Fraudulent Chase credit card call

stephenson

Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
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Hi All,

Got a call at about 1130 this morning - from 302-594-8200, showing from Wilmington, DE. I was looking this up as the woman continued to talk. My quick look on line indicated scammer, so I listened to her carefully.

Woman introduced herself as from Chase. She had an accent - Asian, perhaps Filipino. No noise in the background.

She asked if I had my card in possession because a $500 Ebay charge was being processed from Asheville, NC. I said I had card and no charges were authorized. I hung up.

She called back - and I listened it out. Rather than saying thank you, we will decline the charge, she wanted the last four digits of the card. I said I would not provide that - and asked her to provide the credit card number to me. She asked me to wait a moment, and then provided the first 12 numbers accurately, then immediately asked me for the last four. I refused. She restated they needed these to refuse the charge. I noted they did not as I just refused the charge.

Back and forth - she continued to ask for the last four. She became increasingly argumentative - this was a clear clue, I think. Major financial institution employees don't do this.

I terminated the call while she was still arguing.

Called Chase and they said - yeah, scam - and assured me that I would not need to cancel the card. Interestingly, their system asks for the last four numbers. And, also interestingly, both reps (they passed me to the fraud staff) had accents.

So, hints:
- called back
- not from a toll free number
- not statement of being on a recorded line
- foreign accent (although this is not a complete differentiator, just a clue)
- wanted a number
- was argumentative
- did not, when I stated I as not going to play, tell me to call the number on the card

I thought I was a bit cautious earlier - but, I am very, very cautious now.

My new process I think will be - when receiving a call like that, tell them I will call the company number - and, then terminate the call.
 
LTF,

Chase did not seem surprised by that ... even though Chase said a new card wasn't necessary, I may still do that!
 
I'm surprised you would actually answer a call from an unknown number. I never do.

302-594-8200 shows on Chase's website, but those numbers showing on your phone can be spoofed.
 
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I've missed some calls from various contacts who worked for a company - usually after the hang up, the criminal crazies don't call back - maybe they have worked that out!

Good point, though.

Just a blanket, answer no calls unless known.
 
A friend of mine noted they are trying to get you to say the last four digits - and recording it - so, they can call Chase and possibly use voice recognition?
 
Creepy.

Saved by the accent :popcorn:.
 
I'm surprised you would actually answer a call from an unknown number. I never do.
I do, but I don't speak. 19 times out of 20, the call cancels, and most times I don't get a repeat call. Once in a blue moon, someone will start speaking, and it tends to be a legitimate call.

I actually think the scammers get annoyed if their line is tied up for several seconds and they aren't reaching someone.
 
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- did not, when I stated I as not going to play, tell me to call the number on the card
There was a scam in the UK a few years ago that used a feature (maybe unique to that country) of the phone/landline system, whereby a call is not terminated until the party that dialled the number hangs up.

Your bank phones and says "Mr Smith? This is X bank. We've detected unusual activity on your card. Now, we understand that people are sensitive to scams, so we're not going to ask for any information on this call. Please hang up and dial the security number which you will find on your card. That way you will know you're calling us".

So you hang up, get your card out, pick up the receiver, hear a dialtone, and dial the number. But the dialtone is not coming from the exchange. As soon as you hung up, which did not terminate the call, the scammers just started playing a dialtone sound. When they hear you dial the last digit, they play a connect noise and a couple of rings. Then a different voice says "X bank security department, how can I help?". And it goes on from there. People are much more willing to do the stuff that the bank says they will never, ever do when they themselves made (or think they made) the call to the bank's security department.
 
good job I might have believed that one but i so rarely answer the phone I might have been safe
 
There was a scam in the UK a few years ago that used a feature (maybe unique to that country) of the phone/landline system, whereby a call is not terminated until the party that dialled the number hangs up.
That used to happen sometimes going back 30 years or so where I lived in the U.S., except it wouldn't terminate if the recipient of the call didn't hang up. I remember one particular unknown caller who called me who hung up, and I didn't hang up, and she got back on the line by picking up her phone and was upset with me for not hanging up my phone to free up the line. I remember she sounded kinda whiny and like she was going to cry asking me to hang up.
 
