Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Military Retirement
Old 02-08-2009, 09:57 PM   #1
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 51
Military Retirement

Howdy everyone,

Nords' "Fog of Work" essay reminded me, in much better eloquence than I could express, why I am working so hard now to retire in 5 years, 8 months. I asked this same question about 4 years ago on this forum, but there are many new faces in the crowd now and wanted to see how the military retirement has worked out. Nords gave an excellent reply then. I have been applying his recomendations and think I am doing OK. I will have my house paid for in 18 months, have maxed out the TSP since its inception and have my IRA fully funded 1/2 roth, 1/2 conventional. Like everyone else have been hammered by the recent buying opportunity.

I just got my O-6 promotion in July, so I am in my final billet, no more moves, unless they change their minds. So to make a long post even longer, how have the military retirement benefits worked for you? Has the healthcare lived up to its promise? How about prescriptions? Has the COLA portion actually worked in real terms? Spousal benefit or not? Life insurance? I took the retirement seminar at the 10 year mark and am due to take it in the near future again. 5 years should go fast as I have been lurking here for 4 years and I still feel like a noob.

Thanks again for everyone's willingness to share their insights and visions. This forum is an excellent resource and often a motivator to keep up the fight when I really get weak and want to splurge and get a new motorcycle or start some other retirement derailing hobby.
Thanks again,
Sonny Jim
__________________

__________________
I'll be done Jan 1, 2015, but who's counting.
SonnyJim is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 02-08-2009, 10:03 PM   #2
Moderator Emeritus
Khan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Pine Island, Florida
Posts: 6,868
Send a message via AIM to Khan
Quote:
Originally Posted by SonnyJim View Post
Howdy everyone,

Nords' "Cloud of Work" essay reminded me, in much better eloquence than I could express, why I am working so hard now to retire in 5 years, 8 months. I asked this same question about 4 years ago on this forum, but there are many new faces in the crowd now and wanted to see how the military retirement has worked out. Nords gave an excellent reply then. I have been applying his recomendations and think I am doing OK. I will have my house paid for in 18 months, have maxed out the TSP since its inception and have my IRA fully funded 1/2 roth, 1/2 conventional. Like everyone else have been hammered by the recent buying opportunity.

I just got my O-6 promotion in July, so I am in my final billet, no more moves, unless they change their minds. So to make a long post even longer, how have the military retirement benefits worked for you? Has the healthcare lived up to its promise? How about prescriptions? Has the COLA portion actually worked in real terms? Spousal benefit or not? Life insurance? I took the retirement seminar at the 10 year mark and am due to take it in the near future again. 5 years should go fast as I have been lurking here for 4 years and I still feel like a noob.

Thanks again for everyone's willingness to share their insights and visions. This forum is an excellent resource and often a motivator to keep up the fight when I really get weak and want to splurge and get a new motorcycle or start some other retirement derailing hobby.
Thanks again,
Sonny Jim
I am a civilian retiree of DOD and can not offer specific advice. I will say the retirement seminars were very helpful and gave me the confidence to take an early buyout.
__________________

__________________
"Knowin' no one nowhere's gonna miss us when we're gone..."
Khan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2009, 10:31 PM   #3
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Indialantic FL
Posts: 1,201
I retired from the Army in April 2007, last Nov I decided to leave the Civil Service after just over a year and have no regrets.

Tricare - great value, I use the mail order pharmacy no complaints. I have the Dental insurance too, not sure that it is worth it for everyone.
COLA - 5.8% increase for 2009...
SBP/Life Insurance - lotta discussion on various thread on the forum, I chose life insurance over SBP, everybody's situation is different. Check out the Army Airforce Mutual Aid Assoc or the Navy Mutual Aid Assoc, I think their term and whole life policies are competitive with any, they also have some survivor assistance services.

One thing that I would have done differently is built up more of a cash cushion vs being 80 or 90 percent invested in stock in my non-retirement funds. I was on cruise control with automatic investments etc. While you may not need 5 years worth of expenses in cash, you do need to have a cushion. Also, I would be on a first name basis with your Doctor. If you have physical issues that may seem minor to you, get them checked out and documented in your health records.

Congratulations on the promotion!

