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Old 10-02-2015, 11:30 AM   #61
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Just curious- for those nearsighted people out there... What was your contact lens or eye glasses prescription before you had your surgery?
-7.50 and -6.25 so it's a whole new world for folks like us.
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Old 10-02-2015, 11:49 AM   #62
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I don't need cataract surgery yet - just getting into the "ouch, high beams at night hurt my eyes zone."

I am kind of dreading the need for cataract removal. I like my eyes the way they are. I'm -2.50 in the left and -2.00 in my right eye, wear bifocal contacts mostly for distance, and use readers for very fine print and very fine needlework. Presently, I can still read normal print and thread a regular sewing needle using my naked eyes and a good light. But the very fine work is my soul and my passion. Judging from census records and family legend, I come from a long line of people who like to peer very closely at tiny things (except the grandpa who was an insurance agent, and he probably had to read fine print!)

My fear is that after cataract surgery, I will no longer be able to focus for the very, very finest work, and will have to use those awful lighted magnifiers (or not even be able to do the work any more).
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Old 10-02-2015, 12:54 PM   #63
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I don't need cataract surgery yet - just getting into the "ouch, high beams at night hurt my eyes zone."
I had to drive at night last year, and it went WAY beyond that for me. I couldn't see street signs, much less read them, couldn't recognize where I was, was confused by glare bouncing off everything, and felt like cars were whizzing about me unpredictably. It was really really scary for me and there was ZERO question in my mind (or Frank's) that I should never never never drive again at night with vision like that. That was the last time I drove at night. Now, it is scary for me to even be a passenger at night because of all the confusing glare and cars whizzing about that I mentioned. It's like being in a Star Wars battle. I hang on and cringe.

I think I waited longer for the surgery than most people. I didn't drive at night for at least 5 years before that time last year (which was sort of an emergency situation due to F's car breaking down).

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I am kind of dreading the need for cataract removal. I like my eyes the way they are. I'm -2.50 in the left and -2.00 in my right eye, wear bifocal contacts mostly for distance, and use readers for very fine print and very fine needlework. Presently, I can still read normal print and thread a regular sewing needle using my naked eyes and a good light. But the very fine work is my soul and my passion. Judging from census records and family legend, I come from a long line of people who like to peer very closely at tiny things (except the grandpa who was an insurance agent, and he probably had to read fine print!)

My fear is that after cataract surgery, I will no longer be able to focus for the very, very finest work, and will have to use those awful lighted magnifiers (or not even be able to do the work any more).
I'm hoping to be able to do anything fine that I want to do, with just drugstore readers. My doctor didn't say if that was likely or not. We shall see. About ten years ago when I had contacts I didn't mind readers at all, and had a half a dozen scattered around the house.

If necessary, I'd rather use those lighted magnifiers than not see. Frank uses one to solder tiny things together when he is doing various ham radio related projects and it doesn't seem to bother him. His is a really cool, big one that he can use hands free.

More than anything, I am hoping to be able to walk and drive without glasses. I am not counting on that, but it would be amazing if that happens for me.
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Old 10-02-2015, 12:56 PM   #64
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I'm hoping to be able to do anything fine that I want to do, with just drugstore readers.
You realize once you have the surgery you'll no longer be able to pretend you don't see things...
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Old 10-02-2015, 01:09 PM   #65
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You realize once you have the surgery you'll no longer be able to pretend you don't see things...
Well, except for various dubious posts on the forum..... "I didn't see that!!!"
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Old 10-02-2015, 02:15 PM   #66
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DH had is surgery Tuesday morning and he drove for the first time today. He told me that he can read the license plates on cars again and that the colors are vivid. He is well pleased and can't wait to have the other eye done. He goes back to the ophthalmologist 10/7 and we will ask if they have any earlier appts than 10/20 for the second eye.

Good luck with your surgery!
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Old 10-02-2015, 03:42 PM   #67
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DH had is surgery Tuesday morning and he drove for the first time today. He told me that he can read the license plates on cars again and that the colors are vivid. He is well pleased and can't wait to have the other eye done. He goes back to the ophthalmologist 10/7 and we will ask if they have any earlier appts than 10/20 for the second eye.

Good luck with your surgery!
That's very encouraging! Thank you.
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Old 10-02-2015, 07:49 PM   #68
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just curious- for those nearsighted people out there... What was your contact lens or eye glasses prescription before you had your surgery?
Mine is -8.50 and -7.50 and i am eagerly awaiting the time when i can qualify for the implantable contact lens and have insurance cover it...
....................................
-15.0 & -15.75 . Eyeball was so elongated that doc suggest general anesthesia which is not the usual procedure.
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Old 10-02-2015, 07:53 PM   #69
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I had my cataract surgery about 6 years ago and consider it a miracle after being terribly nearsighted all my life.


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Old 10-05-2015, 09:24 AM   #70
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DH said to use your iphone timer.
I started the pre-surgery eyedrops today, and took your DH's advice. It's working out really well so far, and cost nothing. So, tell him "Thank you!" from me. Thanks!

I am so glad that I have this surgery scheduled soon. Maybe (probably) it is just my imagination, but it seems like my vision has gotten noticeably worse in the past six days since I scheduled it.

Also it is wonderful to have Frank right next door so that he can calm my fears in these pre-surgical days, and of course he plans to help me out in whatever ways I need afterwards.
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Old 10-05-2015, 09:27 AM   #71
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Good luck!

Edit to add: this is the eye patch they used for me. If you get one similar, you could take a black sharpie, color the blue part black, then stick it over your eye and use it as part of a Halloween costume. "The Fly".
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Old 10-05-2015, 09:36 AM   #72
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Good luck!

