Join Early Retirement Today
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Climate Change considerations on where to live?
Old 09-16-2020, 07:45 AM   #1
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Gloucester
Posts: 93
Climate Change considerations on where to live?

Wondering if/how folks are taking climate change implications into account when planning where to live in retirement. Recent article from ProPublica looks at various impact projections down to the county level in the US.

https://projects.propublica.org/climate-migration/

A few years ago when I was planning where to live in retirement climate change was a secondary factor I took into consideration. Main factors were COL, taxes, and getting away from deep winters (upper Midwest) when selecting the region to live in. However, I have taken climate change concerns - increased severe weather events - into account when selecting a house, both micro-location and structural build. For example, buying outside of Hurricane evacuation areas, sticking to higher elevation, being slightly inland from coast/rivers, reinforcing the structure, installing drainage, standing seam metal roofing, oversize gutters, etc.

Just interested if/how others are factoring climate change projections into account when retirement planning. Please donít turn this Thread into a political debate on climate change. Thanks!
Canoeboy is offline  
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 09-16-2020, 08:48 AM   #2
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 3,347
I think weather has long been a large consideration for retirees and others in terms of where to locate.
Montecfo is offline  
Old 09-16-2020, 08:56 AM   #3
Recycles dryer sheets
Navigator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Little Rock
Posts: 215
I originally thought about moving to Florida for the warm weather, low taxes and beaches. However, the forecast that it will soon start seeing more hurricanes due to warming ocean temperatures makes me hesitate.
Navigator is offline  
Climate Change considerations on where to live?
Old 09-16-2020, 09:02 AM   #4
Moderator Emeritus
Ronstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 13,541
Climate Change considerations on where to live?

We still plan on retiring to Arizona. I havenít noticed much climate change in the Phoenix area in the 18 years that we have been going there. Itís usually hot in the summer, nice in winter.

But Iíd like to retire somewhere north of Phoenix where summers are cooler. Maybe northern Arizona is a little warmer than it used to be, but thatís ok.

But in Illinois, I think that our winters are not as brutal as they used to be, making the need to get out not as desperate as it used to be.
Ronstar is offline  
Old 09-16-2020, 09:02 AM   #5
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Rianne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Champaign
Posts: 3,455
For a long time I thought about moving to a resort area, ocean, mountains. I think we'll stay right here in the mid-west. We are experiencing a beautiful fall, temperatures are perfect, high 70's to low 60's at night. I"m getting used to the beauty of prairies and flowers. The vast country roads that follow miles and miles of corn/bean fields. I'm starting to appreciate our flat boring landscape.
__________________
"If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.
Rianne is offline  
Old 09-16-2020, 09:06 AM   #6
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
skipro33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Placerville
Posts: 1,594
I agree that weather in general has been a major factor when choosing where to retire. While in the military, I was stationed in the deep south. I considered it uninhabitable because of the heat and humidity. I'm sure acclimation happens, but still, it felt like I could never dry off after a shower until the cooler weather in the fall hit. How folks keep from fungus rotting away, I don't know.

Another military assignment to Alaska had me convinced that long dark winters are also a non option. I was Air Force and on several occasions we sat out on the runway, cleared for take off only to have the frozen air almost instantly freeze up the engines and controls we had to be towed back into a hanger and try again later. Living out West has been fairly tolerable but this year's fires have me rethinking that too. I've always loved Hawaii weather though.... but no family and the health care, especially emergency care is lacking. I had a buddy who's parents lived on Maui. He had a heart condition and needed surgery. On the day of, it was cancelled. Surf was up and not enough staff on hand to assist in the O.R. I guess some things are just more important than others?
skipro33 is offline  
Old 09-16-2020, 09:14 AM   #7
Moderator
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Flyover country
Posts: 18,767
I was fortunate while on active duty to live in every sort of climate, from hot and humid to cold and snowy. That let me find out what I could and couldn't tolerate. Where I live now is sort of a compromise -- neither ideal nor unsupportable, but we're happy enough and see no reason to uproot ourselves at this stage of our lives.

Climate change here in northern Kentucky is definitely noticeable, especially in the last 5-10 years, but slow enough to be tolerable.

Just on our street we have several neighbors who spend six months in Florida to get away from the cold, and one who spends four months in the UP to get away from the heat. So I guess very few find anything to be perfect.
__________________
I thought growing old would take longer.
braumeister is online now  
Old 09-16-2020, 09:18 AM   #8
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
MRG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 10,013
So glad we didn't move to the coast. At 7750' if we get sea water here it's pretty deep.