Jim
__________________
JimnJana
"The four most dangerous words in investing are 'This time it's different.'" - Sir John Templeton
jimnjana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2009, 04:38 AM   #4
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
OAG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Central, Ohio, USA
Posts: 2,598
I retired from the Army in 1979, my oldest Son is in the process of retiring from the Navy this summer (O6 Aviator, 2 more weeks of work then terminal leave). The COLA, Tricare and later Tricare For Life have all worked as advertised for me. I took minimum SBP (final premium for me is next year). My Son's "retiring" process was a little different than mine, and IMO much more thought out. As already been said be sure to get that final Physical nailed down (get and keep a copy of it). Be sure to get all of the dental work you may need done BEFORE you get out (restorative work like implants and/or caps) - much easier to get done while still on AD. Need any Eye work - Lasik - get it done now, if you can. Attend all those seminars - they may not fit but they can help. Attend any Job Fairs put on by the departments or service - if you are seeking employment after retirement - or just for the information. I have a policy with AAFMA (was AMAA when I left) - good, inexpensive coverage, and they do provide survivor services (here is where that final physical MAY come in handy some day). Good luck, congratulations on the 06, and hope you enjoy the final 5.
__________________
Vietnam Veteran, CW4 USA, Retired 1979
OAG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2009, 02:32 PM   #5
Dryer sheet wannabe
Mickey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 17
Hi, SonnyJim -

My situation is a bit different than yours - retired USAF E9, no spouse or kids - but I've been retired now for a little over a year, so maybe I've got some inputs for you.

I'm fully RE - I don't work. I live solely on my retirement pay, which covers my expenses, allows me to put extra on my mortgage and still put 10% towards savings. The COLA increase this past January was very nice. As I had "only" been retired for a year, I got 5%. It just shows up in your monthly check...

I live in upstate New York, which is nowhere near any military facility. In fact, where I live is outside Tricare Prime territory. I have thyroid disease, which requires daily medication and regular check-ups. But, Tricare standard came through and it was very easy to find a doctor in the large town next to me for care. They dealt enough with Tricare that they would send in the billing forms and then Tricare billed me. I also used the mail order pharmacy and got 90-day scripts at $8.

Looking back, the hardest part about Tricare was my learning curve! As a single person with no kids, I never dealt with medical stuff (just went when/where the AF told me to). Overall, the system works pretty good and [my apologies to everyone else...] it is W-A-Y cheaper than other medical plans/insurance. Of course, you could retire near a military base and reduce most of your hassle. That wasn't an option for me (wanted to be near my mom and siblings).

I do pay for dental insurance, which I find to be beneficial. With Delta Dental, I get 2 cleanings for less than the cost of not having insurance ($32/mo x 12 insurance gets me two cleanings "free" versus two at $237 each cash value). I like having my teeth cleaned/checked bi-annually. So, it's a savings for me. They also pay (minus deductables and such) for other things, but hopefully, it'll be a while (never ... if you please) until I need to have work done.

I don't have SBP (no spouse) but I did go with the veteran's version of life insurance: VGLI. I got $100,000 for $250.80/year with no physical (can convert SGLI with no statement of health up to 120 days after discharge date). I've got it because my mom is my roommate and she can't afford to stay here if I die - hence, the insurance to cover paying off the house. I'll drop it when the house is paid for. Regardless - I find VGLI to be a good deal.

I'll vote with all the others that have responded: Get everything looked at/checked out while on active duty. It'll take one last worry off your mind to have medical issues covered while you worry about everything else. And, another agreement - get it so your pension plus SWR equals your AD take home pay. Then, you'll have a lovely built-in cushion, what with the COLA increases. Though ... maybe not this year. But, the checks don't decrease!

The biggest issue for me may be the same for you. If you don't plan on working after retirement, my experience has shown that you will have the hardest time fending off all the people (military,civilian and family) who don't (won't?) believe you aren't going to work again. They'll keep trying to convince you you're crazy or won't offer constructive advice/comments. And, you can imagine the kind of comments active duty folk can offer!

Even the AF wants you to work again! As Nords has pointed out before, the separation briefings are focused on getting you back to work days after your final retirement date. Although, they ARE entertaining if you are going to ER (three "free" days off just to attend a seminar ... in civvies? I'm there!).

All this to say "Come on in, the water's fine!" I've not regretted a minute of the past year (after putting in 27+ years in). It's been wonderful.

Whew! Guess I had a lot to say. Sorry for the ramble.

Marilyn

P.S. Congrats on O-6. Awesome!
__________________
Mickey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2009, 03:23 PM   #6
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,620
Quote:
Originally Posted by SonnyJim View Post
... how have the military retirement benefits worked for you? Has the healthcare lived up to its promise? How about prescriptions? Has the COLA portion actually worked in real terms? Spousal benefit or not? Life insurance?
Welcome back, SonnyJim, and congratulations on O-6! You'll never tell a joke badly or have to make coffee ever again…

Nice to know that the assignment officers will leave you alone for half a decade. Judging from most Navy careers, I thought BUPERS had a strict policy of a short-cycle tour or an IA at least every 24 months.