Edit to add: this is the eye patch they used for me. If you get one similar, you could take a black sharpie, color the blue part black, then stick it over your eye and use it as part of a Halloween costume. "The Fly".
.
Amazing! That eyepatch looks gruesome enough already. But I'll be glad to have something to put on it for protection when I'm sleeping and so on.
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Old 10-05-2015, 11:16 AM   #73
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I am 56 and so far, my eye doctor said I would need the surgery eventually, but not yet. Even at my age, when I get my eye exam done each year, my prescription changes a little. I always wonder what happens if your vision changes after lenses are implanted? Do they replace the lenses (it is painful for me even just to imagine implanted lenses taken out and replaced) or they figure you are pretty old already by the time you get your cataract surgeries done that they figure you won't need any new prescription lenses implanted, or maybe they can only do the implant once, and that you are stuck with the initial prescription for the rest of your life?
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Old 10-05-2015, 11:30 AM   #74
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I am 56 and so far, my eye doctor said I would need the surgery eventually, but not yet. Even at my age, when I get my eye exam done each year, my prescription changes a little. I always wonder what happens if your vision changes after lenses are implanted? Do they replace the lenses (it is painful for me even just to imagine implanted lenses taken out and replaced) or they figure you are pretty old already by the time you get your cataract surgeries done that they figure you won't need any new prescription lenses implanted, or maybe they can only do the implant once, and that you are stuck with the initial prescription for the rest of your life?
Even if they could do the implant a second time, I doubt that would qualify as medically necessary.......the cataract is different than a slight change in vision.
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Old 10-05-2015, 11:37 AM   #75
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I am 56 and so far, my eye doctor said I would need the surgery eventually, but not yet. Even at my age, when I get my eye exam done each year, my prescription changes a little. I always wonder what happens if your vision changes after lenses are implanted? Do they replace the lenses (it is painful for me even just to imagine implanted lenses taken out and replaced) or they figure you are pretty old already by the time you get your cataract surgeries done that they figure you won't need any new prescription lenses implanted, or maybe they can only do the implant once, and that you are stuck with the initial prescription for the rest of your life?
My vision began to change in my early 50's, every visit was a new prescription. At 57 the Dr said "cataracts", but also said to just change my prescription each year, and when new glasses didn't fix the problem it would be time to have them removed. At the time it sounded kind of lame, but later I realized it is the right approach. At 61 new glasses weren't good enough, so I had the cataracts removed. My first question to the Doc was if my vision would continue to deteriorate each year. His response was, aside from reading glasses, it should remain stable from now on.
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Old 10-05-2015, 11:54 AM   #76
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My mom had spider webs all over, mostly outside, before her cataract surgery. She couldn't see them! After her surgery things are back to spotless. All the eyedrops was her only complaint.
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Old 10-05-2015, 12:59 PM   #77
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I had cataract surgery fairly early at 52. My vision had steadily declined since about 45. With too much light, I was in a haze. Probably should not have been driving. I couldn't read signs at all. Afterward, it's like a new set of eyes. Absolutely amazing. So glad I didn't wait any longer.

I had to wait 2 weeks between eyes, which was interesting. To see at a distance, I had to pop one lens out of my old glasses for the eye that had surgery. For reading, I had to pop one lens out of a pair of reading glasses for the eye that did not have surgery yet. That was weird.

The procedure was very smooth. The second time I was a little more aware of what was going on during the surgery. Afterward, they told me I was fidgety, which caused some difficulty. I did notice that eye was more sore for a day or two compared to the first.
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Old 10-05-2015, 03:05 PM   #78
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I started the pre-surgery eyedrops today, and took your DH's advice. It's working out really well so far, and cost nothing. So, tell him "Thank you!" from me. Thanks!

I am so glad that I have this surgery scheduled soon. Maybe (probably) it is just my imagination, but it seems like my vision has gotten noticeably worse in the past six days since I scheduled it.

Also it is wonderful to have Frank right next door so that he can calm my fears in these pre-surgical days, and of course he plans to help me out in whatever ways I need afterwards.
Looking forward to hearing your experience. I don't know if you are imagining vision changes. Seems like I'm experiencing the same, perhaps we're able to admit to ourselves how poorly we were really seeing before? I was in different new buildings today, got lost in a drs. office and had no idea what I was seeing in the other place.
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Old 10-05-2015, 03:07 PM   #79
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I had to wait 2 weeks between eyes, which was interesting. To see at a distance, I had to pop one lens out of my old glasses for the eye that had surgery. For reading, I had to pop one lens out of a pair of reading glasses for the eye that did not have surgery yet. That was weird.
I still haven't figured out how I am going to handle this. My surgeries are scheduled for only one week apart. Maybe I can do what you did, although I don't have any reading glasses yet because I don't know what strength I will need. I also don't even know for sure if I'll be able to see better or not, yet.

I will probably listen to the radio and to podcasts a lot during that week, to keep busy without eyestrain.
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Old 10-05-2015, 03:17 PM   #80
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Looking forward to hearing your experience. I don't know if you are imagining vision changes. Seems like I'm experiencing the same, perhaps we're able to admit to ourselves how poorly we were really seeing before? I was in different new buildings today, got lost in a drs. office and had no idea what I was seeing in the other place.
That could very well be what I am experiencing. My surgery is in three days so after that I guess I'll know. This is all such unknown territory for me and naturally it is a little terrifying so I will be much relieved when it is over.

One positive discovery: The drops don't sting my eyes so far.
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