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Old 01-15-2008, 09:37 AM   #21
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Yep, definitely peaked at 15. But that 3 line drawing was actually beautiful in it's simplicity.

Hate rap and hip-hop. Seems every black con in the joint thinks he's a rap star. They walk the compound talking their vitriolic hate lyrics and their "look at how bad/dangerous I am" crap all the time.

As was previously said, it ain't music, and they can't sing.

Now Reggae,,,,,I have started to make a weekly appearance at the indoor rec just to hear the Reggae band practice. The reggae and the hard rock bands are both pretty good.
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Old 01-15-2008, 09:54 AM   #22
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This topic reminds me of an arguement I once got into with an english professor in High School. One day the professor explained to the class what it was that made a novel considered a "great work" of literature. He explained that the novel had to be written in a certain style, needed to be over a certain number of years old, some of the worlds most learned professors needed to discuss and vote on it, and only then can that novel be considered a "great work" of literature.
I remember thinking about that for a few, raised my hand and told him I disagreed with him. So he asked me what I thought made a great work of literature. He was very pompous about how he asked it too... extremely eliteist attitude. So I told him, "A great work of literature is exactly the same as a great painting, or sculpture, or really good joke I heard yesterday. It has exactly one person in all the world to prove itself to, and that would be me. I, and I alone have the power and authority to determine for myself, what is beautiful and what is ugly. What is inspiring, or what is depressing. What is great... and what is crap. And not you, or 1000 of the most learned professors who have ever lived can ever tell me otherwise! Art in any form is an opinion, and never a fact." Let's just say that his reaction was less then positive. But I will wager he will never forget about the 16 year old student that crumbled his whole world in less then 5 minutes one day in class
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Old 01-15-2008, 11:23 AM   #23
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
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The Picasso story/myth I hear a lot is this:

A woman asks Picasso to draw something for her on a napkin. He puts down a few lines, and says "That will be $10,000."

"What!" says the woman, "That only took you five seconds to draw."

"No, that took me 40 years to draw."

--------------------

BTW, know why God created rap music? So that country western fans would have something to look down on.
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Old 01-15-2008, 01:47 PM   #24
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
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Originally Posted by TromboneAl View Post
The Picasso story/myth I hear a lot is this:

A woman asks Picasso to draw something for her on a napkin. He puts down a few lines, and says "That will be $10,000."

"What!" says the woman, "That only took you five seconds to draw."

"No, that took me 40 years to draw."

--------------------

BTW, know why God created rap music? So that country western fans would have something to look down on.
Think that is the story i heard applied to the three line drawing. And BTW - nice way to bring that drawing into 2008 USA format. Although it's also kind of classic Rubenesque...
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Old 01-15-2008, 02:12 PM   #25
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I heard a slightly diffrent story...

I was recently on a tour in Barcelona and the tour guide told this story... Picasso was in a restaurant and doodling on his napkin. When it came time to pay the bill the restaurant owner who was a big fan of Picasso, said "There is no need for you to pay the bill, just please sign this napkin". Picasso looked at the restaurateur and stated "sir, I wish to pay for my meal not purchase the entire restaurant".
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Old 01-16-2008, 11:33 AM   #26
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Jazzy thread. It touches on one of the things w*rk is keeping me from, or at least restricting me, a passion for art and art history. Recently a co-worker came to me to say there was an exhibit at the MoMA that I would have to see, she wanted to discuss it as I was the only one she knows who would get excited about it. Picasso’s vast oeuvre, according to this thread may be an acquired taste, you think? He isn’t one of my favorites but there is no way to avoid him either culturally, historically, etc. etc. The exhibit which I attended twice with extreme joy, was about American artists who were directly influenced by him.... ERD50, your mention of the Chicago Art Institute gets me drooling. Where do they keep the Seurat now? Top of the stairs?
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Old 01-16-2008, 12:02 PM   #27
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ERD50, your mention of the Chicago Art Institute gets me drooling. Where do they keep the Seurat now? Top of the stairs?
I don't recall where it is exactly, but I don't think they have moved it in my lifetime. But the 'La Grande Jatte' is definitely another 'must see' on every visit. It's so large, you can hardly miss it!


Georges Seurat (French, 1859-1891)
A Sunday on La Grande Jatte -- 1884, 1884-86
Oil on canvas, 81 3/4 x 121 1/4 in. (207.5 x 308.1 cm)
Helen Birch Bartlett Memorial Collection, 1926.224
Gallery 205


I'm pretty ignorant when it comes to art, but the impressionists at the Art Institute always 'touch' me somehow. Manet, Monet, Pissarro, Lautrec, Renoir, Gauguin, Cassat, Van Gogh - what a list...






-ERD50

edit/add: view them all here: Art Explorer: Impressionist and Postimpressionist Images and Resources of the Art Institute of Chicago's Collection

but much better in person!
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Old 01-16-2008, 02:42 PM   #28
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All of this discussion about painting inspired me. Today I touched up a wall that had been looking pretty bad.
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Old 01-16-2008, 03:47 PM   #29
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I love this topic! I absolutely love the Renaissance masters...but I paint in an abstract/modern genre. I didn't like Picasso either when I studied him in college; but I have learned to appreciate him as I got older. Anyone who can see something differently, paint it, and change the norm gets my respect.
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Old 01-16-2008, 04:20 PM   #30
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A lot of modern art leaves me cold also. But, that is one of the great things about art, music, etc. What one person things is trash, the next might think is the greatest thing ever.
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Old 01-17-2008, 03:33 AM   #31
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I studied a lot of art.. and never really liked Picasso either (tho' I did have a poster in college of that café scene). I do appreciate the fact that he was capable of the basics and then took risks pushing the envelope, paving the way for a lot of 'modern' art culminating in conceptual art a la Yoko Ono (from memory so paraphrasing one of her art 'koans' here: "Write the book of your life. Write it in your own blood. Keep writing until you die.").

