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Old 04-27-2013, 09:23 PM   #41
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ERD, your stories were fun because it was about your quirky experiences and observations, ... And I share your enjoyment of Korean food! (Even though I live in Atlanta, we surprisingly have a large Korean community, so I get to be immersed in the culture, especially the food, without jet lag).
Glad you enjoyed the stories. And since you love Korean food, let me share a few more things I thought of.

I have read that Atlanta has a large, active Korean community, as does Chicago. I don't get out to the Korean places in Chicago as often as I should, but from my experience, the food really is very similar to what I had in Seoul. Other than the 'excitement' of seeing waiters carrying buckets of hot coals to the table, and setting them on the wooden stairs (something no fire codes would allow in the US), the experience isn't all that different ( the more common places used gas grills, similar to most of what you see in the US).


And in that 'unexpected' category - in Seoul, among the various side dishes (Banchan) of kimchee, pickled radish, eggplant, dried fish, garlic shoots, and who knows what, they served plain old American-style potato salad - just bland potatoes, celery, mayo - the kind you'd get at the deli counter of any US grocery store. It seemed so out of place with all these flavorful dishes that I thought they did it to make us feel at home. But apparently, it is something they picked up and enjoy, so it is a part of their meals. Totally unexpected to me.

You don't have to travel to Seoul for great Korean food - enjoy! And yes, the 14 hour plane ride, even in Business Class, is a killer (for me at least).

-ERD50
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Old 04-27-2013, 11:09 PM   #42
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Other than the 'excitement' of seeing waiters carrying buckets of hot coals to the table, and setting them on the wooden stairs (something no fire codes would allow in the US), the experience isn't all that different ( the more common places used gas grills, similar to most of what you see in the US).
-ERD50
Traditional Korean restaurants in Atlanta suburbs still use coals. Bulgogi just tastes better this way
From what I glanced they have high-tech vents over the tables as well as expensive fire systems (I think using "Clear Agent" similar to what IT businesses have in their computer rooms)

Tangomonster, any favorite Korean places you can recommend? Have you been to Hae Woon Dae?
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Old 04-28-2013, 07:06 AM   #43
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For me travel brings alive the things I've only read about or seen in a documentary. A three week trip to China and Tibet made me realize how much we in the U.S. have compared to a lot of the rest of the world. The overabundance of "things" we have here aren't necessarily things we need to be happy. Just saying......
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Old 04-28-2013, 08:12 AM   #44
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ERD, I've also had potato salad at Korean restaurants. It's like they want to do mostly traditional ban chan, but then throw in something Americanized.

Sailor, I'm the wrong one to ask about Korean restaurant recommendations since I'm vegan. I do like Cho Sun Ok on Buford Highway. Not the best food in the world, but a bargain for lunch: the buffet at Cho Won in Gwinnett. I enjoy Korean hot pot places. Even like the food court at H-mart.
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Old 04-28-2013, 09:10 AM   #45
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Travel in foreign places can be a major drag if no attempt is made to learn at least the basics of the culture and ways of the various places to be visited. IMHO guided tours are horrid. Much of my travel experiences were w*rk or service related.

Alway preferred to get at least a basic ability in the local language beforehand or asap. Getting about is infinitely easier when with a modicum of understanding of the language and customs. Many locals around the world are multi lingual, and will soon switch to a language we both can understand and speak, even if not fluent. Makes for fast accepance as opposed to expecting everyone to speak English.

In fact in many places never initiatated conversation in English. Alway tried the local language first. To street urchinns and other beggars alway spoke Russian. They quickly left me be. Recall a a night dive in Angola, a mixed bag of Iranian sailors, Russians, some South Africans, the odd transvestite trolling, besides the usual collection of night flies. Over the bar was a huge beer stein. German buxom barmaid. I ended up ordering in German, she was grateful to practice native language. By the way, she did speak fluent English and several midlle eastern, some Chinese, Japanese, Togalog haltingly.

I enjoyed the world exposure, here at home rarely ever talk about it to anyoone. Most of the memories are wonderful movies in my head, which I can play at any time and smile.

Would that meke me interesting, doubt it. Since no one would know unless someone who knew me well told them, or some aspect of the travel experience ended up relevant to some conversation.
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Old 05-01-2013, 08:51 AM   #46
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I'm not that adventurous these days, so Sarah will have to cross Eurasia in a bus without me...

Travel certainly "can" make one more interesting, or more boring, depending on their propensity to take pictures of "me standing in front of X" and "me standing in front of Y"...
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Old 05-01-2013, 09:29 AM   #47
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Does Travel REALLY Make People Interesting?

I don't think so. People can be interesting or not, it's how they tell their stories and how they relate to whomever they are talking with that makes them interesting (or, not so interesting).

I remember back in high school, first day of our senior year, two guys told stories: The first guy had gone to Europe for 2 months with his family. Very, very wealthy. Stayed in the best hotels, had drivers, went all different well-known places and not-so-well-known places, met politicians and royalty. But, he was boring (always was), so boring that half-way through his story I felt like hanging myself (easy, easy, there). Anyhow, the second guy told his story of walking one block to the corner drugstore. Nothing eventful happened during his walk--but, he just told a interesting (and funny and perceptive) story about his 10 minute journey. I think "interesting" has to do with personality more than with experiences.
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Old 05-01-2013, 12:25 PM   #48
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I'm not that adventurous these days, so Sarah will have to cross Eurasia in a bus without me...

Travel certainly "can" make one more interesting, or more boring, depending on their propensity to take pictures of "me standing in front of X" and "me standing in front of Y"...
Don't sell yourself short--musicians are always storytellers, in one way or another. Be afraid that we'll show up in that damn bus next May in front of your house!

I guess I travel to MEET those interesting people. I love getting perspectives from non-US sources, although sometimes their perspective on the US are startling. I like folks that lead interesting lives, and who give good reasons for their experiences. And I might even like crazy people, who might be more like me than I'm willing to admit.

It's okay if you don't like to travel, tango. Neither does W2R, and she's good with that. If everyone did, then the planes would be too crowded for us to get good deals on award travel!
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Old 05-01-2013, 12:55 PM   #49
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Don't sell yourself short--musicians are always storytellers, in one way or another. Be afraid that we'll show up in that damn bus next May in front of your house!
In which case I might just jump on...
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Old 05-13-2013, 01:07 PM   #50
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RTravel made Chris Hadfield interesting.....or was it both ways? Safe home tonight, Chris!

http://youtu.be/KaOC9danxNo
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Old 05-13-2013, 01:16 PM   #51
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It's okay if you don't like to travel, tango. Neither does W2R, and she's good with that. If everyone did, then the planes would be too crowded for us to get good deals on award travel!
+1 You're right - - although I traveled extensively when I was younger (not by choice), these days I don't like to travel either. It is wonderful to have the freedom to stay in one place and establish a home.

Some of the most interesting people, to me, are those who have lived in one place all of their lives and know everything about that place, the people there, the customs, the history, the skeletons in the closets, the rumors, where the bodies are buried, and so on. For example, some of the New Orleans Irish Channel "yats"* are incredibly fascinating and I have listened to them for hours and could listen for many hours more. The stories they can tell about the old days here! Whew.

*the word "yat" describes a type of (usually) lower middle class native New Orleanian, with a certain Brooklyn-ese type accent. It comes from their propensity to say, "Where y'at?" instead of how are you, and that is usually followed by "Hows yo mama and dem?" even if they don't give a hoot about your mother.
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