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Old 03-22-2021, 05:07 AM   #341
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No, you just replace the whole cover. The LEDs are inside it. It's really simple. It's not really even a can, just a short thing that looks like one. I've been replacing old can lights with the new LEDs. Definitely an improvement. The retrofit LEDs have a wire with a standard E26 end that screws into the socket where the old bulb went, then pop the cover on and you're done. I haven't installed any new ones hardwired, but I'm pretty sure replacing them (in a decade or so) will be pretty easy too.
They replace the baffle, trim ring and bulb all in one unit. Very easy. I installed these years ago (no failures yet) and my electric bill immediately went down $10 a month.

Here's a picture to harley's description.
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Old 04-25-2021, 12:50 PM   #342
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There's still conduit with unused coax running in the wall through all the apartments in my building from the days of the old master antenna. They never repurposed it for cable TV or anything. They installed raceway in the public hallway for that. I intend to move the vertical section of the cable, currently running down the kitchen wall as shown, into the conduit. The photo to the right is a different section of wall, just to show how it will probably look after I somehow cut into the conduit near the ceiling. I'll pull out my apartment's section of the old coax from the master antenna and slip a low voltage ring on the cut conduit before feeding in the cable.

Maybe I'll put a proper termination cap on the old antenna coax that goes to the apartment above, maybe I won't. I'll probably try pulling it out first.

Then I can remove that box at the bottom of the wall in the kitchen. It's opposite the living room jack.

Edit: I just ordered a 40 inch wide work platform because I remember almost tipping my ladder sideways when cutting the hole shown a few years ago. I'll probably use a jigsaw.
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Old 04-25-2021, 01:20 PM   #343
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We just finished painting 18 doors and trims in our home this week. We also replaced old knobs with brushed nickel levers and door hinges that were painted over with brushed nickel door hinges. The doors really look good now. We also repainted two doors leading to the garage and from the garage outside and changed the locks to and hinges to brush nickel. We saved a bundle by buying everything we needed (except the paint) on Amazon and Ebay versus paying 3 to 4 times more at Home Depot.
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Old 04-25-2021, 03:51 PM   #344
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Have you ever had issues pouring paint out of a can, and the can gets paint in the little groove around the lid and makes a mess? Try this...


Apply painters tape in a "vee" pattern
IMG_0139.jpg


Pour the paint
IMG_0140.jpg

Remove the tape, and Voila!
IMG_0141.jpg

I sprayed 150 linear feet of trim for a handyman job I'm doing this week
IMG_0142.jpg

IMG_0144.jpg
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Old 04-26-2021, 04:37 AM   #345
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Have you ever had issues pouring paint out of a can, and the can gets paint in the little groove around the lid and makes a mess? Try this...


Apply painters tape in a "vee" pattern
I am printing off a picture of your trick and taping it to my paint cabinet (otherwise, I'll forget). This is super cool and a great idea that I will surely be using!!!

I've used special lids, and even a plastic piece that slips in the lip, but these all require cleaning and careful handling. The tape hack is so simple.
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Old 04-26-2021, 04:45 AM   #346
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Great hack. I use these can lids

http://Shur-Line 2000576 Quart Store and Pour Paint Can Lid https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01B68Z144/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_4ZX25JJS8B61QWHT2YM7
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Old 04-26-2021, 05:46 AM   #347
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I've got a home repair job that's not worth pictures, but needs to be done. We have really nice cherry cabinets in our kitchen, as well as the bathrooms and living room. They've got the concealed hinges on them. There are also these little rubber buttons that keep the doors from slamming wood on wood. The house is 13 years old. For some reason last winter every one of those little buttons went soft and sticky. No reason I can determine, we've kept the house at the same temperature and everything for the past 8 years since we became snowbirds. I'm suspecting planned obsolescence. So now we have to tug on the cabinet doors to open them. It's a minor inconvenience. But I need to scrape all the sticky debris off the doors, rub them down with Goof Off or something, and put new buttons on. Lots of door and drawers, what a PITA.

In our new house we have the self closing hinges, which are nice. But when we get used to them we come back to the other house and slam the cabinet doors for awhile before we adjust. So I think I'm going to replace the hinges with the self closing types too.