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UPDATE!

Early this morning received notice via text (normal) of three "international" tagged charges from "business.pace.car" and "PACE Pay" ... two around $50 and one about $22.

Called Chase, they agreed to immediately cancel and send new card. Also noted the first 12 digits are on credit reports, so the criminals are desperate for the last four and the three digit.

Could be coincidence/random, but I'm suspicious.
 
Any worries about the old card when you get a new card?

I got this email a few days ago from Capital One:

"Your card was declined: It is expired - Please use your new card to retry your purchase at PP*PQBids"


No idea what PP*PQBids is, but I never have shopped there and I did get a new card several months ago and have been using it. I guess the scammers have all the old card numbers and just keep trying to use them?
 
I got this email a few days ago from Capital One:

"Your card was declined: It is expired - Please use your new card to retry your purchase at PP*PQBids"


No idea what PP*PQBids is, but I never have shopped there and I did get a new card several months ago and have been using it. I guess the scammers have all the old card numbers and just keep trying to use them?

PP*XXXX indicates the charge came through Paypal.
PQBids is these guys: https://pqbids.com

So it appears that someone tried pay for something/fees from that site having put your credit card on a PayPal account...or if you have the credit card on a PayPal account, they may have hacked into it.
 
Don't even answer the phone. Let them leave a message and then call Chase using the number the back of your card. They are recording your phone call. They are going extract your voice in bits and pieces (i.e last four numbers) and use that later in another scam. They'll make it sound like you ordered something when you didn't. If disputed Chase will hear the recording and side with them.
 
There was a scam in the UK a few years ago that used a feature (maybe unique to that country) of the phone/landline system, whereby a call is not terminated until the party that dialled the number hangs up.
............

That used to happen in North America as well, I recall not hanging up, and I'd hear a person on the other end pickup the phone and start dialing.. Then they would not hear the dial tone and start talking.
They would be pretty surprised to hear me answer them back.
 
Interesting. I recall a few years ago, when one of our Chase cards were compromised and we received a call from Chase, they had the last 4 digits of the card and did not ask us for it. They also offered that I could call them back on the number on my card if I felt uncomfortable about them. So I trusted that call. Now I will always call back, particularly since, if it is an actually compromise situation, the protections in place and having other CC options mean I can handle it in a steady fashion without feeling rushed.
 
I've missed some calls from various contacts who worked for a company - usually after the hang up, the criminal crazies don't call back - maybe they have worked that out!

Good point, though.

Just a blanket, answer no calls unless known.

That's what I do.
 
Interesting. I recall a few years ago, when one of our Chase cards were compromised and we received a call from Chase, they had the last 4 digits of the card and did not ask us for it. They also offered that I could call them back on the number on my card if I felt uncomfortable about them. So I trusted that call. Now I will always call back, particularly since, if it is an actually compromise situation, the protections in place and having other CC options mean I can handle it in a steady fashion without feeling rushed.

Same here. I've been called by a credit card's fraud section a number of times, various cards, various issuers. I've never been asked for any information except a couple of items to verify my identity, and they were always forthcoming about exactly what took place, just asking me if I had made certain transactions or not.

The big thing that put a stop to the frauds was when I resolved to never let my card out of my sight again. I became convinced that every time was soon after I had handed a card to a waiter in a restaurant and he disappeared with it for a few minutes. Since making this change about ten years ago there has been only one fraudulent transaction on a card, so a definite improvement.

The only downside is that I have to make sure I carry enough cash for any restaurant bill, but apart from that it has been great.
 
.....
The big thing that put a stop to the frauds was when I resolved to never let my card out of my sight again. I became convinced that every time was soon after I had handed a card to a waiter in a restaurant and he disappeared with it for a few minutes. Since making this change about ten years ago there has been only one fraudulent transaction on a card, so a definite improvement.

The only downside is that I have to make sure I carry enough cash for any restaurant bill, but apart from that it has been great.

You can bring your CC and follow the waiter the payment register. I've done that in the past.
 
Blanking out the three digit number on the back of the card stopped the fraud for me.
 
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