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Old 05-18-2012, 11:48 AM   #41
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Wow! That's my first reaction to the posts regarding my thread. When I looked at the graphic and tooled around the states I just noticed how all the states in the northeast were mostly Catholic oriented. As you move further west that Catholic dominance drops off and I wondered why that was.

I never expected a pack of vultures picking apart the date of the poll or how many people were included and the fact it didn't include Alaska and Hawaii. I would recommend anyone taking a poll in the future contact the Early Retirement.org website to see if it is being conducted in the proper manner.
A pack of hyenas if probably a better metaphor.
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Old 05-18-2012, 02:41 PM   #42
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Also, an automatic rejection is made if any of the women are known to be snake handlers. !

Ha
Don't be to quick to judge the women with snakes, it may simply be an indicator that the area has a crappy cable TV provider...
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Old 05-18-2012, 04:34 PM   #43
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I don't know about this. It says there are 1% Jehovah Witnesses in Texas. I think is see more of them than any other religion.
Yeah but where's the Rastafarians and Amish? Inquiring minds want to know.

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Originally Posted by JOHNNIE36 View Post
Wow! That's my first reaction to the posts regarding my thread. When I looked at the graphic and tooled around the states I just noticed how all the states in the northeast were mostly Catholic oriented. As you move further west that Catholic dominance drops off and I wondered why that was.
Ethnic majorities in the northeast are mainly from Europe, the vast majority of them are Catholic countries.
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Old 05-18-2012, 10:17 PM   #44
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I have no clue about the Rastafarians or Amish but we have a noticeable number of Mennonites in Oregon. I think the Russian Old Believers and Old Order Amish who settled around Woodburn and Mt. Angel have moved on to less 'tempting' communities.
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Old 05-18-2012, 11:12 PM   #45
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I don't think one can assume that unaffiliated = atheist. Just because you don't subscribe to a particular faith doesn't mean that you have none.
Brat is correct. Percentages from the full study, chart on page 15:
Quote:
Unaffiliated 16.1
Atheist 1.6
Agnostic 2.4
Nothing in particular 12.1
I didn't dig into the following to incite the methodology war any further, but it was interesting in that same chart that Native American religions were counted at less than .3%. This article on the all-50-states 2010 U.S. census data gives 1.7% Native Americans in the total population (including those of mixed race).
Census: Native count jumps by 27 percent
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The American Indian and Alaska Native population increased by 26.7 percent in the last decade, compared to 9.7 percent for Americans as a whole.
This means Natives are now a slightly larger minority, comprising 1.7 percent of the population versus 1.5 in 2000.
Another reason not to exclude Alaska?

Perhaps, but looking over the 150 or so individual denominations and scanning through some of the text on the challenge of classifying a "baptist" into one of the aggregated categories leaves me thinking that this is the type of data set that defies firm conclusions on most any level.

Interesting, though. Thanks for posting.
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Old 05-19-2012, 09:32 AM   #46
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Brat is correct. Percentages from the full study, chart on page 15:
I didn't dig into the following to incite the methodology war any further, but it was interesting in that same chart that Native American religions were counted at less than .3%. This article on the all-50-states 2010 U.S. census data gives 1.7% Native Americans in the total population (including those of mixed race).
Census: Native count jumps by 27 percent
Another reason not to exclude Alaska?

Perhaps, but looking over the 150 or so individual denominations and scanning through some of the text on the challenge of classifying a "baptist" into one of the aggregated categories leaves me thinking that this is the type of data set that defies firm conclusions on most any level.

Interesting, though. Thanks for posting.
No way did the Native American population actually jump that much or any other amount. It's just that there are very good reasons to be counted amoung the Native American communities today. That old incentive thing doing that thing that it do.