The military retirement system seems to be one of the world's best COLA annuities. Even if you calculated its value in I bonds or 30-year TIPs you'd have a hard time replicating it. Here's a post with 10 years of COLA vs pay-raise data and a link to a Tom Philpott article on how military pensions are doing against inflation:
2010 cola

If you're retiring in the area of your duty station then you're probably more familiar with the quality of the military clinics. I've been using a civilian clinic staffed by residents, and I feel as if I get more time with each doctor although the staff seems to turn over almost annually. When you retire, don't feel obligated to make a military facility your primary care manager. You might also find good care at the VA, although every location is different. But it's been a ghost town nice to go up to Schofield Barracks' clinics when the 25th ID is deployed.

I'm not on maintenance prescriptions and Tricare has still been pretty relentless about advertising their mail-order pharmacy. Otherwise we find it easier/quicker to go out to town for a copay on a prescription from a civilian pharmacy (even $6, although usually less) than to wait at a military clinic pharmacy for 45 minutes.

No dental insurance. No major problems so it's cheaper to pay out of pocket-- and splurge on flossing, of course!

Can't tell you about spouse benefits. She's had no trouble with Tricare but otherwise she's been using the Reserves. She just retired in December and has 13 more years to her pension. Since she's getting her own pension (and we have enough savings) we don't carry life insurance. I think it's wise to insure your future income, but when you're done working then life insurance may be better used as an estate-planning tool.

I sent you some additional info in a PM. Check your messages.
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2009, 04:03 PM   #7
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 119
Hi SonnyJim!

Congrats on your promotion! I just retired from the Navy as a Chief (E-7) in December, and I have been cruising the last month. I don't have a huge nestegg (some TSP and IRA), but so far living on my retirement. I don't have many bills and no mortgage (just renting with my fiancee). I just recently got Tricare Retiree Dental and Retiree Tricare.

This is a great place to motivate you! I don't want to go back to work if I don't have too. I know I am young, etc..., but so far, I just have been doing officiating/referee games for a little extra spending money. I get $25-50/game for running up and down the floor for an hour. Exercise and getting paid...What a life!

I am also going to school to use my GI Bill to kill time. I am working on my last 6 hours for my Bachelors and will begin soon after to get a Master's Degree. I figure I might as well not work, but go to school.
If I do go back to work, I want to be a coach! That would be fun and not work for me!
Good luck to you, Sir!

Erik
__________________
Boxkicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2009, 05:06 PM   #8
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 125
BZ on your promotion! As one of the other posters also did, I went directly to a pretty choice GS posit immediately after retirement, lasted one year, and then resigned (quit). It's a ways off for you, but I learned from this experience that the reasons you left the military active duty don't change when you go to the civilian side of the organization. If anything, they are exaggerated in ways you can't imagine. Even with great pay, great benefits, and great co-workers, I walked at 13 months.

So, don't be too quick to jump on that great deal that someone's likely to offer you, though the temptation is incredible.

In the immortal words of Monty Python though, "And now for something completely different." The GI Bill looks to be a true winner, and available to those of us who went through with ROTC scholarships...so I intend to return to school to learn another skill for the next fifty years.
__________________
deepc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2009, 07:13 PM   #9
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,620
Quote:
Originally Posted by deepc View Post
...so I intend to return to school to learn another skill for the next fifty years.
You'll have to keep us posted. After eight years at training commands, most of the time evaluating other instructors, I fear that I'm among the world's worst students.

I'd have a hard time with homework & due dates, too.
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2009, 08:37 PM   #10
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 51
Thanks for the congrats! I was lucky to get it on the first go at the O-6 and I am glad it is behind me. I live near a military base, but outside its catchment area so I currently have a private PCP under Tricare Prime Remote. My family is on Tricare standard so they can go to most any provider.

Thanks for the medical advice. One of the guys at work who retired and came back CC never had his exit physical completed and is missing out on at least 15% disability. I have had back surgery and various other maladies that may well add up to 15% or more disability.

I am planning on checking out and not returning except to have a lunch and bs with the gang. I have been working on living on just my retirement paycheck now and saving everything else, so the conversion should be more or less painless. I will miss the windfall bonuses they seem to come up with every couple of years. I will also miss the MRB, but I will get over it. I foolishly didn't take the GI bill and recommend to every new recruit not to follow in my footsteps.

Thanks to everyone, especially NORDS, whose advice and example are followed by the silent masses wh don't post but who read every post.