I haven't told my wife my plans yet. She thinks this is the funniest meme she's ever seen:

Harley, sorry Iím late on this but try these...

https://www.amazon.com/HushBumps-Ult.../dp/B072FT6LXS


I use them and they are much quieter than other types.
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Old 04-26-2021, 07:01 AM   #348
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Originally Posted by JoeWras View Post
They replace the baffle, trim ring and bulb all in one unit. Very easy. I installed these years ago (no failures yet) and my electric bill immediately went down $10 a month.

Here's a picture to harley's description.
My grandson's bedroom is upstairs above my kitchen. And every time he and his buddy start roughhousing, those canned lights start popping loose--hanging by the wires.

The cans in my kitchen are large in diameter, and I've been unable to find any light inserts to fit without those spring loaded wires holding them up.
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Old 04-26-2021, 07:20 AM   #349
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeWras View Post
They replace the baffle, trim ring and bulb all in one unit. Very easy. I installed these years ago (no failures yet) and my electric bill immediately went down $10 a month.
We put these in our kitchen as the older cans were showing their age (the white turns yellow over time from the bulb heat). We had previously been using LED bulbs, which alone made a big difference, including a reduction in the heat output.

It's basically about 2-3 times the effort of replacing just a bulb. And they look nicer, it's a clean flush look. And if I have to replace these in 7 years? nbd.
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Old 04-26-2021, 07:36 AM   #350
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Originally Posted by Bamaman View Post
My grandson's bedroom is upstairs above my kitchen. And every time he and his buddy start roughhousing, those canned lights start popping loose--hanging by the wires.

The cans in my kitchen are large in diameter, and I've been unable to find any light inserts to fit without those spring loaded wires holding them up.
Sounds like you got a fancy size. I have the very common Halo 6 inch "old work" cans. Every trim baffle and ring I've thrown at it through the years works perfectly. You might have 8" cans. There are a lot less choices of trim for those, and the springs have to span more distance. You could also have a 6" version of a brand that doesn't have good grab points, or the grab points are damaged. It is very easy to damage the grab points in many cans. Once they are either broken off or pressed down, you have a headache on your hands.
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Old 04-26-2021, 08:02 PM   #351
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We put these in our kitchen as the older cans were showing their age (the white turns yellow over time from the bulb heat). We had previously been using LED bulbs, which alone made a big difference, including a reduction in the heat output.

It's basically about 2-3 times the effort of replacing just a bulb. And they look nicer, it's a clean flush look. And if I have to replace these in 7 years? nbd.
One issue I ran into was the LEDs not dimming as well as the old incandescents. They'd only dim down a bit, then go completely off. I temporarily resolved that issue by leaving one can with an incandescent, which allowed the entire 6 cans on the switch to dim properly. It did leave one can with a different color, but not very noticeably. I replaced the last one when I switched out the dimmer to an LED compatible one.
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Old 04-27-2021, 10:51 AM   #352
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The lighting discussion made me go back and grab links to the latest fixtures I bought ...

These are the COOLEST :-). Whether you are removing an old can, or adding to a current set, or remodeling, or even building ... if you can get a cable to an area above you drywall ceiling, you just cut a hole (I use a 4" hole saw and slightly increase diameter a bit with a drywall saw just working the edges), grab the snake the line voltage cable through the hole from above, connect it to the built in plugs in the fixture box - no wire nuts required. Push the code box back into the ceiling, connect the cannon plug, and slide the fixture into the hole holding the spring tabs up - then released ... like magic - zero failures in three years. $10 each!

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

And, these gimbaled lights for cans ... shows unavailable now, but probably just slight model change ... high quality, no failures in three years - fixes the problem when builders or unaware owners install standard can lights on vaulted ceilings.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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Old 04-27-2021, 11:34 AM   #353
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And, one last item for remodel from three years ago - repainted the common sort of oak cabinets - must be millions of them in the US. Wife wanted white uppers and gray lowers (the usual fashion choice :-)).

Benjamin Moore Advance paint - easy to tailor color choices, huge pallet of options. https://www.benjaminmoore.com/en-us/...interior-paint

Knowing how oak tends to bleed if not perfectly sealed and how there is deep grain, I initially primed with a synthetic shellac which is alcohol/ammonia clean-up- the difference chemistries of the two paints keep them from combining except at the surface layer (I think). Pulled all the doors and drawers, removed hardware, used Krud Kutter to remove oils and waxes, then sanded and then more Krud Cutter, then primer coat, then three coats of Advance thinned a bit with waterborne acrylic Pentrol, sanding lightly and cleaning with tack cloth between each coat.

