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Old 07-09-2011, 06:33 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by gindie View Post
Ha,

Did you see Larry "J.R." Hagman's story at the botton of that page? I personally wouldn't be happy with an A1C of 6.4, especially if I had been getting it lower with insulin. Unfortunately, the story didn't mention what the A1C was with insulin.
Agree. I would prefer taking the insulin, with a lower A1c. I mostly linked this because it is a general purpose newspaper, and it shows some pretty successful people. Also, I know quite a bit about Aaron's approach, which has been dramatically successful for him.

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Old 07-09-2011, 08:47 PM   #22
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Texas Proud, I have dealt with blood sugar problems myself. You took the right step, see your Doctor ASAP. That A1C is on the high side. Before you do anything again I would talk with your Doctor. The warning five years ago was not enough to scare you. I think wakeup will get you moving. Once the Doctor gives you the OK to exercise then I would do it. Don't mess around with this disease. With a good program of exercise and diet you will live a long life. It takes some getting used to but you can do it. Oldtrig
Thanks for the post... I will have to reread my first one.... but it was 5 MONTHS ago... I kind of ignored it since I had gone back in after 2 weeks of the first test and was tested and he said it was high, but not that bad since I had eaten two hours ago... now my numbers are much higher... but I have also been eating sweats like crazy lately... that has stopped...

I scheduled a visit with the doc this coming Thursday... right after I got back to work from the test...

Told my wife and she is on me... so I will have support there
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Old 07-10-2011, 08:47 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by Texas Proud View Post
Thanks for the post... I will have to reread my first one.... but it was 5 MONTHS ago... I kind of ignored it since I had gone back in after 2 weeks of the first test and was tested and he said it was high, but not that bad since I had eaten two hours ago... now my numbers are much higher... but I have also been eating sweats like crazy lately... that has stopped...

I scheduled a visit with the doc this coming Thursday... right after I got back to work from the test...

Told my wife and she is on me... so I will have support there
Sounds like you need a fasting blood test to re-check both glucose and A1C. If you have taken readings with your meter, I would bring a log of your results for the Dr to review. If not, start tracking your #s today.
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Old 07-11-2011, 09:51 AM   #24
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Can someone explain this to me? The CDC-recommended diet is, in essence, a high-carb diet.
What should I eat more of?

Eat more fiber by eating more whole-grain foods. Whole grains can be found in:

* Breakfast cereals made with 100% whole grains.
* Oatmeal.
* Whole grain rice.
* Whole-wheat bread, bagels, pita bread, and tortillas.
I can understand why people don't get the connection between carbs and obesity -- that requires an extra step of logic. However, it's so straightforward that carbs, slow or fast release, drive blood sugar and insulin. The answer to "Doc it hurts me when I eat carbs" should be "Don't eat carbs" not "Eat carbs."

So what is the logic behind the CDC recommendation? I guess the mindset against fat is so strong that all they have left is to say to eat more slow release carbs.

Some people believe that it is a conspiracy by the drug manufacturers to keep people buying their diabetes drugs, but that's too hard to believe.
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Old 07-11-2011, 10:06 AM   #25
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Sounds like you need a fasting blood test to re-check both glucose and A1C. If you have taken readings with your meter, I would bring a log of your results for the Dr to review. If not, start tracking your #s today.
The A1C test I took was a fasting test... and the high readings were also fasting...


Also, I was wrong in my time frame... I went to the doc about 9 months ago... man, time flys by...
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Old 07-11-2011, 10:21 AM   #26
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So what is the logic behind the CDC recommendation? I guess the mindset against fat is so strong that all they have left is to say to eat more slow release carbs.
The quote, variously attributed to figures from Ben Franklin to Einstein, goes something like:
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The definition of insanity is doing the same thing repeatedly and expecting different results.
It took centuries for the germ theory of disease to become established as conventional wisdom.
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Old 07-11-2011, 10:26 AM   #27
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... However, it's so straightforward that carbs, slow or fast release, drive blood sugar and insulin. The answer to "Doc it hurts me when I eat carbs" should be "Don't eat carbs" not "Eat carbs."