Sonny
__________________
I'll be done Jan 1, 2015, but who's counting.
SonnyJim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2009, 08:57 PM   #11
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 11,615
SonnyJim,
Another voice here. Everything is working as advertised. DW handled the medical treatment stuff when I was on AD, so I've depended on her to keep me steered right re: TRICARE, who to call for appointments, etc. We purchased the Survivor's Benefit Plan (SBP) in the full amount, it met our requirements and I couldn't duplicate the coverage for less $$ via any other means. Every military retiree should carefully consider the SBP decision and look at everything--for exampe, coverage for the first few hundred dollars of retirement pay is subsidized by the USG, so it is a very good deal, most folks would do well to take it regardless of the "normal" factors (spouse/member relative age, income needs, etc).
I did not find the VGLI to be a good value, USAA was a much cheaper source of life insurance in my case. Still, after nearly being "left out" of a few good deals over the years (e.g. VEAP--> MGIB) I did sign up for the min amount (about $1 per month) just in case it keeps the door open for something else later.
If you are like me, the last few years wil not be easy ones. In addition to the "normal stuff, as freedom beckons, it gets harder and harder to get into the spirit of weekly staff meetings, "servicing" the overflowing email inbox, smiling when you get the inane taskers with no true value, etc. Keep smiling!
I dropped you a short PM.
Congratualtions on the promotion.
__________________
"Freedom begins when you tell Mrs. Grundy to go fly a kite." - R. Heinlein
samclem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2009, 12:58 PM   #12
Dryer sheet wannabe
Mickey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by deepc View Post
The GI Bill looks to be a true winner, and available to those of us who went through with ROTC scholarships...so I intend to return to school to learn another skill for the next fifty years.
Me too! I've gotten myself enrolled in the local public college (a SUNY school here in NY) and now am just waiting until Uncle Sam/the VA figure out how they are going to run the program.

After missing my chance at the Montgomery G.I. Bill conversion, I am thrilled to take advantage of this program. I made a BAD decision at 18 to not take the VEAP and the USAF never let me fix it when they converted to the G.I. Bill.

I did a happy dance when Congress passed that bill last summer.

Not that I have issues with this or anything...

Quote:
Originally Posted by SonnyJim View Post
I foolishly didn't take the GI bill and recommend to every new recruit not to follow in my footsteps.
Have you taken a look at the new G.I. Bill? The post 9/11 one ... or whatever they're calling it? You get full tuition and fees for [up to] 36 months, $1000 year stipend and BAH at E-5 w/dependants pay - all for being a full-time (12 credit hour) student. All that if you have 3 years of active duty service after 9/11. A most excellent deal!

As far as I can tell, officers qualify for this new bill also. And, I can't see any requirement where you have to get a higher degree than you have (e.g. gotta do Masters 'cause you have Bachelor's).

The VA G.I. bill web site is: GI Bill Home - (U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs)

Tell all your friends!

Marilyn
__________________
Mickey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2009, 01:46 AM   #13
Recycles dryer sheets
Keyboard Ninja's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 157
Congrats! BUT holy crap I have a long way to go before I can see retirement benefits
__________________
Instead of getting angry I just LOL. Can't waste time with stupid people.
Keyboard Ninja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2009, 03:07 PM   #14
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,322
Congratulations on making O6 and on your retirement planning. The other responses have pretty much echoed what I would have said, so I won't repeat them. I would only add that the longer I'm retired, the longer I appreciate those MWR services provided by the bases around the country. Not so much the commisary and BX, since big box stores often undercut these, but things like a free, well-equipped gym, an inexpensive well-maintained golf course, inexpensive marinas if you're into that, and yes, even those stodgy o-clubs.

I would differ with one thing Nords said. As far as an O6 never telling a bad joke or making their own coffee, maybe Nords was never stationed in the Pentagon
__________________
FinallyRetired is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2009, 09:34 PM   #15
Recycles dryer sheets
leftbucket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nords View Post

If you're retiring in the area of your duty station then you're probably more familiar with the quality of the military clinics. I've been using a civilian clinic staffed by residents, and I feel as if I get more time with each doctor although the staff seems to turn over almost annually. When you retire, don't feel obligated to make a military facility your primary care manager. You might also find good care at the VA, although every location is different. But it's been a ghost town nice to go up to Schofield Barracks' clinics when the 25th ID is deployed.

Military brat here...
My folks lived in Schofield in the 70's.
I was born @ Tripler Army Hospital there.
My folks saved the hospital bill from the delivery.
They still tease me about whether or not
they got their money's worth for their eleven dollars.

