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Old 04-10-2015, 07:06 PM   #61
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Count me in! No more running for me (can't pound the new hip that hard). I have a camera and a note pad.
10-4! I'll bring some snacks. I think I just injured myself thinking about what it would be like to run 100 miles. Geesh that's almost 4 marathons.
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Old 04-10-2015, 08:35 PM   #62
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A little different perspective on humans and running:



IMO most people who say they can't run or could never run is due to one or more of the following reasons:

  • Overweight
  • Out of shape (couch potato)
  • Never learned to run/breathe properly when they were young
  • Joint injuries due to sports the human body is ill-suited for
  • Damage to lungs from smoking


(note I said "most" people ... there are exceptions to everything, of course)
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Old 04-10-2015, 08:50 PM   #63
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I have a better idea - I'll ride in the support vehicle - bring the split window.
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Count me in! No more running for me (can't pound the new hip that hard). I have a camera and a note pad.
If one of you can curl up in the back of the '63 we good. If not I'll have to bring one of the convertibles. They're easier to fit 3 people.

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10-4! I'll bring some snacks. I think I just injured myself thinking about what it would be like to run 100 miles. Geesh that's almost 4 marathons.
Sorry Ronstar, no eating in the vettes.
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Old 04-11-2015, 06:36 AM   #64
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Congrats running bum on the 100 miler. As for me, I never did any distance running beyond about 10 miles, although I could have. I don't run distances any more, as I limit myself to no more than 3 miles (on rare occasions), however, I still enjoy sprinting. I was always built for speed, and you get a tremendous workout and don't need to spend hours doing it. I'll leave the science on what is good or bad workout wise to researchers, but for me sprint sessions work.
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Old 04-11-2015, 07:19 AM   #65
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Some of us don't have the physique for running-I have short stocky legs, even when I was underweight the hips were big. I went through two times in my life where I took up running as my main exercise: For about a year, end of college, beginning of med school. Developed shin splints when I worked up to 5 miles/day. Tried running again in my 40s, and the same thing happened. I've been 1/2 couch potato these past few years. Getting back into walking now the weather is nice--heading out right after this post. My favorite exercise is swimming. Started swimming for exercise in college. Switched to running. Did 2000 meters/day 5-6 days a week after I quit running in med school. Once DH and I visited friends who lived in the Sierra foothills. We went on a picnic at a mountain lake. The water wasn't too cold, so I walked in, swam 1/2 way across the lake, then turned back. I could have gone all the way across, but then I would have missed the picnic. I was a member at the Y for years here and swam mostly, but time crunch and lack of pool availability due to all the swim teams using the pool became a problem.

We just purchased a swim spa to replace our now defunct hot tub. Will start swimming daily when it arrives in June. I'lll be able to swim outdoors year round, though it might not be so fun when it is 0 degrees.
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Old 04-11-2015, 07:31 AM   #66
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A little different perspective on humans and running:



IMO most people who say they can't run or could never run is due to one or more of the following reasons:

  • Overweight
  • Out of shape (couch potato)
  • Never learned to run/breathe properly when they were young
  • Joint injuries due to sports the human body is ill-suited for
  • Damage to lungs from smoking


(note I said "most" people ... there are exceptions to everything, of course)
Or they just don't enjoy it.
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Old 04-11-2015, 09:39 AM   #67
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Just got round to reading the article OP posted and it strikes a note with what my cardiologist told me a couple of weeks back. He told me that he often sees folks who have been extremely athletic develop A-Fib later in life. A few days later I was talking with a couple at the gym that we have known for a number of years. He used to be an extreme athlete, in the top 10 nationwide in his age group during his 40's, 50's and 60's in Iron Men competitions. He is now 76 and at 70 he developed a serious case of A-Fib and has had 2 ablations and now has a pacemaker.

I'm far from being an extreme athlete and the cardiologist recommends that I keep up my exercise regime which includes 3 or 4 times a week going hard out on an elliptical trainer for 30 minutes at a time. (I used to run and play singles tennis but the joints can't take it anymore)

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But the paper does build on previous research, such as this study in mice, which suggested exercise affected heart rhythm, and other work which has suggested long-term strenuous endurance exercise can damage the heart.
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Endurance athletes are generally very fit.


Yet, paradoxically, they are more likely to have heart rhythm disturbances, known as arrhythmias, especially as they get older - although the risk is still small.
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Old 04-11-2015, 10:05 AM   #68
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I have never been overweight. In fact I've always had a classic runner's physique. never a good distance runner. (Sprinting=different story) NOBODY needs lessons on how to breath when young. I actually lost heart and lung function from aerobic exercise. It's like any other ability. Some people do it better. We can all take voice lessons but how many will end up "singin' purdy" like Pavarotti or Andy Williams? (Or plug in whoever you thing sounds good.)

Medical observations of long term high exertion aerobic exercise being associated with causing A-Fib goes back at least 30 years. That's when I first encountered it. When Bill Bradley the ex-basketball player/senator tried to run for president in 2000 he had some sort of heart related event. It let a little air out of his ball as a candidate. Don't recall if it was A-fib specifically but the association between basketball players and other "high exercisers" if you will, and heart problems later in life was discussed until abruptly tossed into the memory hole.
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Old 04-11-2015, 10:53 AM   #69
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  • Never learned to run/breathe properly when they were young
I offered once (and only once) to teach DW how to run. She said, "I know how to run!" I've been running with her before... she doesn't know how to run.

