Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-25-2009, 11:19 AM   #121
Moderator Emeritus
Rich_by_the_Bay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 8,827
Quote:
Originally Posted by old woman View Post
I am indecisive about retirement. I am 61 and find I don't have anything I really want to do. I have been a housewife and hated it. I get time with my family on weekends and holidays so wouldn't see them weekdays anyhow. I do pretty much the same things at work as I would at home. I check some financial sites and play with some spreadsheets, then the last 1.25 hours I sit at the reception desk and play games. Everyone is nice and the work isn't hard and with profit sharing I get almost 70K for just showing up as well as medical insurance. So I will keep showing up until something happens. If I dread going to work I will retire. If my boyfriend retires and we want to move farther away I will retire. I have 423K saved for retirement and figure at 500K I could retire. I could work part time or start a little business to support myself until my portfolio grew but I like my job well enough and they pay me better than part time or self employment. I just like knowing if they fired me I would be fine so I don't need to stress at all.
Sounds like you are very comfortable with your overall situation -- good for you.

Your work seems to lack the fierce toxicity and tedium that so many experience over the years. If it provides you with a comfortable way to fill your day while bringing in some discretionary income, why not? You can quit any time you wish. FI really is nice, huh?
__________________

__________________
Rich
San Francisco Area
ESR'd March 2010. FIRE'd January 2011.

As if you didn't know..If the above message contains medical content, it's NOT intended as advice, and may not be accurate, applicable or sufficient. Don't rely on it for any purpose. Consult your own doctor for all medical advice.
Rich_by_the_Bay is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 12-25-2009, 11:24 AM   #122
Recycles dryer sheets
shotgunner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 454
The author is trying to do one thing, attract readers. His points of view will find an audience with those at or approaching retirement age who can't retire because they failed to prepare for it or were devastated in the market in 2008. This validates their position in life not ours.
__________________

__________________
Never surrender what you really want for what you want right now.
shotgunner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2009, 05:42 AM   #123
Confused about dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 7
When I get up in the mornings I decide if I want to ride my motorcycle, read a good book, meet friends for breakfast or lunch, take a day adventure trip or just roll over and sleep in. The only word to describe retirement is FREEDOM to make the choice yourself.
__________________
airman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2009, 10:19 AM   #124
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 2,056
I made a little crack about early retirement this morning, and got the whole "Why would you want to retire? What would you do with yourself? You'd miss it here, the whole team dynamic and everything!" canned routine. I just sort of rolled my eyes and kept my mouth shut. I didn't want to say that the whole "team dynamic" has almost made me quit my job on several occasions. :-P

While visiting my Mom and stepdad for Christmas, my Mom let it slip that she's putting off retirement another year. Originally she was going to bail in January '09, at the age of 60. Then they threw a whole lot of money at her to get her to stay another year. Well, that year's almost up, and she's decided to stay on yet ANOTHER year! I think she's just afraid of taking the plunge, but she'd better do something soon before she's too old to enjoy her golden years!
__________________
Andre1969 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2009, 11:25 AM   #125
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
kcowan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Pacific latitude 20/49
Posts: 5,735
Send a message via Skype™ to kcowan
I retired in 1992 with a golden handshake, then really retired in 2002. I had made a plan that showed we could swing it. DW followed by closing her downtown office and working form home. In 2004, she ceased to work from home.

So far so good. We have more money than we will ever need but that was not the case in 2002. We are still experimenting with lifestyle choices. It is nice to have the option.
__________________
For the fun of it...Keith
kcowan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2010, 10:03 PM   #126
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Finance Dave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,046
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andre1969 View Post
Originally she was going to bail in January '09, at the age of 60. Then they threw a whole lot of money at her to get her to stay another year.
I think I'll tell my boss tomorrow I'm gonna bail.
__________________
Finance Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2010, 08:25 AM   #127
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Ottawa and Fort Myers
Posts: 488
Once money is no longer the issue, I think the key is paying attention to that feeling in the pit of your stomach when you wake up Monday morning vs Saturday morning.

For some people, in some jobs, those extra years going into the office may actually be richer than sitting around the house waiting for something to happen, and this is likely related to the quality of the people there and the level of imagination of the person.

If circumstances permit, taking very long breaks from the workplace to test your response to the reality of life without the structure of the office, rather than the fantasy, so that if you do pull the plug, you are as close as possible to knowing what you are getting into rather than taking a leap of faith.

We are heading down to Florida on Saturday for such a 3 week test. Have my clipboard and white coat and will be making observations throughout the testing period.

