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Old 01-07-2013, 12:06 PM   #61
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However, the Wikipedia article describes so many different types of kimchi, some with fish sauce, some with fermented shrimp, some with oysters. It appears that the type that I experienced might be the most innocuous type of kimchi. Oh la la!

Anyway, the Wiki article includes the following: "Health magazine named kimchi in its list of top five "World's Healthiest Foods" for being rich in vitamins, aiding digestion, and even possibly reducing cancer growth." This reference seems to be the same as what Braumeister cited earlier.
Oh yeah, you go to the Super-H or Assi supermarkets around here and there's a huge section dedicated to kimchi. I love it! My favorite is the kind with oysters. That reminds me, we need to buy another bucket soon.
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Old 01-07-2013, 12:38 PM   #62
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I am always shocked at the Fish Sauce quantities in recipes. 1/3 cup, 1/2 cup, etc? Wow that would knock my socks off with stink and saltiness. DW (who is Thai, was born in Thailand, lived in Thailand during her youth, and grew up eating what her momma cooked) agrees. DW puts splashes of this stuff in dishes to taste. Maybe 1-2 tablespoons in a big pot of something (like pad thai or fried rice).

By the way, here is a link to the pic of the pad thai sauce we sometimes buy for convenience (instead of making it from scratch): Hannaford | Asian | Maesri Pad Thai Sauce It is $2 for us locally in the asian store. We usually use 4-5 jars if we make a big batch of pad thai for family. 1 jar probably good for 2-3 servings. Of course we like plenty of sauce.
Thanks for that product suggestion, I'll look for it. A local Asian store carries their curry pastes. Although I'm not sure I can find the other unusual ingredients - spiced tofu and sweet pickled radish - locally.

Ingredients: sugar, tamarind juice, shallot, garlic, salt, tomato paste, distilled vinegar, soybean oil, chilli powder.

Oh good - they left out the MSG. I always appreciate that.

I notice several Pad Thai recipes blow off the spiced tofu (some use firm tofu) and sweet pickled radish ingredients, so maybe I should too.
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Old 01-07-2013, 12:54 PM   #63
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Thanks for that product suggestion, I'll look for it. A local Asian store carries their curry pastes. Although I'm not sure I can find the other unusual ingredients - spiced tofu and sweet pickled radish - locally.

Ingredients: sugar, tamarind juice, shallot, garlic, salt, tomato paste, distilled vinegar, soybean oil, chilli powder.

Oh good - they left out the MSG. I always appreciate that.

I notice several Pad Thai recipes blow off the spiced tofu (some use firm tofu) and sweet pickled radish ingredients, so maybe I should too.
We buy the Maesri brand curries too, in the little 4 oz cans usually. Our asian store has a good variety of those in other brands that are similar and cheaper, and we have had good luck with those.

I haven't seen the pickled radish in pad thai locally (or from DW's family). Sometimes I'll see tofu in pad thai. Mostly regular or firm tofu, or "pressed" tofu. This pressed tofu might be the same as spiced tofu? Brown outside, white inside, fairly firm texture?
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Old 01-07-2013, 01:01 PM   #64
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Sometimes I'll see tofu in pad thai. Mostly regular or firm tofu, or "pressed" tofu. This pressed tofu might be the same as spiced tofu? Brown outside, white inside, fairly firm texture?
That sounds like it. I do like it in the pad thai.
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Old 01-07-2013, 01:03 PM   #65
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I am always shocked at the Fish Sauce quantities in recipes. 1/3 cup, 1/2 cup, etc? Wow that would knock my socks off with stink and saltiness. DW (who is Thai, was born in Thailand, lived in Thailand during her youth, and grew up eating what her momma cooked) agrees. DW puts splashes of this stuff in dishes to taste. Maybe 1-2 tablespoons in a big pot of something (like pad thai or fried rice).
Yeah. Fish sauce in moderation is not bad at all, like many people here have said.

Don't you think these salty-food eating people would be dropping like flies from high blood pressure? Or do they have genetic immunity somehow? What's going on? Medical professionals reading this thread, here's a research topic for you.

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Oh yeah, you go to the Super-H or Assi supermarkets around here and there's a huge section dedicated to kimchi. I love it! My favorite is the kind with oysters. That reminds me, we need to buy another bucket soon.
I do not have such audacity. I will stick with the most benign kimchi, thank you. Why ruin a good thing? Even then, my wife gives me a hard time for the salt content of it.
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Old 01-07-2013, 01:29 PM   #66
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I like just about all Asian food except Korean, especially Japanese and Thai. Have been trying some Hmong restaurants that have recently opened in St. Paul--we have a sizable Hmong population.
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Old 01-07-2013, 01:56 PM   #67
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Yeah. Fish sauce in moderation is not bad at all, like many people here have said.

