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Old 02-24-2014, 02:42 PM   #41
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I like the new roof option. That's what I did, but with reused tiles.

My other thought was to "repair" half the roof this year and the other half next year. Reusing the tiles should save quite a bit, and doing it in small sections might avoid code problems.
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Old 02-24-2014, 03:14 PM   #42
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New roof or reusing the old roof are both good options in my humble opinion (as an Architect). I have concrete tile on my house but haven't had the issue you describe--although I know about it and it is common. Sounds like the substrate is damaged but the tiles themselves are good (with the exception of some fading is that correct?).

Thus I see two options.

Option 1--cleanest and (again in my opinion the better of the two) replace the substrate and put all new tiles on the roof. Verify by any means you need to that they install the flashing, etc per manufacturers recommendations and no short cuts. Doing this you should be good for many years to come.

Option 2--take off tiles and replace substrate and flashings and reinstall the existing roof. If they are in good enough shape this would work and your HO should have no issue with this as you are fixing the issue and the issue isn't the tiles themselves. But I think the labor involved with doing this (unless you did it yourself) might not offset demo and replacing the tiles. Taking the tiles off will likely result in many broken and cracked ones, and matching them in their faded condition will be iffy at best.

We had our tile roof cleaned last year and we had a few cracked tiles, and the roofer replaced them from the tile graveyard. Evidently the issue you outlined is common enough that he has a buddy who tears off old tile roofs and has a big stockpile of the tiles. So our roofer was able to find a match on our tiles which are no longer manufactured.

I had a similar dilemma last year on our siding. Our house was originally built with LP siding (the one that failed many years ago)--the original homeowner just pocketed the cash he got from the settlement and just did lots of painting to keep the issue at bay. I was debating just repainting or replacing the siding, and ultimately opted to tear off the old siding and replace it with hardi-plank. No regrets at all. I am so much happier with the new siding, it looks great and will last for years. Nice to see no damage under the LP siding as his paint glop repair did the job and kept the water out (not a method I would recommend though!).

Good luck and hope you enjoy the new roof!
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Old 02-24-2014, 08:47 PM   #43
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While considering your issue, I found this repair technique to be interesting.

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Old 02-25-2014, 09:00 AM   #44
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While considering your issue, I found this repair technique to be interesting.
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Old 02-25-2014, 10:34 AM   #45
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I've been researching roofing for my new house. The ice dam material is supposed to be gooey enough to seal shingle nails. In ice dam country they only put this stuff on the first four feet of the roof, but I also read that it can be used either under the felt or in place of the felt. If nail holes are a problem you might want to ask the contractors about it.
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Old 02-25-2014, 11:06 AM   #46
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I've been researching roofing for my new house. The ice dam material is supposed to be gooey enough to seal shingle nails. In ice dam country they only put this stuff on the first four feet of the roof, but I also read that it can be used either under the felt or in place of the felt. If nail holes are a problem you might want to ask the contractors about it.
On our house we put ice and water shield over the whole roof. The additional cost was minimal (a couple hundred $ IIRC) and our builder felt (and I agreed) that it makes the roof last longer and reduces the chance of leaks. Did the same for my Mom's roofs.
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Old 04-23-2014, 04:55 PM   #47
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The reroof project kicked off Monday, phase 1 finished today. They cut out and replaced around 550 sf of rotted decking and reinforced 40 feet of framing. Stripped down to the deck it was obvious the roof was unrepairable. I watched most of the work, it's also pretty clear why it costs so much and where the roofers cut back to save.

Needless to say, I feel much better about going ahead with this and also my with my choice of roofer.
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Old 04-23-2014, 05:04 PM   #48
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I feel much better about going ahead with this and also my with my choice of roofer.
That's good - very good. With the bucks you're parting with for a new roof, it would really be a bummer to learn a repair job was all that was needed.
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Old 05-14-2014, 04:06 PM   #49
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Update

We have a new roof. The final inspection was yesterday. Still need to do some painting and put up gutters, thatíll take place over the next week or so, depending on weather.

The repair needed was far greater than anyone suspected. About 20% of the roof decking and half the fascia was cut out and replaced, the rot extended into the frame in three places - a contractor was needed to do that work, which took another week and a half. Since the project began we discovered two new leaks in the ceiling around a skylight.

The problem was a combination of bad flashings and waterproof underlay that had passed its life expectancy and was completely disintegrated in some areas. The tiles last forever but the wood and other materials definitely do not. I watched most of the work (one advantage of being retired!) and saw where a roofing contractor could cut corners to get to a lower price. It is probably something that would only make a difference 10 years down to road or so, but Iím happy with the choice we made, and if we're lucky the roof should last as long as we do. It is definitely safer from hurricanes, as it was brought up to recent code, and we should save a few $$ on the insurance bill.

We now sleep drier and a bit safer.
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Old 05-14-2014, 04:43 PM   #50
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Wonderful! I can especially appreciate the advantages of having a new roof that is up to modern hurricane standards. That is a huge advantage and adds to the value of your home.
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Old 05-14-2014, 04:49 PM   #51
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Glad it worked out even better than expected. Safe, dry sleep is good...
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Old 05-14-2014, 09:18 PM   #52
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Safe, dry sleep is good...
Yup. Nothing says luxury like an intact roof overhead. One of those things people don't think about until it stops doing what it's supposed to do.
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