I appreciate very little of the current art scene, since it seems to continue to be largely based on such concepts which are now so widespread as to fall to the level of gimmicks. The first time someone presented a urinal, or an all-white canvas, it was intriguing and provocative given the context of that era; the second and third and 100th time.. who cares? Jenny Holzer and Barbara Kruger created quite a buzz when I was in college.. but uh.. what have they done for us lately? To my mind a lot of today's artists only rely on "concepts" and skip the "art" part.. proceeding directly to 'craft' and mass-market fabrication. Kruger's art, once mildly interesting and provocative, instantly became the lingua franca of every punkzine and is now quite mainstream. Unlike even the slightest of Picasso's sketches, anyone can do it.

The things that puzzle me most are the 'installations'.. I don't think I've ever seen an 'installation' that made me think "cool!" or "wow!". I don't know who 'buys' them.. though I know they are sometimes sold. Once you do "Broken Kilometer" (a Km of metal rod chopped up and arranged neatly on the floor.. what's next? "Broken Mile"? "Broken Fathom"?

If you have $250 burning a hole in your pocket (aside from plane fare) you can go see this:
Walter De Maria: Lightning Field

Here's a room filled with dirt:
Walter De Maria: The New York Earth Room

Oy.

This cracks me up:
Quote:
"Broken Kilometer" is a companion piece to "Vertical Earth Kilometer" which consists of a brass rod one kilometer long buried vertically in the ground outside the Museum Fridericianum in Kassel for Documenta VI in 1977. This piece is impossible to see beneath the ground, therefore the reality of the rod pierced through the earth for one kilometer needs to be taken on faith.

Other works made by Walter de Maria which need faith to believe their dimensions are his earth rooms. Walter de Maria has made three earth rooms during his career so far. His first was called "50 m3 Level Dirt" made in 1968 which filled the Friedrich's Munich Gallery with dirt to a depth of one meter. It was impossible to view the entire gallery space to see if it was entirely covered, for the viewer could only see it from the doorway. The viewer had to either imagine the work or just simply believe that it did exist as described.
AE160D Unit 13: Walter de Maria

Uncle Honey.. those Chiluly pieces are wild.. the chandelier-types are your canonical Venetian chandelier on acid.

Venetian (Murano) blown-glass chandelier
although even the 'normal' ones are pretty trippy (as above) .. and yes, I have seen these things in people's houses. Can't imagine how they clean them!
Are you referencing a particular object of his at your link? Or are you saying the whole school itself is his best 'creation'? I agree passing on rare skills and techniques is priceless and quite admirable!!

Even Renaissance masters used studio workers, so that's nothing particularly new. Nor is self-promotion and politicking. Even in Murano, many of the low-priced, accessible gee-gaws sold in the studios are now produced, erm, "somewhere to the East" of Murano.
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Old 01-17-2008, 08:00 AM   #32
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I love Picasso.

From this:


To:
Attached Images
File Type: jpg guernica.jpg (85.5 KB, 4 views)
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Old 01-17-2008, 08:09 AM   #33
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I prefer Mona Lisa Lost Her Smile by the GREAT David Allen Coe.


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Old 01-17-2008, 08:27 AM   #34
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There is something for everybody in , which might even be considered a form of art in itself.
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Old 01-17-2008, 08:50 AM   #35
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Are you referencing a particular object of his at your link? Or are you saying the whole school itself is his best 'creation'? I agree passing on rare skills and techniques is priceless and quite admirable!!

Even Renaissance masters used studio workers, so that's nothing particularly new. Nor is self-promotion and politicking. Even in Murano, many of the low-priced, accessible gee-gaws sold in the studios are now produced, erm, "somewhere to the East" of Murano.
The school will probably be his legacy to the world long after he is gone, much more so than his glass.
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Old 01-17-2008, 10:34 AM   #36
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Here's a room filled with dirt:
Walter De Maria: The New York Earth Room
Wow, my house is a work of art...
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Old 01-17-2008, 10:47 AM   #37
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Wow, my house is a work of art...
Of course it is, "we are all 'artists.'"
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Old 01-17-2008, 01:19 PM   #38
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i think it makes a big difference as to whether or not you look at one piece or a portfolio of the artist's work.

to look at one piece of chihuly you might say, "what the hell is that?". but to visit one of his installations as i have done at fairchild tropical garden, you might say, "wow. that's pretty cool." and then i watched a pbs special showing his process and i'm ready to fire up some glass of my own.

i very much enjoyed a picasso retrospective presented by his daughter at the miami museum of art maybe 10 years ago already but it has stuck with me. there must have been at least two levels of the museum devoted to his paintings, drawings, sketches and if i remember right some sculpture. whether or not you like it, the talent of the guy can not be denied.

unlike, say, a one hit guy, like american pie. great song, but how much talent was really there is debatable.
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Old 01-17-2008, 01:43 PM   #39
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Chihuly's bowl shapes strongly remind me of Georgia O'Keefe:


Chihuly:



Maybe it's just the whole concave/folds/female thing, but i gotta think Chihuly was strongly influenced by one of my favorite artists. And i like the work he directs too.
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Old 01-17-2008, 05:27 PM   #40
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The bowls were my fave, too.. but not the primary color ones, this one:
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