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Old 12-20-2016, 09:34 AM   #21
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Zone 3 (Southeast U.S.) all-electric. Neither the heat or air run in October, April, and May. Using that as a baseline.

Nov $20, Dec $40, Jan $75, Feb $75, Mar $40. Total $250 heating

Jun $10, Jul $20, Aug $30, Sep $15. Total $75 cooling
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Old 12-20-2016, 09:38 AM   #22
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Zone 3 (Southeast U.S.) all-electric.
Did I read the wrong climate zone map? I thought I lived in zone 3...cold Canadian prairies??
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Old 12-20-2016, 10:51 AM   #23
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Zone 6a; Southern New England; $0.44 per sq ft for oil heat and hot water this year.
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Old 12-20-2016, 12:30 PM   #24
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In temperate Silly Valley, my mid-December PG&E bill was $304 for 2,500 sf with vaulted ceilings. $192 for gas and $112 for electric. House is kept at 68 most pf the day and 67 at night. Bumped to 69 for an hour in the AM. House is single story and was built in 1988/89. Windows and sliding doors are cheap double pane that leak air around the sliding pane. The bedrooms furthest from the furnace are much colder and we use oil filled radiant heaters set on low in the occupied rooms.

Last January, the bill was over $400. All the more reason to switch to a high Kw solar system and some type of electric heat.
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Old 12-20-2016, 03:09 PM   #25
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I have no idea what zone I'm in but my balanced billing for natural gas runs about $45 per month year around.
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Old 12-20-2016, 03:43 PM   #26
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I'm assuming these zones are plant climate zones? If so we're in zone 7. We have a forced-air natural gas furnace, one rarely used gas fireplace, gas clothes dryer, gas water heater and gas stove so there really isn't any way to separate them out except seasonally. The gas bill in August was 28.36, the last bill was $138.82 for Oct. 31 - Dec. 5. I expect the next one to be ~$200, and maybe peak at $250 for February if we get very cold weather. House is 1700 SF. Oh, and we set the thermostat at 78 F. If DW is out I'll run it up to 79 or 80 and yes I'm wearing long pants and a flannel shirt. Did I mention I hate cold weather?

A guy at work used to tease that NASA used the IR signature of my house as a navigational beacon.

This is why having natural gas available was a big factor in buying the house and why I immediately sprung for the extra insulation package when it was built.
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Old 12-20-2016, 03:57 PM   #27
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We ran the heat last night - but today we have the windows wide open since it's 79 outside. But a cold snap is coming for Christmas....
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Old 12-20-2016, 04:41 PM   #28
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Guess I'm not getting the "zone" thing either. Planting wise, I'm zone 4 in Minnesota. 100 year old home, typically turn on the gas heat (radiators) mid to late October and it can run through April, even May. In the coldest months (Dec, Jan, Feb) it is about $150-200/month to heat the house.
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Old 12-20-2016, 05:08 PM   #29
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Zone 8, natural gas. $0.17/sf for heating only for the season.

The gas bill in the summer is $16 or so (that's got to be for water heating and clothes drier), so I subtracted off $16*12. There's a $10/mo service charge, so I suppose I could add that back during the heating months, taking it up to $0.19/sf.

We spend much more on cooling than heating here.
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Old 12-20-2016, 05:36 PM   #30
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Electric heat pump in Pa. Costs about $20 in Oct. $60 in Nov. $90 in Dec. $100 in Jan. $100 in Feb.
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Old 12-20-2016, 07:58 PM   #31
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Our climate zone is #5. Our house is 2190 sq ft, Our last 12 months' gas bill was $605. That includes gas water heater, gas cooking and gas dryer. we keep the living areas at 74 degrees and the sleeping area at 68. We get so much passive solar heat in the Winter that we have to open windows to cool down the house in the afternoon. On the few days when I run the electric heater to work in the garage, I plan on an extra $10/day for electricity.
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Old 12-20-2016, 08:17 PM   #32
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San Diego checking in here - what is heating?
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Old 12-20-2016, 09:00 PM   #33
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Our retirement home is a 1000sq Ft Metal building with 2 1/2 " closed cell foam insulation . This house is all electric with a tankless water heater . The only mistake I made was a guy talked me into a big PTAC heat pump . It is real noisey and for heat not efficient. . I am looking at a solar mini split . But currently we pay the rural electric company minimum year around 65.00 monthly . This home is in Richards Texas .
The nice thing we built this house ourselves . It is like a bunker.
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Old 12-20-2016, 10:40 PM   #34
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Northern New Jersey here. Zone 6B. Spent $553 in 2016 for natural gas for heat, hot water, cooking and dryer. 2,200 sq. ft. home with 100,000 BTU/hr. (34 gallon tank) condensing water heater and radiant floor heating. I can't believe a 34 gallon tank heats my whole house and we never run out of hot water either.

Comes to $.25/sq.ft./yr, but if I back out $13/month every month for hot water and dryer (summertime bill), I pay $397/year for heat, or $.18/sq.ft./yr.
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Old 12-21-2016, 07:04 AM   #35
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Zone 6a-northern New England. Cost per sq foot for a 2900 sf home is about .58 cents at today's lower oil prices-base board hot water and water tank.


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Old 12-21-2016, 07:19 AM   #36
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2300 sq foot house in Twin Cities. Gas bill this year was $812 which includes water heater, 2 fireplaces (which DW runs a lot) and stove top. We have old house with 3 zone water heat system which is pretty efficient. Keep house at 68 at all times in winter.
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Old 12-21-2016, 08:03 AM   #37
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Zone 6B-northern VA
2 zoned gas furnaces
just use gas for heating house and hot water
$818 for heating season
$.24/sf annually for heating
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Old 12-21-2016, 08:56 AM   #38
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This provided me with a nice math exercise this morning!

2500 sq. ft. house just north of Philadelphia. We use natural gas for heat, hot water, and cooking. We use about $8/month worth of gas in non-heating months so I backed that out of the total for heating. Last year the gas bill for heating was $480 over seven months. That works out to $0.19 per square foot annually.

We keep the house at 68-70 during the day when we are home. It sets back to 65 at night. I also turn down the heat when we are away at the other house.
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Old 12-21-2016, 09:20 AM   #39
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Thanks to this thread it opened my eyes at how little we pay to heat our house, so I'm turning the heat up for the rest of the winter.
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Old 12-21-2016, 09:52 AM   #40
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House built in 1978 that has terrible insulation in the Atlanta (zone 7b) area. It was also designed and built with very large (and not double pane) windows to "bring the outside in" which means it lets in the cold! Anyway...our "treehouse in the 'burbs" is about 2400sf and after adjusting for "non heating periods" (also have gas water heater), I have figured that it costs us about $250 or 10.2 cents sqft/year. I also noticed that it's up about $50 a year since I retired, since I home most of the time. Thermostat is set at 62 at night and 68-70 during the day.
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