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Old 05-10-2011, 11:43 AM   #21
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I do live a couple of miles from a street called Old Spanish Trail (US90A), which is theoretically based on a routes used by the Spaniards during pre-colonial times. In reality, however, OST was a 1920's pre-Interstate highway concept.
Old Spanish Trail Centennial

Any historical roads near where you live?
There is a large stone marker near the San Antonio city hall marking the half-way point of OST (St. Augistine-San Diego). It must have been fun to travel the roads of America in those days.
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Old 05-10-2011, 02:09 PM   #22
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Not a historic highway, but a historic waterway is located near me. There are still remnants of the old canal locks (flat stone construction) throughout the area.

THE ERIE CANAL JULY 4, 1817
The ceremonies outside the village of Rome on Independence Day, 1817, climaxed years of discussion about building the Erie Canal. Dignitaries and local citizens assembled at sunrise to attend the start of construction. Judge Joshua Hathaway, a veteran of two American Wars, spoke and began the excavation. Judge John Richardson, the first contractor, then turned the earth. Cannon boomed as others started digging.
Benjamin Wright, "the father of American engineering," assisted by John B. Jervis, supervised construction of the section between Utica and the Seneca River. In the first year, 15 miles were constructed. By October, 1819, the 98-mile section was completed, and the first boat traveled from Rome to Utica.
When finished in 1825, the Erie Canal was considered the foremost engineering achievement of the time. The 363-mile canal crossed the State and became the main route between the Atlantic Ocean and the Great Lakes. Western New York flourished with new, cheap transportation. The canal insured the place of New York City as the Nation's greatest port and city, and it hastened development of the Midwest.
The modernized State Barge Canal System, consisting of the Erie, Champlain, Oswego and Cayuga-Seneca Canals, was completed in 1918.
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Old 05-10-2011, 09:53 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Htown Harry View Post
Any historical roads near where you live?
I live just off the Boston Post Road (US Rte. 1), which was the first "highway" in what is now the US, first set out in the 1600's to carry the mail between Boston and New York. In Connecticut, it followed the route of an old Pequot indian path.
http://wheels.blogs.nytimes.com/2010...rough-history/
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Old 05-11-2011, 06:49 PM   #24
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Any historical roads near where you live?
I live 6.4 miles west of US 66. Still a few sections of it remaining in northern illinois.
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Old 05-11-2011, 06:58 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by freebird5825 View Post
Not a historic highway, but a historic waterway is located near me. There are still remnants of the old canal locks (flat stone construction) throughout the area.

THE ERIE CANAL JULY 4, 1817
The ceremonies outside the village of Rome on Independence Day, 1817, climaxed years of discussion about building the Erie Canal. Dignitaries and local citizens assembled at sunrise to attend the start of construction. Judge Joshua Hathaway, a veteran of two American Wars, spoke and began the excavation. Judge John Richardson, the first contractor, then turned the earth. Cannon boomed as others started digging.
Benjamin Wright, "the father of American engineering," assisted by John B. Jervis, supervised construction of the section between Utica and the Seneca River. In the first year, 15 miles were constructed. By October, 1819, the 98-mile section was completed, and the first boat traveled from Rome to Utica.
When finished in 1825, the Erie Canal was considered the foremost engineering achievement of the time. The 363-mile canal crossed the State and became the main route between the Atlantic Ocean and the Great Lakes. Western New York flourished with new, cheap transportation. The canal insured the place of New York City as the Nation's greatest port and city, and it hastened development of the Midwest.
The modernized State Barge Canal System, consisting of the Erie, Champlain, Oswego and Cayuga-Seneca Canals, was completed in 1918.
Speaking of canals - I live near the Illinois and Michigan Canal, patterned after the Erie Canal, and constructed by some of the same Irish immigrants. Two towns along the I&M route are Seneca and Utica - probably named after their Erie Canal links

Illinois and Michigan Canal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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