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Home Improvement Problem
Old 03-07-2009, 02:14 PM   #1
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Home Improvement Problem

Three years age we moved into this new house. Two years ago we tore out the Formica countertops and standard stainless steel sink and replaced it with granite tops and an undermount Corian type sink. That granite company is no longer in business. The sink went bad on us. It was white and it started showing black veins. The imperfections couldn't be sanded out. The company from whom we bought the sink gave us a new one, but now we cannot remove the old sink. Had a granite company scheduled to do the work but when they tried to remove the sink it wouldn't budge. Seems like that granite company epoxied the sink all around and when they tried to break it loose it started stress fractures in the granite. They refused to continue. Shy of tearing out the sink and the countertop, does anyone have any thoughts of how to remove this sink without breaking the granite countertop? The epoxy is 100% around the sink and I'm told that the epoxy is harder than the granite. HELP!!!
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Old 03-07-2009, 03:42 PM   #2
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Loctite Consumer Retail Products | Product Questions


How can I remove epoxy?

Epoxy is considered a permanent adhesive. However, if you need to remove it, apply acetone or Easy-Off Oven Cleaner to the epoxy and let it sit for awhile. Eventually, the epoxy will soften and can be pried from the surface with a putty knife. Remember to test the oven cleaner on an inconspicuous area before applying over a large area.



Re: How to remove epoxy?

these people also mention Lye and heat.


gotta be careful with all that stuff to not damage the granite.


-ERD50
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Old 03-07-2009, 03:43 PM   #3
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There is no easy way. Now if you can get ahold of a high epeed die grinder, insert arbor to hold an abrasive cutting wheel. Cut off sink body as close to the rim as possible. Then use an angle grinder to grind off the reminder of sink rim. Need a bit of finesse not gouge the concrete too much.

It is a very messy dusty proposition. You'll need a lot of cutting wheels. Did I say messy?
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Old 03-07-2009, 03:48 PM   #4
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ls99 - yes, mechanical removal might be the best option. Messy yes, but those nasty chemicals are not going to be a joy either.

I guess the economy can't be all *that* bad if people are unwilling to take money for this job

I sure wouldn't come out of retirement to do it... well, name a $ amount first.

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Old 03-07-2009, 03:57 PM   #5
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OP noted that it is an undermount sink. Might be hard to apply chemicals upside down.

Actually the granite folks should know to not use levers. My guess the had trainees out there. And they do have cutoff saws.
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Old 03-07-2009, 05:37 PM   #6
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Could not the granite be cut as close to the current under mounted sink and an OVER SIZED sink be used to replace the old one? The granite edges could be polished and then the new sink remounted underneath or above (to eliminate the polishing).
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Old 03-07-2009, 07:18 PM   #7
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Could not the granite be cut as close to the current under mounted sink and an OVER SIZED sink be used to replace the old one? The granite edges could be polished and then the new sink remounted underneath or above (to eliminate the polishing).
Well, the granite company I contracted to remove the sink was going to do the whole job, removal and reinstall (except plumbing) for $150. Thought this was reasonable. When they found out what they were dealing with, they didn't want to be responsible for ruining the counter top. Can't blame them. My SIL can do just about anything (we call him McGiver) so I'm going to talk to him tomorrow about the grinding and cutting method. I know you have to watch out for the heat. It can dull the finish. The sink we are going to use is the same as what is in there now (different finish). This sink can be used either as an undermount or a drop in. Wish we had gone drop in to start with, things would be a lot easier. The problem is, the drop in mount requires a larger cutout than what is already there. Don't think there is any way to make that cutout larger. How do you do that in house? Have to stay with undermount for now. If we ruin the countertop, we'll have to start over. Hate to think about that. Forget the cost. How do you cut the countertop off the cabinets? I'll be sure to go drop-in next time. Thanks for all the suggestions and comments. My SIL has all the tools, now to see if he has the guts. I'm thinking about cutting out the sink bowls so he can get up inside to do the grinding around the edges from the inside.
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Old 03-07-2009, 07:57 PM   #8
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After reading this post I did a little experiment cutting Corian with an abrasive cutoff wheel. To my surprise it works but is very dusty and it's pretty smelly. I used a 4 inch angle grinder with a fiber/abrasive cutoff wheel, Lowes sells them.

Another method you could try on the sink is a saber saw with a fine tooth metal cutting blade. It all depends how much room you have to work and whether you have a one hole or a two hole sink. A standard drill bit can be used to make a starting hole.

After you get the sink off the big job will be to clean up the under side of the granite to set the new sink. The trick will be to get a nice level and true surface. Not sure if you have to go back the original granite surface but the angle grinder and abrasive wheel will make short work of any residue but it won't do much cutting of the granite.

Dust will be the biggest problem with any high speed method you use. A nice heavy layer of duct tape will help to protect the edge of the granite while your cutting. Remember where the water pipes are.
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Old 03-07-2009, 07:57 PM   #9
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Get a Fein Multimaster with a flush cutting blade.
You should be able to saw through the epoxy joint wihout damaging the countertop.

