Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Those with no kids & no relatives to leave money, is your withdrawal rate still 4%?
Old 08-30-2020, 10:08 AM   #1
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,122
Those with no kids & no relatives to leave money, is your withdrawal rate still 4%?

So, I have no kids, and all my siblings are doing well .. essentially, I'm fine with having $0.00 balance on my nest egg the day I croak and leave the physical universe.

I know many people who have kids are trying to preserve their capital and say 2.5% or 3.00% is the safe withdrawal rate now, so they can leave millions of dollars to their kids and relatives. Well, I don't need to do that .. should I keep my projection at 4% withdrawal ??

Just wanted to hear from people who are like me - no plan to leave their nest egg to anybody .. and absolutely nobody.
__________________
No to consumerism, Living a simple life, enjoying the experience - not the material stuff
cyber888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 08-30-2020, 10:13 AM   #2
Moderator
rodi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: San Diego
Posts: 11,802
I may be selfish... (In fact I know I am)... but I do not plan for inheritance to my kids in my retirement planning.

HOWEVER - I do plan for longevity... since we have no idea how long we'll live and what gyrations the market will go through.

My goal isn't to leave the kids a lot of money (although they probably will inherit a lot unless we have a super extended bear market combined with super high inflation). Rather, my goal is to not be a BURDEN on the kids.

Without a crystal ball - and being financially conservative... I will leave money on the table.
__________________
Retired June 2014. No longer an enginerd - now I'm just a nerd.
micro pensions 6%, rental income 20%
rodi is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2020, 10:20 AM   #3
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
teejayevans's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,551
The only way of achieving that ($0 at death) is that all your money in annuities. At some point I will consider putting a majority of my money in a charitable annuity.
teejayevans is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2020, 10:21 AM   #4
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
kcowan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Pacific latitude 20/49
Posts: 7,363
Send a message via Skype™ to kcowan
I plan to have our stash last until DW is 98. There will likely be some extra costs towards the end for meaks and housekeeping.

But the odds are good that we will leave a substantial inheritance if the market continues to perform. I have discussed our high equity dependence with my kids and they agree that we should keep our 65% equity allocation. It has certainly paid off so far.
__________________
For the fun of it...Keith
kcowan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2020, 10:22 AM   #5
Recycles dryer sheets
Go-NoGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 319
I would still keep the early withdrawals to 4% or less - otherwise I could imagine a scenario where I am, say, 85 and having a balance close to zero would leave me extremely stressed.

When I approach the end of runway, maintaining a constant balance of 7-10 years of living expenses would allow me to sleep a lot better at night. I would be quite happy to leave that to my nephew and nieces or some worthwhile charity
Go-NoGo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2020, 10:23 AM   #6
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Tampa
Posts: 7,982
Also depends on your budget with discretionary vs. non discretionary.
Do you have SS, pensions to cover % of expenses?
Generically speaking in your circumstances, 4% could work.
__________________
TGIM
Dtail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2020, 10:27 AM   #7
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
teejayevans's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,551
Quote:
Originally Posted by Go-NoGo View Post
I would still keep the early withdrawals to 4% or less - otherwise I could imagine a scenario where I am, say, 85 and having a balance close to zero would leave me extremely stressed.
Then if I were you I would postpone SS till 70, so even if you run short at 85, youíll still have a healthy income.
teejayevans is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2020, 10:35 AM   #8
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 136
Iíve wrestled with the same question. Iíd like to hear more about what the collective community thinks.

My thoughts: Itís tough because Iíd imagine we would want to spend more money in our 50s, and 60s in travel and leisure and then slow down after that. I usually use Bernickís Reality Retirement plan on firecalc as my most realistic scenario. But this does increase the success %.

But we would really be able to ramp up spending in the later years to continue to draw down the pile once we saw that 4% wouldnít erode it. But by then Iím sure Iíll just be sitting in a chair someplace and taking walks or watching sunsets...and kicking myself for not spending 5-6% in the previous decades. Lol.
Retireby45ish is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2020, 10:41 AM   #9
Recycles dryer sheets
Go-NoGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by teejayevans View Post
Then if I were you I would postpone SS till 70, so even if you run short at 85, you’ll still have a healthy income.
That is the plan - wait until 70 to start SS. But even then, SS payments by itself alone would not be a comfortable existence, hence some hedging on early withdrawal rates.
Go-NoGo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2020, 11:12 AM   #10
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 179
I have no one I need to leave money too but I'm staying well below 4% because I retired pretty early (45). The 4% rule came from studies of 30 year retirements and I need to plan for a possibility of 40-50 years. I'm comfortable spending up to 3.25%, but my actual draws have been quite a bit lower than that so far.
geeky_grrl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2020, 11:15 AM   #11
Administrator
Gumby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 16,580
We have no children, so no inheritance considerations. Our withdrawal rate is less than 1% now and with that we have everything we want. So it is very likely we'll be leaving a great deal of money on the table. I don't care. It seems wasteful to spend more just for the sake of spending more. And who knows what the future will bring? Whatever it is, I do know that a fat portfolio offers a better chance of surviving it.
__________________
Living an analog life in the Digital Age.
Gumby is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2020, 11:33 AM   #12
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
pb4uski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Sarasota, FL & Vermont
Posts: 29,183
DA and DU are in that siutation... no kids... also, given pension, SS and nestegg no worries about running out of money. Will leaves most of residual estate to a few of their favorite charities. I'm discussing with him using QCDs to do more charitable contributions now while they can enjoy seeing them happen.
__________________
If something cannot endure laughter.... it cannot endure.
Patience is the art of concealing your impatience.
Slow and steady wins the race.