So what is the logic behind the CDC recommendation? I guess the mindset against fat is so strong that all they have left is to say to eat more slow release carbs.
...
TA. I always look forward to your questions and comments on this forum. You could have had a career as a research scientist...

If you have seen the movie "Fat Head" you get the idea how this can situation can come about. Unfortunately, when you get the complete explanation in one sitting, it sounds like a complex conspiracy theory, and people write you off as a nutcase. So, in a 'nutshell', here it is (but do some 'fact checking'):

In the 60's a government committee was established to recommend dietary guidelines (chaired by Sen McGovern). They interviewed scientists and nutritionists and in the end decided to recommend a low fat diet. There was strenuous objection; however, McGovern stated politicians didn't have the luxury of time to fully research their recommendations. Once the guideline was in place, low fat diets became, in essence, government policy. The food industry sprang into action providing products, research $ was expended to show the benefits of this new recommendation, scientists put research proposals into the pipeline for funding, results flowed out showing the benefits, journalists reported these 'findings' to the public, yada yada yada. Today everyone believes fat is bad and must be avoided. Awkwardly, physicians treating diabetics literally are telling them to eat carbohydrates on a careful schedule, check their blood sugar and take additional insulin as needed! Whereas, avoiding carbohydrates would potentially 'cure' them.
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Old 07-11-2011, 10:41 AM   #28
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It is easy to see why a doctor would go along with this. After all, she is not the one with diabetes, and there is safety for her in numbers, but no safety in recommending something widely condemned by official groups. If she recommends the "Diabetic Diet" and the patient has a heart attack, big deal, diabetics have heart attacks. If she recommends a high fat Atkins type diet and patient has a heart attack, shame on bad Doc-she recommended this deadly diet.

What I cannot understand is why patients eat this way, unless they try it and find that it works. IMO, unlikely at best.

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Old 07-11-2011, 12:53 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by TromboneAl View Post
I can understand why people don't get the connection between carbs and obesity -- that requires an extra step of logic. However, it's so straightforward that carbs, slow or fast release, drive blood sugar and insulin. The answer to "Doc it hurts me when I eat carbs" should be "Don't eat carbs" not "Eat carbs."
The same question crossed the minds of the Nutrition and Metabolism Society. See the attached poster which quotes directly from the American Diabetes Association website!.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg WhoGivesCarbs.preview.jpg (48.6 KB, 17 views)
File Type: jpg WhoGivesCarbs2.preview.jpg (30.8 KB, 17 views)
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Old 07-11-2011, 01:29 PM   #30
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I kind of ignored it since I had gone back in after 2 weeks of the first test and was tested and he said it was high, but not that bad since I had eaten two hours ago
OK, I thought based on your above post that you were maybe not getting fasting blood tests.

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The A1C test I took was a fasting test... and the high readings were also fasting...
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Old 07-11-2011, 01:44 PM   #31
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OK, I thought based on your above post that you were maybe not getting fasting blood tests.
Sorry if this has already been mentioned, but the A1C test is not a fasting-required test, because it measures how much sugar has attached to red blood cells over the past 3 months, or so.
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Old 07-11-2011, 01:46 PM   #32
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The same question crossed the minds of the Nutrition and Metabolism Society. See the attached poster which quotes directly from the American Diabetes Association website!.
I looked up this interesting group, and found a reference to a new low carb book which is supposedly heavy on science, by a couple of authors, both scientists and one a scientist/physician.

Amazon.com: The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living: An Expert Guide to Making the Life-Saving Benefits of Carbohydrate Restriction Sustainable and Enjoyable (9780983490708): Stephen D. Phinney, Jeff S. Volek: Books
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Old 07-11-2011, 01:56 PM   #33
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Can someone explain this to me? The CDC-recommended diet is, in essence, a high-carb diet.
What should I eat more of?

Eat more fiber by eating more whole-grain foods.


I read over some material there, and also here: Carbohydrates - American Diabetes Association. They appear to be saying that the best diet has a moderate amount of complex carbohydrates. I see no problem in logic. Because too much is bad, it doesn't follow that best is none.
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Old 07-11-2011, 02:02 PM   #34
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Sorry if this has already been mentioned, but the A1C test is not a fasting-required test, because it measures how much sugar has attached to red blood cells over the past 3 months, or so.
True, but a doctor will (as mine does) require that a fasting glucose test be done along with an A1C. The glucose requires overnight fasting.

