Longevity Vacations

FIREd_2015

Recycles dryer sheets
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May 18, 2015
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Location
NorCal
For those that want to blow their dough and/or are followers of Peter Attia, here is an interesting article in WSJ on longevity vacations.

"...People who are fixated on optimizing their personal health are pursuing travel activities that they hope will help them stay healthier for longer...Prices can range from hundreds of dollars for shots and drips to tens of thousands for more invasive procedures... A multiday treatment package including ozone therapy, stem-cell therapy and a “fountain of youth” infusion, costs $44,000...Right now there isn’t a single proven treatment that would prolong the life of someone who’s already healthy,” says Dr. Mark Loafman...

https://www.wsj.com/health/wellness...eszn76jcb7t&reflink=desktopwebshare_permalink
 
What does Peter Attia have to do with this? I did not see his name mentioned in the article.



I find the words purge, cleanse, detoxify, and infusion to be warning signals. I'm sure I could think of other words if I gave it some time. When I hear these words I instinctively grab my wallet to make sure it is still there.



There is a medical establishment near me that promises to keep you younger for longer or some such thing. They do a free blood test which is your vitamin D levels and a few other basics like blood glucose. You get a visit with a doctor who then tries to sell you the bigger test package which costs about $500. More tests. Then they offer you various treatments to get things like hormone levels, etc. just right.



They don't take insurance but give you the paperwork to try and make the claim yourself. Good luck.



Have I mentioned the doctor who heavily advertises his stem cell treatments? He has helped thousands of people in my area.
 
I too wonder how this is related to Peter Attia. I would fully expect him to say this completely bogus. Care to elaborate, FIRED'2015?
 
I too wonder how this is related to Peter Attia. I would fully expect him to say this completely bogus. Care to elaborate, FIRED'2015?

I was not implying Peter Attia would endorse this. He is a longevity doctor. The article is about what some others are trying to increase their longevity. The connection is simply the topic of LONGEVITY. There is some scientific rationale behind some of the treatments described in the article. Whether they improve longevity is another question. The article quotes a doctor who states "...Right now there isn’t a single proven treatment that would prolong the life of someone who’s already healthy..." and I would argue this is also true for some of Attia's treatments.
 
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Interesting. So much misinformation on health and aging. That said, I read of some interesting ideas in Dr. Greger's How Not to Age which has tons of references and seems legit. YMMV
 
That is not what I would call a vacation.
 
We have had a different experience with 'longevity vacations'

Our conisted of spending winter months on long, uncrowded beaches, eating healty local foods/seafood, drinking cold beers from time to time, and generally living a life of leisure and relaxation.

The only stress might be deciding whether we will have fresh seafood and salad tonight or will it be Pad Thai or Red Curry for dinner. An ice cold beer or pineapple drink?

It is probably much less expensive and far more beneficial to us.
 
We have had a different experience with 'longevity vacations'

Our conisted of spending winter months on long, uncrowded beaches, eating healty local foods/seafood, drinking cold beers from time to time, and generally living a life of leisure and relaxation.

The only stress might be deciding whether we will have fresh seafood and salad tonight or will it be Pad Thai or Red Curry for dinner. An ice cold beer or pineapple drink?

It is probably much less expensive and far more beneficial to us.

Let me know as soon as you open up Brett’s Longevity Beach Bum Resort. I’d like a room with a view and a small balcony with a cafe table and two chairs.
 
Does the IRS call it a vacation or a medical deduction?
 
Does the IRS call it a vacation or a medical deduction?

Now that's an interesting question. Probably depends on whether you "pad it" with sightseeing and other tourist activities before or after, and how legitimate the "treatment" looks. When I was in Macchu Picchu there were tons of places offering massages. The local guide, whom I trusted, assured me that they were legitimate G-rated massages aimed at the people heading out or coming back from hiking the ruins, which can be pretty rigorous if you hike the trail up the mountains to the ruins. (Our group took the bus.) I suspect that traveling to Macchu Picchu for massages would not be deductible.

I'm with Brett- to me a "longevity vacation" is a change of scenery, good food and drink in moderate quantities, and interesting things to see and learb.
 

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