Alternately, get a silicon carbide grinding wheel in a 4-1/2" angle grinder and cut through the sink 1/4- 1/2" down from the countertop, then grind the remainder flush. You should be able to do most of this from the top side.

Have someone hold a shop vac nozzle near the grinder to contain most of the dust.

Good luck.
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Old 03-07-2009, 08:08 PM   #10
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Another method you could try on the sink is a saber saw with a fine tooth metal cutting blade. It all depends how much room you have to work and whether you have a one hole or a two hole sink. A standard drill bit can be used to make a starting hole.
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Get a Fein Multimaster with a flush cutting blade.
Have someone hold a shop vac nozzle near the grinder to contain most of the dust.

Good luck.
Yes, Corian is actually very soft, it's just plastic. Granite of course, is hard. So yes, I bet if you use a blade and run it right through the joint between the sink and the bottom of the countertop (horizontally), you can separate them. That will be a lot less dust than grinding.

This is starting to sound more do-able. Just go slow.

-ERD50
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Old 03-07-2009, 09:25 PM   #11
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Nice thing about the Fein Multimaster is that the blade oscillates, rather than spins. Much easier to control, less mess, and it would be a lot harder to get into trouble. I would bet that it will just skim under the harder granite, and cut through the softer epoxy and the corian sink. Might take a couple of blades, but it would do a clean job.

I'd wrap the edge of the granite with a couple of layers of duct tape or electrical friction tape ( the thick rubberized stuff) to prevent scratching.

Where do you live? This project is starting to sound like fun..!
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Old 03-07-2009, 09:50 PM   #12
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Get a Fein Multimaster with a flush cutting blade.
Hold on a minute and save some money. The Multimaster is a great tool but very expensive. For many years it was the only oscillating tool of its type, it was patented, and they could name their price. The patent expired last year and now many good competitors are available for less than 1/2 the price.

Kinda wimpy but available at Lowes: Dremel Multi-Max
Bosch makes one, too
My favorite: Rockwell SonicCrafter (Available at Menards and online)
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Old 03-07-2009, 10:41 PM   #13
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My favorite: Rockwell SonicCrafter (Available at Menards and online)
Good link, samclem. Never saw these before- no Menards in AZ...

Wonder if their accesories will fit the Fein multimaster? A quick scan looks like these are half price.
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Old 03-08-2009, 12:07 AM   #14
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When you go to hang the new undercounter sink pick up some of these hangers to make your life easier: Loath my Fein tool BTW. Unconscionably overpriced consumable blades, poor attachment for same.
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Old 03-08-2009, 12:21 AM   #15
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how about just seeing if you can redo the sink finish?
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Old 03-08-2009, 09:06 AM   #16
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I'm with Crabby Jerry... just fix the problem of the surface.

We had a whole bathroom redone with Miracle Method
Bathtub Refinishing, Countertop Refinishing, and Ceramic Tile Refinishing by Miracle Method
and they did an amazing job that seems to be quite durable.
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Old 03-08-2009, 09:28 AM   #17
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I'm with Crabby Jerry... just fix the problem of the surface.

We had a whole bathroom redone with Miracle Method
Bathtub Refinishing, Countertop Refinishing, and Ceramic Tile Refinishing by Miracle Method
and they did an amazing job that seems to be quite durable.
Considered this. Called a couple refinishing contractors but they would not warrant their work for longer than six months on kitchen sinks. Bathtubs and shower enclosures are no problem. When you start putting pots and pans and utensils in the sink, contractors say they can cut and scrape and ruin the finish. I would have liked to try this but my wife says she doesn't want a "painted" sink. Some great ideas out there though and I'm going to talk today to my SIL. Thanks for all the response and ideas.
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Old 03-08-2009, 10:55 AM   #18
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Loath my Fein tool BTW. Unconscionably overpriced consumable blades, poor attachment for same.
$50 plus shipping?
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Old 03-08-2009, 11:04 AM   #19
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$50 plus shipping?
Spendy present from tool borrowing BIL who lives in next block. Selling would be bad juju. Actually going to try it out again this morning under a friend's kitchen sink on the plywood cabinet back - cutout for the electric outlet is too small to remove the outlet cover. Installing a new dishwasher.
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Old 03-08-2009, 11:28 AM   #20
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Spendy present from tool borrowing BIL who lives in next block. Selling would be bad juju. Actually going to try it out again this morning under a friend's kitchen sink on the plywood cabinet back - cutout for the electric outlet is too small to remove the outlet cover. Installing a new dishwasher.
I wonder if the Rockwell accessories will fit it? I agree, the Fein blades are obscenely priced. Two Fein carbide blades and you have almost purchased the Rockwell tool. Hopefully the competition will drive their prices down to where they should be- $5-$10/blade would be reasonable.

Good luck with the project.

(You could cut his sink loose while you are under there to test the theory for Johnnie36..)
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