Don't you think these salty-food eating people would be dropping like flies from high blood pressure? Or do they have genetic immunity somehow? What's going on? Medical professionals reading this thread, here's a research topic for you.
I think the typical rural southeast asian diet is rice rice rice hard work rice, and then some rice. Sometimes they get meat or chicken or fish. And whatever veggies they can grow, and tropical fruits like papaya, mango, bananas. At least in DW's family's old village this is what it was like.

It's probably the high levels of exercise and lower caloric intake that keeps them healthy. How many Chinese buffets do they have in rural China?
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Old 01-07-2013, 02:13 PM   #68
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The Oriental people here in the US may have health problems that the natives back home do not have. It's the same as the American Japanese who do not have the same longevity as the native Japanese.

But back on fish sauce, Chinese cuisine does not use it, as far as I know. Perhaps they have another salty condiment. I do not know how much soy sauce they would use.

And this talk just reminded me of a story told by my brother. For lunch, he went to a Vietnamese pho noodle shop with a coworker, who was Chinese. Like many eateries like this, they had fish sauce and condiments like chili paste on each table for customers to season their bowl of pho to their taste.

My brother said that his coworker loved fish sauce, and would pour out a tablespoon and swallow it by itself, and exclaimed "Yummy!". Good grief! You would think one's tongue would shrivel up from the saltiness and stinkiness.

My brother politely reminded him about the health hazard of salt, and this guy said he never had any problem with his BP.
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Old 01-07-2013, 03:08 PM   #69
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There are also some excellent Indian restaurants the closer one gets to Pittsburgh.
If you like South Indian food, the absolute best one (in the whole of USA) is this one. It is near the Indian temple in Monroeville. I would drive 5-6 hours to Pittsburgh to eat there. Try it sometime.

Udipi Cafe - Monroeville, PA
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Old 01-07-2013, 04:17 PM   #70
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If you like South Indian food, the absolute best one (in the whole of USA) is this one. It is near the Indian temple in Monroeville. I would drive 5-6 hours to Pittsburgh to eat there. Try it sometime.

Udipi Cafe - Monroeville, PA
Udipi is one of my all time favorites! I dine there at least a half a dozen times a year and I have taken friends there, too, who have all loved it. I live a half an hour drive from Monroeville....was actually there on Friday getting my car inspected at the dealer but alas did not go to Udipi.
I have been to the temple before, too, for a one-year party for a friend's daughter. It is really stunning!
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Old 01-11-2013, 03:38 PM   #71
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Yesterday I went back to the Thai restaurant and tried the Green Curry. I was told the Green Curry was spicier than the Red Curry. It was pretty hot (spicy) but it could have been hotter for me.

The Green Curry was fantastic! Based upon how good this was I would never waste a penny on the Pad Thai at this restaurant. There are more dishes to try but I think it's going to be hard to beat the Green Curry.
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Old 01-11-2013, 10:47 PM   #72
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Don't you think these salty-food eating people would be dropping like flies from high blood pressure? Or do they have genetic immunity somehow? What's going on? Medical professionals reading this thread, here's a research topic for you.
I was talking with a fellow colleague from china and he was mentioning that he did not like (or liked less) chinese food made in the U.S. He said the food was way saltier (and the chicken here is tasteless). When I see the native born chinese in the cafeteria they typically pile up their plates with tons of vegetables like bok choy and only have a little meat.
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Old 01-11-2013, 11:57 PM   #73
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I have not been to China to know the true Chinese food. But then, I think a large country such as China would have many regional cuisines, and it may not be possible to make a generalization.

About the tasteless chicken, I wonder if they eat more free-range chicken, which might taste superior. I have heard of free-range chicken in the US, but have not had a chance to sample it (note to self: check this out!).

So, not having been to China, I have had the chance to try food in various Chinatowns in western cities like SF, LA, Vancouver, Toronto, Calgary, Portland, Chicago, Boston, NYC, Honolulu, Sydney, etc... The food is generally similar and mostly OK to me. Perhaps I have been accustomed to salty food myself!
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Old 01-12-2013, 12:34 AM   #74
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Yeah. Fish sauce in moderation is not bad at all, like many people here have said.