-LB
__________________
leftbucket is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2009, 09:41 PM   #16
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keyboard Ninja View Post
Congrats! BUT holy crap I have a long way to go before I can see retirement benefits
Believe me...IT WILL GO QUICKER THAN YOU THINK if you stick around! I can still remember my first day of boot camp and my first day reporting onboard a frigate in Hawaii. THAT WAS ALMOST 21 YEARS AGO!!!!

It is worth the pain and heartache! Military retirement is sweeeet! I just got my first retirement check earlier this month and didn't have to work for it!

I just did the VA compensation exam today. Drove 222 miles one way and got .41/mile for it. Came out of there with $179 in cash for driving there and back. Now the waiting begins to see if they give me any compensation.
__________________
Boxkicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2009, 05:08 AM   #17
Recycles dryer sheets
wrigley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Jacksonville
Posts: 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boxkicker View Post
Believe me...IT WILL GO QUICKER THAN YOU THINK if you stick around! I can still remember my first day of boot camp and my first day reporting onboard a frigate in Hawaii. THAT WAS ALMOST 21 YEARS AGO!!!!

It is worth the pain and heartache! Military retirement is sweeeet! I just got my first retirement check earlier this month and didn't have to work for it!

I just did the VA compensation exam today. Drove 222 miles one way and got .41/mile for it. Came out of there with $179 in cash for driving there and back. Now the waiting begins to see if they give me any compensation.

I remember what I was wearing when I got on that plane in Chicago (first time flying) headed for San Diego boot camp.......and that was 1978! I got off the plane and was hearded onto a bus where 2 marines screamed at us the entire drive to RTC/NTC. I'll never forget this black guy that was sitting next to me on the bus. He had a HUGEEEEE AFRO (I said it was 1978 ) and these 2 marines were in this poor guys face telling him how much fun they were going to have shaving his head! OHHHH the good days!
__________________
wrigley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2009, 06:50 AM   #18
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
OAG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Central, Ohio, USA
Posts: 2,598
I remember boarding a train about 6 pm out of Chicago to St. Louis. Train had open windows and from St. Louis it was a bus to Fort Leonard Wood, MO. Our Training Company had 4 Platoons of Recruits (2 filled with guys from Chicago and 2 filled with guys from Detroit) - let the 8 week competition begin! circa May 1958.
__________________
Vietnam Veteran, CW4 USA, Retired 1979
OAG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2009, 08:25 AM   #19
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 542
Well since we are remembering the beginning days of our military time I will add my 2 cents.

It was Ft Know Ky, last week of Jan 86 and it was COLD! We were in the reception area in the old WWII barracks doing our final accountability of all the gear we were issued. The Drill Sergeants were telling us to hold up certain items so they could see we had them. They got to the part about the long john bottoms which went something like this..." Men hold up two pairs of long john bottoms. We realize some of you might have a pair on so as the Drill Sergeant walks around just let him know you have the other pair on."

So here I am a boy from Ga never been as cold in my life, never been this far north standing there with nothing in my hands. The Drill says "Boy where is your long johns?" I replied "I have them on." He said 'Both F ----'in pairs?" I replied "Yes Sir." Needless to say the conversation went down hill from there.

I don't know what made him more upset that I had both pairs on or calling him Sir. I definately had called fire on my position. Within about 15 seconds there were 6 Drill Sergeants around me and I was doing a lot of pushups. I didn't stay cold for long.

Ahh the defining moments in a young man's life.

Tomcat98
__________________
JDARNELL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2009, 09:25 AM   #20
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,134
Remember, you guys started it...

January 6, 1970. When I got off the bus and was "asked" to fall in line I found myself standing next to a guy from Chicago named Otto who looked like this...



...except Otto's shirt and bell bottoms were made from a Soviet flag. I'll bet the three drill sergeants who descended on him still talk about how much fun they had than morning. And I can just hear the war stories the barber is now telling his great grandkids.

Otto became a B52 pilot.

Also, by some strange twist of fate two members of our group had "complimentary" last names that the drill sergeants seem to enjoy pointing out: Hollopeter and Spermo. Really.
__________________

__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Proposal to not pay military retirement until 57! Retireinmy40s Young Dreamers 131 09-15-2009 04:37 PM
I am not really enthused about getting a job after military retirement!! Boxkicker Young Dreamers 24 11-23-2008 05:58 PM
Proposed new Military Retirement Plan mickeyd FIRE and Money 10 08-29-2008 04:17 PM
Military Retirement from USAA mickeyd Other topics 8 03-14-2008 03:52 AM
How to figure military retirement into plan? SonnyJim Young Dreamers 19 06-29-2004 07:42 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:00 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.