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Old 05-19-2012, 03:40 PM   #47
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Yeah but where's the Rastafarians and Amish?
The Amish are on the margins, as always. I was in a cheesemaking workshop a couple of years ago with an Amish man, and we had some interesting conversations. He said that since the Amish population in places like Pennsylvania and Ohio continues to increase, the amount of available farmland at a low cost per acre is vanishingly small today. Since they mostly live by farming, the young folk are forced to go where land is still cheap.

He had recently bought property to farm in northern Maine, an area he says is highly favored these days due to being very affordable.

I'd be surprised if an Amish percentage was calculated for this survey, since it was done by phone and few Amish have phones.

As for the "no religion" group, I read recently that this is the fastest growing subgroup in most religion surveys.
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Old 05-19-2012, 05:47 PM   #48
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Thanks for posting that, It is very interesting and a bit scary as well! If we ever do come back to the states I will surely keep this in mind.
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Old 05-19-2012, 07:54 PM   #49
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There is a relatively new book by Colin Woodward entitled American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America.

It would be hard for me to point to recent time better spent than the hours I put into reading it. Came away with a much better understanding of (and tolerance for) those who hold views so different than mine.

Fascinating, too, to see cultural remnants that create conflicts that exist to this day within my family. This even though almost all my ancestors originated from the British Isles and Germany with immigration dates that predated 1850, most into the 1700s and 1600s. Still, differing concepts of family, community, education, religion created differing expectations as Puritan English descendants (Woodward's Yankee culture) married Germans (Woodward's Midlanders) and Scotch-Irish (Woodward's Appalachians) spouses in the 20th century.

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In American Nations, Colin Woodard leads us on a journey through the history of our fractured continent, and the rivalries and alliances between its component nations, which conform to neither state nor international boundaries. He illustrates and explains why "American" values vary sharply from one region to another. Woodard reveals how intranational differences have played a pivotal role at every point in the continent's history, from the American Revolution and the Civil War to the tumultuous sixties and the "blue county/red county" maps of recent presidential elections. American Nations is a revolutionary and revelatory take on America's myriad identities and how the conflicts between them have shaped our past and are molding our future.
Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America
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Old 05-19-2012, 08:53 PM   #50
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There is a relatively new book by Colin Woodward entitled American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America.

It would be hard for me to point to recent time better spent than the hours I put into reading it. Came away with a much better understanding of (and tolerance for) those who hold views so different than mine.

Fascinating, too, to see cultural remnants that create conflicts that exist to this day within my family. This even though almost all my ancestors originated from the British Isles and Germany with immigration dates that predated 1850, most into the 1700s and 1600s. Still, differing concepts of family, community, education, religion created differing expectations as Puritan English descendants (Woodward's Yankee culture) married Germans (Woodward's Midlanders) and Scotch-Irish (Woodward's Appalachians) spouses in the 20th century.



Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America
Looks very interesting. I reserved a copy at library.

Ha
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Old 05-20-2012, 06:36 AM   #51
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I can't look at the graph since I am traveling with an iPad but, although I agree that the US is very religious, I take the 4 percent atheist/agnostic number with a large grain of salt. A lot of people who self report as in the religion they were born in never see the inside of a church and are non-believers or highly skeptical if you talk to them at any length.
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Old 05-20-2012, 09:16 AM   #52
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I can't look at the graph since I am traveling with an iPad but, although I agree that the US is very religious, I take the 4 percent atheist/agnostic number with a large grain of salt. A lot of people who self report as in the religion they were born in never see the inside of a church and are non-believers or highly skeptical if you talk to them at any length.
Likely true, however if we once had a faith, it is often there for us when we may need comforting.

I am thinking that my former objections are quite unimportant relative to need. We, including me, live too much of our lives locked in our heads.

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Old 05-21-2012, 04:26 PM   #53
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Everylady, many thanks for the recommendation of the Colin Woodward book. This is a topic that really interests me and I'll definitely check it out.
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Old 05-21-2012, 07:43 PM   #54
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Excerpts of the Colin Woodard book are available for reading on the Bloomberg site, in five parts:

Woodard - Bloomberg Search

Fascinating analysis.

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