy a bulb or two from the store. Stick the cloves in the ground around the periphery of my veggie plot in late October. A few shoots show up. Then I bury them in the November leaves. In the spring they get uncovered. Harvest in July, wash well and dry, hang or braid, good to go when they've dried slightly. 15 bulbs from one bulb. And it helps keep the digging animals away.

Thought about self sufficiency a lot, never did enough. But I do make my own music. :-)


Sent from my iPhone using Early Retirement Forum
__________________
EastWest Gal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2014, 10:59 PM   #28
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 5,326
If cooking for ourselves from whole foods counts as self sufficiency then I guess we are more into that these days than we used to be. Today I made home made soup in my energy saving Instant Pot with stuff from around the kitchen - black fungus, shitake mushrooms, mustard greens, fava beans cooked from dried beans, dried tomatoes and leftover chicken. DH was surprised it actually tasted pretty good.

I use drying racks for clothes. It is a good Zen activity and I get some fresh air and sunshine. I also make my own cleaning products with natural ingredients. DH has learned to cook quite well and do our own taxes. So I guess we do little things for self sufficiency, if those all count.
__________________
daylatedollarshort is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2014, 01:04 AM   #29
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 390
Reading "The Rational Optimist" I learned we're becoming more dependent, not self sufficient, and that's a good thing. (Google "I Pencil").

I do my own AC, appliance, plumbing, car repair and maintenance, but when it comes to growing my own potatoes, it's easier to buy a 5lb bag at the dollar store.
__________________
Elbata is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2014, 06:16 AM   #30
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Major Tom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: SF East Bay
Posts: 3,128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lcountz View Post
And, if one looked at everything from an economic standpoint, then YES it is cheaper to sit on the couch, very quietly, watch over the air TV, and eat one egg for breakfast, a PBJ sandwich for lunch, and some 60/40 hamburger for dinner...but who wants to?!?!?!?
I think this guy would consider that a rather over-the-top lifestyle

The Strange Tale of the North Pond Hermit
__________________
ER, for all intents and purposes. Part-time income <5% of annual expenditure.
Major Tom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2014, 08:00 AM   #31
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 555
If you really want to be a slug-a-bed you can get paid for it...

NASA will pay you $18,000 to stay in bed for 70 days | DVICE
__________________
ArkTinkerer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2014, 09:05 AM   #32
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
imoldernu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Peru
Posts: 4,616
A fun subject.

Since I turned age 8, a secret part of me has always wanted to be there, when the rest of the world had given up. Even though I was too young then, to join Boy Scouts, I had a old Handbook, which taught me about self sufficiency. I always carried my home made emergency kit... razor blade, fishline and hook, safety pin, aspirin tablets, water purification tablets, flint, tinfoil (what we called it then), signal mirror, two bandaids, needle and thread and a Hopalong Cassidy mini compass ring.

A small part of me still thinks in survival terms. After WWII, there was a great underlying fear of nuclear disaster and the scout program was geared to wilderness survival. Not a direct connection, but the "Be Prepared" motto put a premium on the concept of self sufficiency.

For a taste of this, spend a few minutes here... The 1911 Handbook, for what I'd consider an amazing compilation of basic knowledge about the world we live in. If there was to be only one book left in the world... this might be "It".

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/29558...-h/29558-h.htm

(check out the requirements for an "Aviation" merit badge for kids ... in 1911... and, for some of our members, the Merit badge for "Beekeeping".

In 1911, the Boy Scout Handbook was the "Wikipedia" of 103 years ago. Still pertinent today.
..................................................
While I don't hunt or farm, reliance on others is very limited. Now, because we live in a CCRC community, there is no outside work, but like the OP, I do all of my own repairs, and have an unending curiosity about hobbies and things I've never done or been exposed to. Nature is my second home. Being outside in the woods trail and streams is my idea of nirvana.

Quote:
In the Buddhist context nirvana refers to the imperturbable stillness of mind after the fires of desire, aversion, and delusion have been finally extinguished. In Hindu philosophy, it is the union with the divine ground of existence Brahman (Supreme Being) and the experience of blissful egolessness.
So yeah... self sufficiency... not necessarily end time but more a philosophical framework for fitting in with self confidence.

Adding one more item... one of the pages I turned up when poking around the self sufficiency subject... For only $24,000 you can buy a Zombie Apocalypse survival kit.

http://www.dudeiwantthat.com/gear/we...alypse-kit.asp
__________________
imoldernu is offline   Reply With Quote
Tales from South Louisiana
Old 08-23-2014, 09:25 AM   #33
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 246
Tales from South Louisiana

Quote:
Originally Posted by travelover View Post
I eat my roadkill.
On one trip back home to Cajun country years ago, my parents met me at the airport. Mom had a plate lunch for me in the truck (couldn't wait to feed me until we got home...), and she had to issue the disclaimer that the barbeque pork was a road-kill wild boar a friend 'encountered' while driving to Oakdale. Tasted fine..