We have turned on the AC more this year than the previous years here. It ran for most of the afternoon for at least a week.
MRG is offline  
Old 09-16-2020, 09:36 AM   #9
Moderator
rodi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: San Diego
Posts: 12,070
BIL and his wife are planning a move to Florida. They've asked my husband's advice on what to look for in a house. They are looking at new construction. (Hubby was an architect). He's talked to them about the improvements in the Florida building codes so the main thing they need to consider is elevation. He is suggesting a minimum of 10ft above sea level. That little bit can make a big difference.

That advice will be ignored if SIL sees a kitchen she falls in love with. Lol.

We are happy to be almost 350 above sea level. But we live on a canyon so fire risk is very real. We have focused on defensible space and fire hardened changes. (Smaller mesh screens in soffet vents, replacing wood siding with hardy board, metal clad windows, etc.
__________________
Retired June 2014. No longer an enginerd - now I'm just a nerd.
micro pensions 6%, rental income 20%
rodi is offline  
Old 09-16-2020, 09:43 AM   #10
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Historic Florida
Posts: 4,861
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodi View Post
BIL and his wife are planning a move to Florida. They've asked my husband's advice on what to look for in a house. They are looking at new construction. (Hubby was an architect). He's talked to them about the improvements in the Florida building codes so the main thing they need to consider is elevation. He is suggesting a minimum of 10ft above sea level. That little bit can make a big difference.
We would recommend a concrete block home vs stick, in an "X" flood zone. Otherwise insurance could be prohibitive. All homes must have an elevation certificate if close to the beach, otherwise insurance companies will not write policies.
__________________
"Never Argue With a Fool, Onlookers May Not Be Able To Tell the Difference." - Mark Twain
ShokWaveRider is offline  
Old 09-16-2020, 09:56 AM   #11
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Chuckanut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: West of the Mississippi
Posts: 12,464
I recently returned from a short trip to the Pacific Coast. I noticed that the newer houses built in some of the resort areas have elevated the living areas a good 6-10 feet above the ground. The garage and/or parking are on ground level. Perhaps an amphibious vehicle might make a good new car.

https://awesomestuff365.com/amphibious-vehicles/

Quote:
What started out as a reserve of the military community has now grown into a fully-fledged line that encompasses the unique demands of today’s versatile vehicle owner. These vehicles open up endless possibilities for travel and recreation giving unlimited access to the most secluded spots.
__________________
The worst decisions are usually made in times of anger and impatience.
Chuckanut is offline  
Old 09-16-2020, 10:01 AM   #12
Administrator
Gumby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 16,951
Quote:
Originally Posted by MRG View Post
So glad we didn't move to the coast. At 7750' if we get sea water here it's pretty deep.

We have turned on the AC more this year than the previous years here. It ran for most of the afternoon for at least a week.
I read that if every last glacier on earth melted, sea level would rise 230 feet, so you should be golden.
__________________
Living an analog life in the Digital Age.
Gumby is online now  
Old 09-16-2020, 10:30 AM   #13
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 277
As I get older and noticing how things are changing, the best solution is to continue with my plans but not buying a house. Not having a house allows for more options and minimum stuff to worry about.
HF63 is offline  
Old 09-16-2020, 10:37 AM   #14
Moderator
Aerides's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 8,615
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodi View Post
BIL and his wife are planning a move to Florida. They've asked my husband's advice on what to look for in a house. They are looking at new construction. (Hubby was an architect). He's talked to them about the improvements in the Florida building codes so the main thing they need to consider is elevation. He is suggesting a minimum of 10ft above sea level. That little bit can make a big difference.
Most new homes are built with hurricane-safe(r) windows, so for sure get that included in a new build. If they end up buying an existing home, factor in the cost of full-house window replacement or at least full-house accordion shutters.

We're at 13ft above sea level, about a mile in from the intracoastal. Another thing to think about as you go inland is the increased manmade lakes that were created as each new town was drained and established. You want to look at local reports on flooding, etc., to make sure it's done well, and drainage/flooding issues vary by neighborhood, even inside the same neighborhood.

