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Old 01-28-2013, 07:01 PM   #21
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Not intended as a political comment, but from what I've read more employers are now claiming to add PTers to avoid FT hires (and mandatory HI costs). No idea if this might be relevant to your field or not.
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Old 01-28-2013, 07:26 PM   #22
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Often employers don't want to deal with old dogs. Too many younger, smarter ones willing to work PT. Or free. To pad a resume. And willing to travel, be on call 24/7 and do lots of stuff old farts would never want to do. And have a better handle on new technology. And would never complain.
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Old 01-28-2013, 07:31 PM   #23
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I am an RN so getting part time work that pays well is easy .Unfortunately I have no interest in it .

Didn't you mean "fortunately"?
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Old 01-28-2013, 07:36 PM   #24
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I should add that I plan to spend some time to learn about equities and index funds first. I have a lot to learn.
You keep saying this, and I can't imagine what you mean. What is there to learn? Buy an index ETF on the S&P500 equivalent to 20% of your portfolio, rebalance once a year. 15 minutes, tops. Congrats, you can now spend more time in locum tenens or in Latin America.
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Old 01-28-2013, 07:36 PM   #25
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3 years, 1 month and three weeks after walking out for the last time, no desire to ever draw a paycheck again. If the world collapsed and I **had to** (think hyper inflation of Germany in the 20's & 30's) I suppose I **could**. Good LORD, just the thought of it, though, gives me the shivers.
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Old 01-29-2013, 05:26 PM   #26
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My skills (and schooling/training) had left me with little value outside of my last position. Finding a similar position was never something I would contemplate. So, part time w*rk for me was "just for the halibut". I drove cars to the auction and also picked up/delivered cars for local dealers. Kinda fun for a while and then I lost interest.

Here would be my suggestion. Do NOT depend in any fashion upon part time w*rk in ER. If that means you stay where you are for "one more year", that would be what I suggest. THEN, if something well paying comes along and you really want to do it, fine. OR, maybe some crappy paying j*b comes along that you WANT to do (driving cars was mine). Fine. You don't need the money so that's taken out of the equations.

Otherwise, you really lose (IMHO) some of the freedom the ER is supposed to give you. You never NEED to w*rk again if you are truly FIRE'd.

Just a suggestion as YMMV>
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Old 01-30-2013, 06:56 PM   #27
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I've had 2 or 3 different experiences working parttime in ER.

First, I continued teaching an online course in marketing research for UC Berkeley Extension. I've been teaching this course for 15 years, and can work on it in my sweats at 2am if I feel like it. There are time constraints--I need to grade papers etc. on a timely basis. I enjoy it and will continue.

I took a parttime job at a bookstore for the fun of it. Worked almost fulltime during the first Christmas season and then cut back to 2 days a week. Worked there for a year and a half until I got burned out a bit waiting on customers. And my legs were killing me, standing on concrete floors all day long. I still fill in there from time to time, but no longer want to have my life determined by a schedule.

Worked on a contract marketing research project for 4 or 5 weeks. Really liked that because it paid well and there was an end in sight. I could see doing that a couple months a year as others have suggested.

Finally, I signed up to teach two in-person classes in Berkeley. That will take six weeks. I will see after that if I want to do that on a regular basis. I have my doubts--teaching, like the contract work really ties you down. Can't see doing it for more than a couple months a year.

I do love the feeling of waking up and knowing there are no demands on my time coming from someone else. I'm in the process of figuring out if I "need" the "structure" of something to do for someone else, at least for an hour or two a day. That's what I love about ER so far--such a great way to learn about yourself!

Oh and I just found out I will be a grandmother in September! So not planning anything for the fourth quarter of 2013.
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:17 PM   #28
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3 years, 1 month and three weeks after walking out for the last time, no desire to ever draw a paycheck again. If the world collapsed and I **had to** (think hyper inflation of Germany in the 20's & 30's) I suppose I **could**. Good LORD, just the thought of it, though, gives me the shivers.
I have only been retired for 6 months. I cannot stomach the thought of working for someone again! I endured so much abuse in the workplace I would never choose to tolerate it again. I guess if the end of the world came I would work again. Rather than starve.
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Old 01-31-2013, 06:23 AM   #29
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I drove cars to the auction and also picked up/delivered cars for local dealers. Kinda fun for a while and then I lost interest.
I did that for a short time too but the dealer was cavalier about "who do I call and how do I get back if this thing craps out on me 80 miles from Nowhere" and it required getting out of bed before dawn. I am NOT a morning person.