Its pretty funny watching all the type-A workaholics down there trying to learn how to relax and take bocci ball seriously.
__________________
Kroeran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2010, 09:42 AM   #128
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
kyounge1956's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kroeran View Post
(snip)
If circumstances permit, taking very long breaks from the workplace to test your response to the reality of life without the structure of the office, rather than the fantasy, so that if you do pull the plug, you are as close as possible to knowing what you are getting into rather than taking a leap of faith.(snip)
My employer has a pretty good sabbatical policy. My problem is I don't know if I could get back in harness after taking a really long time off work. It's hard enough to go back after just taking last week off! I might use a sabbatical to scope out my future location and buy land there, then go back to the office for a couple of days to clean out my desk before I retire.
__________________
kyounge1956 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2010, 09:29 PM   #129
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Ottawa and Fort Myers
Posts: 488
if you take a month or two and don't feel compelled to go back, you have your "reality-based" answer.

I guess that is the question to put out there....when does the vacation feeling end and reality set in?

How long should one be away from the office to really test your capacity for retirement?
__________________
Kroeran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2010, 10:38 PM   #130
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,925
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kroeran View Post
if you take a month or two and don't feel compelled to go back, you have your "reality-based" answer.

I guess that is the question to put out there....when does the vacation feeling end and reality set in?

How long should one be away from the office to really test your capacity for retirement?
I took three vacations just before retiring, each about 2 weeks long and separated by about a week of work. It was wonderful, and cutting back on the stress that way probably made a world of difference in my mental and physical health.

But just as a vacation is immeasurably better than a weekend, retirement is immeasurably better than a vacation (for those of us who are not conflicted about retiring). It's just not the same.
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2010, 10:44 PM   #131
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,925
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andre1969 View Post
While visiting my Mom and stepdad for Christmas, my Mom let it slip that she's putting off retirement another year. Originally she was going to bail in January '09, at the age of 60. Then they threw a whole lot of money at her to get her to stay another year.
They do that, because it costs more to hire someone and train the new-hire than to just continue with the status quo. First, senior management not in my chain of command tried to find out in "casual conversation" if I would be amenable to a promotion to stay, and I told him loudly with witnesses that my agency didn't have enough money to get me to stay. A few months later, my supervisor actually and literally asked me what it would take for me to stay... essentially inviting me to write my own check. My answer was the same. If a person gives in to that, they may make a lot of money but they may never retire.
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2010, 08:04 AM   #132
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Ottawa and Fort Myers
Posts: 488
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
I took three vacations just before retiring, each about 2 weeks long and separated by about a week of work. It was wonderful, and cutting back on the stress that way probably made a world of difference in my mental and physical health.

But just as a vacation is immeasurably better than a weekend, retirement is immeasurably better than a vacation (for those of us who are not conflicted about retiring). It's just not the same.
I wonder if there is a man/woman difference with this issue of some not being able to handle retirement.

While I see endless examples of heroic efforts and success by women in the workplace, my observation is that under that effort remains the primal hardwiring that values the home and friends and family above the ego games and competition of the office.

Although this is an oversimplification, in a sense, it takes a certain stupidity to continue year after year to place your chips on that one square of the craps table of life, and the irrational single-minded drive of testosterone for the corner office, and I would imagine that those of the female hardware model would be much more adaptable to giving that up.

My wife's mentor for transitioning into retirement is Ina Garten (Barefoot Contessa), who's career involved writing policy at the Whitehouse, owning a gourmet catering business, and now is a domestic goddess, albeit with an internationally syndicated television show that is filmed in her actual kitchen.
__________________
Kroeran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2010, 08:44 AM   #133
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kroeran View Post
if you take a month or two and don't feel compelled to go back, you have your "reality-based" answer.

I guess that is the question to put out there....when does the vacation feeling end and reality set in?

How long should one be away from the office to really test your capacity for retirement?
I'm two years into retirement and it's aspects are still changing. There was a homeymoon period of a couple of months where honey-do chores were caught up, a little travel, and catching up with friends and relatives. This was actually followed by a brief period of anxiety where there seemed like too much time and to little to do. Finally, I settled into a routine, found some new challenges, and learned to relax much more. There is a Puritan work ethic that we've been driven to through out our schooling and career. In retirement some, like me, prefer to shed this perception and slow down. We're talking about changing 30 or more years of conditioning and it takes longer than a couple of months to adjust. Though this might give you a good taste of things. Others want to keep on going hard with new careers and pasttimes. For me it's been a fine new adventure.
__________________
"Id like to live as a poor man with lots of money." Pablo Picasso
roger r is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2010, 09:01 AM   #134
Moderator
Alan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Eee Bah Gum
Posts: 21,125
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
They do that, because it costs more to hire someone and train the new-hire than to just continue with the status quo. First, senior management not in my chain of command tried to find out in "casual conversation" if I would be amenable to a promotion to stay, and I told him loudly with witnesses that my agency didn't have enough money to get me to stay. A few months later, my supervisor actually and literally asked me what it would take for me to stay... essentially inviting me to write my own check. My answer was the same. If a person gives in to that, they may make a lot of money but they may never retire.
Same here. They really do need people of my ability, experience and skills and would welcome a delay in retirement or me staying on part time or full time on contract. But I don't need the workplace to feel fulfilled.
__________________
Retired in Jan, 2010 at 55, moved to England in May 2016
Now it's adventure before dementia
Alan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2010, 07:47 PM   #135
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,019
I know someone who is a technical specialist in a very unpopular area of work. He was ready, oh so ready to retire. In fact, he did, and there was a party. He was blissfully happy. But they couldn't find anyone to replace him, and he was coaxed back "for a few months". It's now been "a year or two". He is looking quite depressed these days as he sees his fun years disappearing.