Eating road-kill is like eating off the floor: if you can establish the pedigree (in the case of the floor item, did you see it hit the floor and do you know what it is) and it hasn't been there too long, go for it...
__________________
ggbutcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2014, 09:34 AM   #34
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 5,562
Quote:
Originally Posted by ggbutcher View Post

Eating road-kill is like eating off the floor: if you can establish the pedigree (in the case of the floor item, did you see it hit the floor and do you know what it is) and it hasn't been there too long, go for it...
True, just make sure it's legal in that state. A good buddy of mine lost his hunting privileges for a year from picking up some venison. Don't know it that state has changed it's laws since then.

Years ago road killed venison was handed out to prisons and schools in that state. They've since stopped doing that. So the viable food source is wasted, and a huge expense to collect and destroy. What a waste.
__________________
MRG is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2014, 10:29 AM   #35
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Northern Kentucky
Posts: 8,585
Possum: the other white meat.
__________________
braumeister is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2014, 01:27 PM   #36
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Yuma AZ
Posts: 270
I consider any investment that reduces an otherwise ongoing expense to be part of a "Broadly Diversified Portfolio".



Stuff - If you are going to need something “down the road”, and can buy it now for later use, there is a good chance it will be a better “investment” than normal investments. Buying food on sale, in bulk cuts down on overall food costs. (One of our “highest return” investments for the past few years has been cans of corned beef. I could NOT have guaranteed after tax returns that would have kept up with the rising price of a can…) For some published thoughts on this aspect, see the book Alpha Strategy, available online free to read at:
The Alpha Strategy

Jack Spirko, a podcaster on preparedness, speaks on how preparedness is also a retirement plan.
Preparedness As A Retirement Plan | The Survival Podcast


For more thoughts on “outside the box” investment / cost cutting try:
http://www.offthegridnews.com/otgN45...ctricbills.pdf
http://www.offthegridnews.com/otgN45...t_Survival.pdf
__________________
unno2002 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2014, 03:31 PM   #37
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 8,615
The local grocery stores have plenty of free samples practically every day. So "foraging" in the stores can be quite productive.

One trick is to have a set of 5 to 10 close-by stores that one can eat at for free without being in the same store every day. If they are within walking or biking distance, so much the better.

I still remember one store celebrating king crab legs day. I think my son ate about 5 pounds of them just by himself, but the staff was very happy that they didn't have to throw them away.

Another favorite is wine-tasting at these places.
__________________
LOL! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2014, 03:56 PM   #38
Moderator
rodi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: San Diego
Posts: 8,802
I'm less interested in self sufficiency and more interested in saving money and efficiency.

We garden because we like to cook and fresh fennel, thyme, rosemary, basil, tomatoes, artichokes, peaches, nectarines, limes, oranges, grapefruits, pumpkins, etc. make the cooking interesting.

I cook from scratch - including bread, pie dough, etc... because I like the product better than storebought - and I have time now that I'm retired.

I'm learning to sew - because I bought a cheap machine at a garage sale and want to relearn skills of my youth. I don't expect to be producing designer clothes - but can see doing some simple stuff.

We've talked about chickens - but DH is against it. I'd love to get them, but worry about hawks having them for dinner. (We're on a canyon and red-tail hawks are regular neighbors.) Our neighbors owl box is occupied - so that might also put any chickens we got, at risk.

We're still weighing the pros/cons of solar... but would probably not go so far as getting inverters and going off the grid... So not really self sufficient there.
__________________
rodi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2014, 04:25 PM   #39
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 5,562
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodi View Post

.....snip.....

We've talked about chickens - but DH is against it. I'd love to get them, but worry about hawks having them for dinner. (We're on a canyon and red-tail hawks are regular neighbors.) Our neighbors owl box is occupied - so that might also put any chickens we got, at risk.
Red-tail hawk will take a chicken, at least they took ours. So will raccoons, fox, coyote..... If you don't want to feed local predators you cage an area with good tight fence to keep the unwelcome critters out. Depending on how many hawks in the area, may get away with letting chickens roam for part of the day(not dawn or dusk).



Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Early Retirement Forum mobile app
__________________
MRG is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2014, 04:53 PM   #40
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 5,326
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodi View Post
We've talked about chickens - but DH is against it. I'd love to get them, but worry about hawks having them for dinner. (We're on a canyon and red-tail hawks are regular neighbors.) Our neighbors owl box is occupied - so that might also put any chickens we got, at risk.
The main predators for one of our friend's backyard chickens are raccoons.
__________________

__________________
daylatedollarshort is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
self-sufficiency


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Another Reason For Energy Self-sufficiency yakers Other topics 10 06-25-2007 10:12 PM
Self-insurance health opinions and challenges Roger_R FIRE and Money 23 05-27-2007 07:56 PM
Early Retirement from Self Employed nwsteve Other topics 17 07-24-2004 04:18 PM
Self Directed IRA Suggestions moguls FIRE and Money 12 02-24-2004 03:00 PM
Real Estate in a self-directed IRA???? ryalmokas FIRE and Money 2 02-23-2004 10:29 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:56 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.