Additionally all we got for directions was a Google maps printout (this was before I had a GPS) and no destination phone # to call in case we got close but couldn't find it. All in all it was not a positive experience so I won't do that again.

That was only one dealer though, so perhaps others treat people better. Or perhaps that's just a dream.
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Old 01-31-2013, 10:15 AM   #30
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Are you looking to find something challenging to occupy your time or is money the motivator? I would think that someone with technical IT experience could find a place in a volunteer organization. There are a lot of great volunteer opportunities out there.
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Old 01-31-2013, 10:22 AM   #31
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I have read some of the older posts by jollystomper; and, I hope to set OP's mind at ease a bit based on my own, somewhat similar, experience and observations. These posts lead me to believe that OP has both significant technical expertise as well as a decent reputation.

After 30 years of remaining fairly technical in IT, I have to imagine that you have some arcane skills that someone will be willing to pay decent money for when they need project work completed. I have been approached a few times over the past few years based on my own experience writing code (assembly, COBOL, PL/I, and some even more obscure languages) on the IBM 390. Even though my experience in this arena is over 15 years old; some of my managers/coworkers from those days still remember me and assume that I could lead projects for them on that platform. Even though I do expect offers to be fewer and further between once I exit full time employment, these kinds of occasional offers to give me some confidence that I will be able to find something down the road if I ever want/need to do so.

I also have an open offer from a more recent coworker for however many hours I want to work in whatever capacity (technical lead, architect, coder, etc.) in his new organization making more per hour (or, per year as salary/full-time) than I do now in my executive role. But, I know myself well enough to realize that I would never be able to limit my hours working for him: We have significant professional respect for each other; he has interesting problems to solve; and, I would not want to make him look bad for hiring me.

My latest thoughts on a post ER plan include becoming involved with one of the many open source projects which I find interesting and useful. I have a friend who is widely considered to be an expert on one such piece of technology; this leads to a few very well paid consulting and training opportunities on occasion for him. This might provide some gap-fill for my resume if my ER is a failure for whatever reason as well as keeping my skills and contacts somewhat fresh and up to date.

In the interests of full disclosure, the closer I am getting to ER, the most distasteful I am finding the idea of any kind of undertaking that will involve time commitments, obligations, etc. So, I may not pursue anything for quite some time.
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Old 01-31-2013, 10:56 AM   #32
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.................. I'm in the process of figuring out if I "need" the "structure" of something to do for someone else, at least for an hour or two a day. That's what I love about ER so far--such a great way to learn about yourself! ......................
Same here. I separated from my employer about a month ago. I'm looking for things to do. I have guilt feelings, believe it or not, for not working. I'm thinking of getting a part time job. Might volunteer at something. I'm going to groups that meet at my church, just for something to do. While working I had the shining happy object in the distance to think about. Maybe I'm looking for another shiny happy object to walk towards. I have a vague uneasy feeling that there is something I'm supposed to be doing, and that I'm refusing to acknowledge it. (Apologies for psychobabble)
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Old 02-01-2013, 04:36 PM   #33
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Before retiring, I was considering doing some part time consulting work. It's been almost a year now since I retired and I've had a couple of part time consulting offers but I'm enjoying retirement too much.
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Old 02-01-2013, 05:38 PM   #34
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I chose not to work once I retired but DH likes "something to do and somewhere to go" so he opted for a part-time job after retiring. He was fortunate that he was actually recruited for a job approx. 5 months after he retired. That job led to a much higher paying position and the monthly required hrs are only 52/month although he actually works approx. 77/month at his choosing. Financially his goal was to make enough money to cover medical expenses which he accomplished this last year and to fund IRAs. So far it's been a win/win but the best part is he can "retire" anytime he wants...again.
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Old 02-03-2013, 01:26 AM   #35
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Your best chance for part time retirement work may be with...your current employer. If you're on good terms with your boss and are fairly sure you won't be fired for bringing it up, then sit down with your boss and tell him that you're planning to retire in a year, but would be willing to continue working for him on a part time basis to ease the transition, yada, yada, yada. If you're a valued employee then there's a good chance he'll be interested in keeping you on for at least a few months to bring whoever fills your position up to speed, and since you know the project and will be up to date with your skills there's a decent chance that he'll also want to bring you back to help out when the project (like all IT projects) starts missing schedule deadlines.
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Old 02-12-2013, 10:09 PM   #36
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How about seasonal, as opposed to part-time work? As in tax preparation...I work full time for H&R Block from mid-Feb through April but have the rest of the year off.