Don't you think these salty-food eating people would be dropping like flies from high blood pressure? Or do they have genetic immunity somehow? What's going on? Medical professionals reading this thread, here's a research topic for you.


I do not have such audacity. I will stick with the most benign kimchi, thank you. Why ruin a good thing? Even then, my wife gives me a hard time for the salt content of it.
Salt is only contraindicated for those people WITH hypertension. The rest of us with with normal blood pressure are okay eating salty foods.
Salt Causes High Blood Pressure - The Truth Behind 5 Food Myths


I lived in Korea for three years. Korean food is delicious and if you like spicy food it is especially good. I must have had 30 different types of Kimchi and most of them were great. I have limited experience with Thai food but I like to try out different Asian restaurants whenever I can. I could eat Sushi three meals a day.
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Old 01-12-2013, 11:21 AM   #75
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Korean food is extremely salty and they supposedly have one of the highest sodium intakes in the world (a big chunk from kimchi). I would not want to eat a purely korean diet every day. Also aside from fruit, there's not much in the way of vegetables that aren't pickled.

Edit: part of me wonders if the high salt content has lead to lower lifespans in korea vs other developed countries (it's relatively low).
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Old 01-12-2013, 11:55 AM   #76
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According to the CIA World Factbook, the life expectancy is as follows for some countries.

Macau: 84.43
Japan: 83.91
Singapore: 83.75
EU: 79.76
South Korea: 79.30
USA: 78.49

So, they trail some other Asian nations, but still beat the US. Go figure.
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Old 01-12-2013, 01:12 PM   #77
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I have not been to China to know the true Chinese food. But then, I think a large country such as China would have many regional cuisines, and it may not be possible to make a generalization.

About the tasteless chicken, I wonder if they eat more free-range chicken, which might taste superior. I have heard of free-range chicken in the US, but have not had a chance to sample it (note to self: check this out!).

So, not having been to China, I have had the chance to try food in various Chinatowns in western cities like SF, LA, Vancouver, Toronto, Calgary, Portland, Chicago, Boston, NYC, Honolulu, Sydney, etc... The food is generally similar and mostly OK to me. Perhaps I have been accustomed to salty food myself!
Went to China/HK back in the mid 90's. Free range wasn't something most even cared/knew about back then. Refrigeration was accepted reluctantly and freezing seemed to be a bad thing talking to locals. They wanted all their food as fresh as possible. If you made dinner that day, all the shopping was done right before. Chickens were freshly killed within the hour or less, they liked to see the blood in the middle of the bone. I stayed away from a meal in China that was still bleeding from the bone cut, it looked slightly uncooked to me and I didn't want to chance it. We only had fresh kills in the US from live poultry places and only for 1-2 special occasions since the price was 5-10 times more than a refrigerated/frozen one from the grocery store. Even today, the chickens from chinatown butchers taste better, but I don't know how fresh they are (or refrigerated).
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Old 01-12-2013, 01:19 PM   #78
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I am not picky, nor my palate's that fine. I am OK with frozen food, as it does not kill me. In my area, there's a Hispanic place that has live poultry (obviously all legal), and my sister-in-law has served a dish with it. I guess my peasant's taste failed to see that much of a difference. I would need to do a side-by-side comparison test.
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Old 01-12-2013, 02:21 PM   #79
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I am not picky, nor my palate's that fine. I am OK with frozen food, as it does not kill me. In my area, there's a Hispanic place that has live poultry (obviously all legal), and my sister-in-law has served a dish with it. I guess my peasant's taste failed to see that much of a difference. I would need to do a side-by-side comparison test.
Give it a try if you can, you should notice a big difference in flavor. Best comparison I can make is eating reg. eggs from the supermarket and eating fresh eggs from a farm. A coworker owned a farm in Dallas area, she was flying to Chicago and offered to bring me some on one of her trips. I got to try them the same day. The flavor difference was dramatic and very intense egg flavor but a little overwhelming at the same time. Wife didn't like it, said it was too strong for her.
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Old 01-12-2013, 03:56 PM   #80
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This may be a bit OT but DW recently ran across a recipe that required acorn flour (whatever that is) and acquired some at an Asian food store in town. When she got home I noticed it on the counter and picked it up and began to look at the label, Once I noticed the micro print at the bottom "made in chin" I told her that I was not eating any dish that contained this stuff. She plans to take it back (I hope).

I never knowingly consume anything that is made in China. Don't trust them. Plenty other safer options.
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