That gives you/doctor a "view" of the current short/long term reading of your situation.

I'll just add one point. T2 is a chronic condition that requires that the patient be the "primary caretaker". Sure, you can have a doctor that is "tuned in" (as my PCP is, since her mother had T2 for many years before her passing), but you have to take responsibility for your overall well being.

That means (just like investing), get educated. That also includes taking classes (offered by a lot of hospitals, and a lot of times, covered by your health plan) about the disease, care, and what you need to be aware of. This is very important - especially for those that either don't like to read, or are confused about the many ways and subjects written about T2.

You also need to know (and be aware) of the relationship between T2 and your heart, along with how it can affect the possibilities of strokes. I also go to a heart care group, even though I don't have a specific problem. If you are diagnosed as a T2, it is considered in the same manner as if you already suffered a heart attack.

Knowledge is power in your ongoing care and long-term management of the disease. Not to scare you at all. You can have a long life without the impacts of T2 upon your body, but you have to take responsibility for monitoring your specific situation.

Just some words from one who knows - over ten years as a T2, managing only with diet & exercise (no meds, including insulin) and aggressive monitoring of my "D health".
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Old 07-11-2011, 02:34 PM   #35
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... They appear to be saying that the best diet has a moderate amount of complex carbohydrates. I see no problem in logic. Because too much is bad, it doesn't follow that best is none.
The approved guidelines are 60% carbohydrate, 10% protein and 30% fat. That is 1200 calories of carbohydrates in a 2000 calorie diet, which is not a moderate amount. (80 teaspoons of sugar per day!)
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Old 07-11-2011, 02:36 PM   #36
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I don't know of Volek, but Phinney is quite an interesting guy.

Exercise & Low Carb Diets – Steve Phinney MD | Me and My Diabetes


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I looked up this interesting group, and found a reference to a new low carb book which is supposedly heavy on science, by a couple of authors, both scientists and one a scientist/physician.

Amazon.com: The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living: An Expert Guide to Making the Life-Saving Benefits of Carbohydrate Restriction Sustainable and Enjoyable (9780983490708): Stephen D. Phinney, Jeff S. Volek: Books
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Old 07-11-2011, 02:45 PM   #37
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[/INDENT]I read over some material there, and also here: Carbohydrates - American Diabetes Association. They appear to be saying that the best diet has a moderate amount of complex carbohydrates. I see no problem in logic. Because too much is bad, it doesn't follow that best is none.
Your logic as usual is unassailable, Jeff. If you should become diabetic, please follow your logic and report back to us.

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Old 07-11-2011, 02:52 PM   #38
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I don't know of Volek, but Phinney is quite an interesting guy.

Exercise & Low Carb Diets – Steve Phinney MD | Me and My Diabetes
Thanks for the link. Very interesting.

Volek researches diet and exercise at UConn.

Ha
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Old 07-11-2011, 03:15 PM   #39
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Sorry if this has already been mentioned, but the A1C test is not a fasting-required test, because it measures how much sugar has attached to red blood cells over the past 3 months, or so.
I realize the AIC is a time based average, but normally my Dr does both the fasting glucose test and AIC from the same blood draw (quarterly). May be other Drs do it differently.
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Old 07-11-2011, 03:54 PM   #40
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Been reading this thread now and then and I am concerned about DW. She has type 2 diabetes and takes metformin medication. However, I think she is getting worse instead of staying at a normal level, whatever normal should be. In the last year she is getting worse. Tired all the time, drinks six to seven bottles of water daily plus three or four Diet Cokes. Got her up this morning at 7:45 to watch her sewing shows and she fell asleep watching them. Not the first time that happened. I have never been around a diabetic before and don't know what to look for. I wouldn't know if she is having some kind of attack or if her actions are normal for a Type 2. Oh yeah, always hot. Turn on the fans! What's the A/A set at? Need some feedback. Thanks in advance.
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