It's definitely a skill that has to be learned*, and is better learned young. Most people don't inherently know how to manage their breathing nor are they able to exert themselves beyond a comfortable level for any extended period of time. It's definitely something that must be learned.

(*Note: not to say one MUST learn it; instead if one is going to run, it is a skill that takes development and may not come naturally)
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Old 04-11-2015, 10:55 AM   #70
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Or they just don't enjoy it.
There's a distinct difference between saying, "I can't run," and, "I don't enjoy running." Some people say the first when they really mean the second. Nothing wrong with not enjoying it, but everyone can run or learn to... our survival once depended on it.
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Old 04-11-2015, 11:13 AM   #71
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I am old enough to remember when the new "jogging" activity started (coinciding with the development of the running shoe industry--what a surprise). Before that it was little kids (and who taught them how to run? Umm, probably nobody?) and mostly invisible high school, college, and very serious Olympic hopefuls who had coaches to "teach" them how to do it because their speed mattered. It's great that people who like it can do it without people staring at them like they would have before jogging was popular. Go for it. I'll be walking behind you.
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Old 04-11-2015, 01:04 PM   #72
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It's definitely a skill that has to be learned*, and is better learned young. Most people don't inherently know how to manage their breathing nor are they able to exert themselves beyond a comfortable level for any extended period of time. It's definitely something that must be learned.

(*Note: not to say one MUST learn it; instead if one is going to run, it is a skill that takes development and may not come naturally)
DW had never run in her life and she always said she wished she could run but the times she tried she couldn't hack it. Each year we would both go to the annual "Corporate Cup" which was a 5km run (3.1 miles), great day out that both our companies used to take part in. I would run it and she would walk.

At age 56 the gym we go to offered a class called Running 101, they had an instructor she knew and liked, they met twice a week and the course was 8 weeks long. She loved it, learned a lot, took it again a few months later, and now runs 5 miles 2 or 3 times per week. Every year we attend the "Run Through The Woods" event where we live as it is a great day out, but now the roles are reversed, she runs 5 miles while I walk 3 miles.
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Old 04-11-2015, 02:40 PM   #73
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Very impressive. Congratulations!
+1
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Old 04-11-2015, 04:15 PM   #74
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I am a fervent fan of running. I enjoy looking out the window, or walking down the street, and seeing so many very attractive young women wearing those wonderful tight leggings, running down the street. Many of them have excellent form too; in fact most of them do. ( I am referring to running form, not their always admirable, spectacular female form.)

Ha
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Old 04-11-2015, 04:24 PM   #75
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I offered once (and only once) to teach DW how to run. She said, "I know how to run!" I've been running with her before... she doesn't know how to run.

It's definitely a skill that has to be learned*, and is better learned young. Most people don't inherently know how to manage their breathing nor are they able to exert themselves beyond a comfortable level for any extended period of time. It's definitely something that must be learned.

(*Note: not to say one MUST learn it; instead if one is going to run, it is a skill that takes development and may not come naturally)
Oh god, please don't be my sister. We run/jog at a local park. She feels she has to critique every runner that we pass. This one is too stiff, this ones shoulders are pulled up, too much arm swing, foot kicks to side. She thinks I'm too relaxed and wants to know "why aren't you listening to me" when I'm giving you running advise. We're not in a competition. I'm not hurting myself. My podiatrist loves my gait. Why can't this be fun. I smile and nod a lot! lol
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Old 04-11-2015, 04:59 PM   #76
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She feels she has to critique every runner that we pass.
I see lots of runners with what I consider strange form, but I can't imagine myself ever commenting on it. I feel that if my own form isn't perfect (and few of us are), I have no right to criticize anyone else's.

Instead, when I see an unusual running form, I just use it as a reminder to myself to pay more attention to my own.
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Old 04-11-2015, 05:31 PM   #77
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When you have a leg length discrepancy, you can run, but you probably shouldn't.

As a young woman, I ended up with hip sprains - trying to "learn to run" because it was expected of me. Guys wanted me to go running with them. Nobody wanted to go for a fast walk, which I excelled at. Walking? Pah! That's for old people! So I went through all sorts of nonsense - sports medicine evaluations, trying different shoes, lifts...nothing worked. Fact is, I was suffering from a middle-class expectation, not a disability per se. I was not meant to run.

This may be a major reason why I married someone older...none of that running nonsense, and happy to go for a 4-mile, 4-mph walk.

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Old 04-11-2015, 06:58 PM   #78
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I am a fervent fan of running. I enjoy looking out the window, or walking down the street, and seeing so many very attractive young women wearing those wonderful tight leggings, running down the street. Many of them have excellent form too; in fact most of them do. ( I am referring to running form, not their always admirable, spectacular female form.)

Ha
Being passed by female runners while I'm out there on my runs is one of the benefits of getting older.
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Old 04-11-2015, 07:19 PM   #79
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I am a fervent fan of running. I enjoy looking out the window, or walking down the street, and seeing so many very attractive young women wearing those wonderful tight leggings, running down the street. Many of them have excellent form too; in fact most of them do. ( I am referring to running form, not their always admirable, spectacular female form.)

Ha

Open your raincoat. Show 'em what you got. That'll put you in solid.
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Old 04-12-2015, 08:37 AM   #80
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Open your raincoat. Show 'em what you got. That'll put you in solid.
Well someone finally figured out Ha's true exercise, although he professes rowing
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