Homes near the entrance of our development have much more of a risk of flooding in heavy rains - those that back up to the main entry road, after a crazy afternoon of heavy rainfall, actually got flooded-by-wake of incoming traffic creating waves which crossed their back yards.
Aerides is offline  
Old 09-16-2020, 11:42 AM   #15
Full time employment: Posting here.
FlaGator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: The 850
Posts: 711
Quote:
Originally Posted by Navigator View Post
I originally thought about moving to Florida for the warm weather, low taxes and beaches. However, the forecast that it will soon start seeing more hurricanes due to warming ocean temperatures makes me hesitate.
And I have heard that for 20 years, and still haven't seen a definitive trend.

This year will end up as active or more so than 2004 and 2005, but that was 15-16 years ago.

Having lived though a hurricane in 2005 and had several tropical storms roll over my house, it's not the "more hurricanes" that matters (if that ends up being true), it's the one that rolls over the top of you that counts. And that is as random an event as one can find.
__________________
Stay at home slacker dad since 2015
FlaGator is online now  
Old 09-16-2020, 12:15 PM   #16
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 3,347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Navigator View Post
I originally thought about moving to Florida for the warm weather, low taxes and beaches. However, the forecast that it will soon start seeing more hurricanes due to warming ocean temperatures makes me hesitate.
Better radar and storm tracking are leading to more hurricanes and tropical storms. Storms that 50-75 years ago would never have been known are now identified instantly and named.

And living on the beach has always carried storm threat. Nothing new there.
Montecfo is offline  
Old 09-16-2020, 12:31 PM   #17
Moderator
Aerides's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 8,615
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montecfo View Post
Better radar and storm tracking are leading to more hurricanes and tropical storms. Storms that 50-75 years ago would never have been known are now identified instantly and named.

And living on the beach has always carried storm threat. Nothing new there.
Yeah, ok, maybe 75 years ago? But for as long as most all of us have been adults there have been satellites and radar, so we've known about the ones that "died on the vine", and tracked every tropical wave coming off the coast of africa for at least the last 40 years.

There are more storms on average for the last 15-20 years than the 15-20 that preceded those. And they are reportedly bigger, and higher intensity, in the past 5 years than the 5 before that. So, pardon me as a floridian, the concern is greater in 2020 than it was in 2000.
Aerides is offline  
Old 09-16-2020, 12:35 PM   #18
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
timo2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Bernalillo, NM
Posts: 2,707
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canoeboy View Post
Wondering if/how folks are taking climate change implications into account when planning where to live in retirement. Recent article from ProPublica looks at various impact projections down to the county level in the US.
Climate change was just one of the factors we considered. But it wasn't the climate change itself, but places to live that might avoid the reactions of the human population to the consequences of climate change events, as in a hopefully safer place to hide out.
__________________

"We live the lives we lead because of the thoughts we think" ...Michael OíNeill
"We can cannot compel others to do our will" ....Norman Goldman
"There never is shortage of the gullible to accept the illogical"...Anonymous
timo2 is offline  
Old 09-16-2020, 01:00 PM   #19
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
HI Bill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 2,187
As a geologist, I see the largest impacts from climate change over the next 20-30 years: coastal areas experiencing sea level rises, increased severity/frequency of storms/hurricanes/typhoons, and increased severity/frequency of fires due to droughts and warmer weather. So, if you're really worried, I'd stay away from ocean beachfront properties, build for hurricanes (if in a hurricane area), and not buy a house in a forested area subject to forest fires (also, no shake roofs).

I'm almost done buying a house at 150 feet above sea level on Hawaii Island, where hurricanes almost never hit, hurricane insurance is cheap, volcanic hazard is moderately low, and severe earthquake hazard is moderately low. I'm not really worried about much, except for flash flooding that could bring soil down from the hill above the yard, into the yard, and possibly, up to the house.

All that said, health concerns as I age weigh much more heavily on my mind than climate change over the next 30 years.
__________________
Balance in everything.
HI Bill is offline  
Old 09-16-2020, 01:06 PM   #20
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: STL
Posts: 123
I was gonna more south for warmer weather, but I may stay in STL or MO for my retirement since I hope I live up to 2070. Actually, my retirement would be simpler because I was gonna land search for may states. And that made me more confused of my rental properties to keep or sell, etc.

Thank you for the link. I had searched the same kind info, but it has been somewhat a bit old. Also, this CA fire would change the climate more dramatically in my opinion.
retire to nature is offline  
Closed Thread

Tags
climate change


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Climate Change Passť? TromboneAl Other topics 48 07-31-2011 02:13 PM
Climate Change - choice between 13" and 16.5" seal level rise? ERD50 Other topics 22 05-07-2007 10:09 AM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:43 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.