One more reason to move away when you retire!
__________________
Meadbh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2010, 08:15 PM   #136
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: chicago burbs
Posts: 559
I remember back in 2001 where I actually quit a job (could not deal with the bs any longer). I was unemployed for about 7 weeks. The scary thing was how much I enjoyed those 7 weeks. I felt so relaxed - even some of my friends commented how relaxed I looked. It felt a little bit like the summer vacations while in school even tho I was 46 yrs. old at the time.
However, my wife got a little nervous after 4 weeks!

Hopefully, I'll feel the same way when I hang up the stirrups for good ! Hopefully, in the not-too-distant future ! Got a feeling I won't have any problems with being out of the rat race.
__________________
golfnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2010, 08:38 PM   #137
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
NW-Bound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 19,432
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meadbh View Post
... He is looking quite depressed these days as he sees his fun years disappearing.
Tell him to save that money for a big bad RV. He's got to have a goal to work towards.
__________________
"Old age is the most unexpected of all things that can happen to a man" -- Leon Trotsky
NW-Bound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2010, 06:49 AM   #138
Moderator
Alan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Eee Bah Gum
Posts: 21,125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meadbh View Post
I know someone who is a technical specialist in a very unpopular area of work. He was ready, oh so ready to retire. In fact, he did, and there was a party. He was blissfully happy. But they couldn't find anyone to replace him, and he was coaxed back "for a few months". It's now been "a year or two". He is looking quite depressed these days as he sees his fun years disappearing.

One more reason to move away when you retire!
Absolutely - in fact DW has had 2 companies around this week giving us quotes for a move. No way will I be tempted to stay on.
__________________
Retired in Jan, 2010 at 55, moved to England in May 2016
Now it's adventure before dementia
Alan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2010, 07:16 AM   #139
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by roger r View Post
I'm two years into retirement and it's aspects are still changing. There was a homeymoon period of a couple of months where honey-do chores were caught up, a little travel, and catching up with friends and relatives. This was actually followed by a brief period of anxiety where there seemed like too much time and to little to do. Finally, I settled into a routine, found some new challenges, and learned to relax much more. There is a Puritan work ethic that we've been driven to through out our schooling and career. In retirement some, like me, prefer to shed this perception and slow down. We're talking about changing 30 or more years of conditioning and it takes longer than a couple of months to adjust. Though this might give you a good taste of things. Others want to keep on going hard with new careers and pasttimes. For me it's been a fine new adventure.
You hit the nail on the head. For males, the workplace is often our sphere of greatest social interaction and I suspect that fear the loss. When I retired two years ago, I remarked to a mentor that I would miss my coworkers. He suggested that I would stay in touch with those that I enjoyed, but would also make many new friendships. Pursuing hobbies (fishing, hiking) , volunteer work (hospice), and working one day a week for a cause that I love (animal shelter), has proven him right! I have made many new and exciting friendships simply by expanding my circle beyond my old job. Retiring was the best decision I ever made. Be patient and get involved in things that REALLY matter.
__________________
Hershey102 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2010, 07:28 AM   #140
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
kcowan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Pacific latitude 20/49
Posts: 5,735
Send a message via Skype™ to kcowan
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kroeran View Post
...
My wife's mentor for transitioning into retirement is Ina Garten (Barefoot Contessa), who's career involved writing policy at the Whitehouse, owning a gourmet catering business, and now is a domestic goddess, albeit with an internationally syndicated television show that is filmed in her actual kitchen.
Ina Garten did not retire. She just changed how she gets paid.
__________________

__________________
For the fun of it...Keith
kcowan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
what's in your vitamin case? cube_rat Health and Early Retirement 31 12-06-2006 03:48 PM
in case you're interested Khan Other topics 0 08-30-2006 09:38 PM
The Case for Market Timing doushioukanaa FIRE and Money 17 05-16-2006 02:22 PM
The case for cash cute fuzzy bunny FIRE and Money 20 02-26-2005 10:24 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:55 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.