I like to travel during the summer/fall and snowboard in winter, so this fits perfectly. If the OP likes numbers, has some familiarity with taxes//finances (most of us on this board do), and can stand dealing with a wide variety of people, this may be an option. You don't make huge money, but it's something. I've been able to keep the withdrawal rate on my portfolio under 4% for five years of ESR with the income from doing taxes.

Plus if you work for an outfit like H&R Block, you get free education each year that keeps you up-to-date on any tax changes that may affect you personally.

With H&R Block, if you can pass their test after taking Income Tax I training, you'll get hired. No worries about age or other qualifications.
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Old 02-12-2013, 10:42 PM   #37
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How about seasonal, as opposed to part-time work? As in tax preparation...I work full time for H&R Block from mid-Feb through April but have the rest of the year off.

I like to travel during the summer/fall and snowboard in winter, so this fits perfectly. If the OP likes numbers, has some familiarity with taxes//finances (most of us on this board do), and can stand dealing with a wide variety of people, this may be an option. You don't make huge money, but it's something. I've been able to keep the withdrawal rate on my portfolio under 4% for five years of ESR with the income from doing taxes.

Plus if you work for an outfit like H&R Block, you get free education each year that keeps you up-to-date on any tax changes that may affect you personally.

With H&R Block, if you can pass their test after taking Income Tax I training, you'll get hired. No worries about age or other qualifications.

Any health benefit after you're done in April?
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Old 02-12-2013, 11:01 PM   #38
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Nope. Personally, I don't need them as I live in Canada and am covered by our provincial health care system for $66/month. But I did moonlight at H&R for six years in the US prior to immigrating to Canada. The seasonal staff got no benefits.
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Old 02-13-2013, 08:21 PM   #39
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What have you FIRE folks found when trying to look for work in this economy? I know skills, contacts, and age are certainly factors - while 30+ years in very technical roles in IT have given me many hands-on analytic/architecture/design/presentation skills as well as contacts, I perceive (which may be incorrect) that being over 50 may be a hindrance even for part time work. So I'd be curious to get a general feel from folks on how easy/difficult it was to get part time work when you wanted it.
I worked for a while in 2010 and it didn't take long to find work. Look at small web/it consulting firms where most of the talent is contractors. Typically, they need expertise in a product/development tool/language too since the bulk of their work tends to be implementation. Part time work defined as 10-15 hours a week, is tough to find unless you do project management. Getting a 1 to 6 month contract is easier.

I was in NJ at the time, so location may also be a big factor.
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Old 02-13-2013, 09:04 PM   #40
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Are you looking to find something challenging to occupy your time or is money the motivator? I would think that someone with technical IT experience could find a place in a volunteer organization. There are a lot of great volunteer opportunities out there.
Thanks, that is a good question. Money is less of a motivator than challenge. Volunteering my IT skills is something I do today, small things like being "on call" for a community organization to help troubleshoot PC hardware/software problems. or helping to set up home routers (amazing how many folks still don't understand securing their wireless network). If it turns out we planned well for expenses and work isn't necessary I won't. But if we are off and something part-time would help... then money would be a motivator, but not a great one (I'm not looking to get a full time job after retiring from this one ).
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