Then, I thought - hmmm, so tried a couple of doors without the shellac primer, just using light coat of Advance - seemed to work as well, so I would simply put on three coats of Advance.

All this, btw, including the cabinet carcasses - with a very nice angle cut 2-3" (depending on surface) trim brush. A few brush strokes, but on the oak it is very hard to tell - the Advance lays pretty well.

Doors and drawers I painted horizontally.

The Advance takes waaaay more time to harden than regular water based paints. Figure 24 hours between coats to sand effectively. And about a 30 day curing time - longer is harder.

Easy cleanup!
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Old 04-27-2021, 01:07 PM   #354
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I drilled through conduit and cut out a section of the old, probably never again needed master antenna coaxial cable that was probably installed in the mid-60s. I'll run the modern coax for TV and internet through a low voltage surface mount box that I'll install at the hole, and down the conduit, eliminating the visible vertical section running down the kitchen wall.

The thing that bugs me is that a similar building a block away, same height, from the same era, still has an antenna where master antennas go. But I'm pretty sure my building doesn't.
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Old 04-27-2021, 02:35 PM   #355
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Originally Posted by stephenson View Post
The lighting discussion made me go back and grab links to the latest fixtures I bought ...

These are the COOLEST :-). Whether you are removing an old can, or adding to a current set, or remodeling, or even building ... if you can get a cable to an area above you drywall ceiling, you just cut a hole (I use a 4" hole saw and slightly increase diameter a bit with a drywall saw just working the edges), grab the snake the line voltage cable through the hole from above, connect it to the built in plugs in the fixture box - no wire nuts required. Push the code box back into the ceiling, connect the cannon plug, and slide the fixture into the hole holding the spring tabs up - then released ... like magic - zero failures in three years. $10 each!

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

And, these gimbaled lights for cans ... shows unavailable now, but probably just slight model change ... high quality, no failures in three years - fixes the problem when builders or unaware owners install standard can lights on vaulted ceilings.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
So can you usually dismount the old can lights from below?

I have replacement LED ones that supposedly can be installed from below.

Don't really want to go into a truss attic with blown cellulose insulation everywhere.
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Old 04-27-2021, 03:36 PM   #356
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So can you usually dismount the old can lights from below?

I have replacement LED ones that supposedly can be installed from below.

Don't really want to go into a truss attic with blown cellulose insulation everywhere.
Many can be dismounted from below but it depends on how they were installed. If they were installed when the house was built they may be nailed to the studs, you might be able to remove these by pushing up on the fixture from below to break it loose (turn circuit breaker off). If they were installed after the drywall was up they are probably just held in by clips connected to the drywall, just need a screwdriver to release the clips and it will drop down.
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Old 05-06-2021, 05:29 PM   #357
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Here's one for throwback Thursday, but I intend to build two more corners like this - one opposite the one pictured to extend a closet and the other in the kitchen to turn a 36" space intended for the old ranges that had storage compartments into a 30" space.

The new corner is on old asbestos tile. I avoided removing the tile, which is attached to the subfloor with black mastic that could also contain asbestos. I didn't want to drill holes through the tile either. All I removed was the carpet and the base molding. I made a base for the new corner by screwing pieces of lumber to a cement block. I placed the base wood side down on the tile and bracketed it to the walls. Not even to studs or blocking, just to the plaster walls with plastic anchors. I wonder how it would hold up to that kicky tool that carpet installers use.

I'm curious how it would be done if I paid a pro.

My method seems ridiculous but I may do it the same way again. If the asbestos is ever abated, that could be a problem because they may have to tear out the corners I built. Still, I'm saving a bunch of money even if I have to rebuild it after abatement. I don't plan on ever getting asbestos abatement though.
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Old 05-14-2021, 03:40 PM   #358
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I finally finished my (partial) kitchen cable hiding project. If I ran it along the bottom of the wall, just above the base molding like the cable guy does, it would have to go around a doorway and the ceiling run looks better IMO. Hollow molding all around everything would have concealed it but there are complications to that. I may run narrow raceway across the ceiling. It enters the apartment through a kitchen cabinet so I put a connection in the Wiremold box to make it easier to detach and reattach.

My joint compound went bad and I spent way too many days inhaling Ready Patch fumes. I won't do that again.
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Old 05-14-2021, 05:25 PM   #359
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Little corner cabinet project.
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