Retired Jan 2012 at age 56...target 65/35/0 AA TBD
pb4uski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2020, 11:43 AM   #13
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
OldShooter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: City
Posts: 6,542
Retired about 15 years ago, we've been spending pretty much what we care to. Some expensive travel, a couple of cars, etc. We've been incredibly lucky and life and we'll still leave a pile. As @gumby says, spending more just for the sake of spending seems wasteful. It also conflicts with the mindset that got us here in the first place.

The other comment I often have in my head when reading these threads is that there is a false premise: the implicit idea that setting an x% course is some kind of commitment, possibly to be recorded on stone tablets. When I drive my car somewhere I am constantly making small corrections, sometimes even big ones to correct errors or to change my destination. IMO retirement is unavoidably like that. Expect change. Expect the need or the opportunity to react to external events. Don't get focused in a number. No plan survives first contact with the enemy.
OldShooter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2020, 11:52 AM   #14
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St. Louis
Posts: 1,344
No kids and distant relatives. I am going to spend 5% of my balance every year after I read about this 90/10 fund. I am in the total market but close enough. Read page 5
https://www.spahnfinancial.com/files...Guide_2019.pdf
It works but swings up and down more than the standard 4% rule.
I am like many of you I want to spend down before death but don't like to be wasteful either. Plus you know when you are old once you spend money you have no way to get any more.
I also retired early to drawn more money down. Part of me feels like it is a waste to die with money.
I really go back and forth with this question.
The distant relatives trouble me the most they act like they are entitled to money. They do not understand no. This troubles me. They just keep saying they will get money no matter how many times you tell them NO.
If I have anything left over I will give it to my church.
FANOFJESUS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2020, 11:56 AM   #15
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
OldShooter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: City
Posts: 6,542
Quote:
Originally Posted by pb4uski View Post
... I'm discussing with him using QCDs to do more charitable contributions now while they can enjoy seeing them happen.
Yes. It's great.

I have mentioned community foundations here before but can't resist pitching them again. These are 501(c)3 organizations specifically formed to benefit their local communities. The visibility and effect of donations to community foundations is great, unlike national charities where your money disappears into a large bucket without a trace. We'll let the Fortune 500 support them.

For example, DW and I have a community foundation fund that is oriented towards individual crisis situations. Sometimes it's small stuff. Steel-toed boots so the recipient can take the job he's been offered. A bicycle for a halfway-house resident who needs to get to his job but who is not allowed to drive. One time we bought all the parts for a high school shop class to repair a car, which the foundation then gave to a needy person. We've done wells, down payments on mobile home roofs, etc. It's kind of a human version of the starfish story.

This is not a donor-advised fund because QCDs can't be used for those, but we have an up close and consultative involvement in the foundation's decisions. Here's a place to start: https://www.cof.org/community-foundation-locator
OldShooter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2020, 12:04 PM   #16
Moderator
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 12,809
Single, no kids, and no desire to leave a large estate. But I'm only 46 years old and I could still be facing a long retirement. So I'm happily keeping my WR around 1.5%. I already have everything I need and money can't buy my wants, so there is no need to spend more.
__________________
46 years old, single, no kids. Exited the job market in 2010 (age 36). Have lived solely off my investments since 2015 (age 41). No pensions.
Current AA: real estate 64% / equities 10% / fixed income 16% / cash 10%
FIREd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2020, 12:14 PM   #17
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Markola's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 2,135
We incorporate SS, home equity, part time work, and Medicare into our comprehensive plan, so the 4% Rule is not very relevant, given all that future lumpiness.
Markola is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2020, 12:16 PM   #18
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Posts: 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by FIREd View Post
Single, no kids, and no desire to leave a large estate. But I'm only 46 years old and I could still be facing a long retirement. So I'm happily keeping my WR around 1.5%. I already have everything I need and money can't buy my wants, so there is no need to spend more.
What do you do for health insurance or plan for given the contstant uncertainty? That's my biggest hurdle to pulling plug so early.
npage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2020, 12:54 PM   #19
Recycles dryer sheets
SpinDoctorTX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Spring
Posts: 300
I have no kids, however we have a "gentlewo/men's agreement" if one of us goes first. DH has 2 sons so they'll get 25% ea. The other half to my family with different distribution instructions for a multitude of possible situations (DM gets all, DS, DB, or their kids). We have a provision that our house can be occupied by DM so long as taxes paid/ repairs done etc. DM is 84 in a month- she lives in Houston 1/3 of the year & on her KY farm the rest of the year..
__________________
In the business of isness >^..^<
SpinDoctorTX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2020, 12:55 PM   #20
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,753
I live on 4% or less each year.
I have no kids, however, I also don’t feel any desire or need to leave this world with $0.
4% is a comfortable amount for me. I buy what I want/need. I plan to never be a financial burden to others.
And if I leave some funds to causes or people I care for, so much the better.
__________________
"We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children.
(Ancient Indian Proverb)"
Zathras is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Noticed more people holding signs &amp;amp;amp;quot;need work or food&amp;amp;amp;quot; rayinpenn Other topics 3 05-03-2015 02:51 PM
How long can you leave home and leave it empty? fh2000 Life after FIRE 123 12-29-2013 07:51 PM
Have you ever borrowed money from relatives or friends? NW-Bound FIRE and Money 31 05-02-2010 08:16 PM
The Most Annoying Foibles of your Family/Relatives TromboneAl Other topics 24 08-27-2009 03:37 AM
for those still wo*king, are you still putting $ in your 401K? ER_Hopeful Young Dreamers 58 01-14-2009 01:12 PM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:59 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.