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Old 09-26-2020, 09:40 PM   #21
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@4nursebee You said you have enough money for wants and needs.

Turn in your notice when you arrive at your next shift. If it's Monday, September 28, 2020 at 8:00am, then that's when I suggest you hand in your notice. If it's sooner, all the better.
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Old 09-27-2020, 07:27 AM   #22
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OP, since you're trying to decide this weekend, you might Google something like "get over fear of retiring". Naturally, 100s of websites will appear. Here's one from AARP: https://tinyurl.com/y5levyam

I've been retired 7 years and love it! It took me about a year to adjust and find several volunteer gigs to fill my need for purpose.
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Old 09-27-2020, 07:35 AM   #23
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I volunteered for a good severance package, but thinking I could be reemployed. After 15 months of searching, I discovered I could retire and by then, there were no feelings about work that I missed anymore. I don't stay in contact with any past colleagues, as I don't want to think of any What Ifs, etc.
Retirement for 3 years has been fantastic and never bored. Sunday nights...just means I get to think about playing Pickleball on Monday.
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Old 09-27-2020, 07:46 AM   #24
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I was very nervous too. Not for the financial aspect though. But after securing excellent Florida Blue healthcare via ACA, we did not look back.
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Old 09-27-2020, 07:55 AM   #25
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I was VERY nervous. But after convincing myself and my husband that financially we were there.... and having a VERY bad day at work. I spent the weekend thinking on it, and gave notice that Monday.

When I bought my first home I was nervous for about 6 months after - had I bitten off too much? But that faded as I realized it was all good.

It was the same with retirement.... nervous that I'd missed something and it was a big mistake.... but that faded as I realized it was all good. 6 years in, it's still all good.
Yes. If you think about it, we all make a big "purchase" when we retire. We are buying freedom at the price of foregone wages.

There can be some buyer's remorse, but that quickly fades in most cases.

I was not worried since I had done all the worrying already in saving to hit my numbers. I was more concerned I might get bored but that has not been the case.
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Old 09-27-2020, 07:58 AM   #26
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Iím three months in and any nervousness is far outweighed by relief from being accountable to lots of people.
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Old 09-27-2020, 08:43 AM   #27
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I had a sense of immediate relief my last day on the job. As a retired teacher the real sense of joy came in mid August when I walked through stores with big "Back to School" signs up and I didn't give a hoot.

I did have two concerns: improving my long term health outlook, and watching for sequence of returns risk. The former I did by eating better and exercising more, both required more time than I had when working. The later never showed up, and I had a plan to deal with it if it did.

But, since I had prepared properly, I was never nervous.
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Old 09-27-2020, 08:49 AM   #28
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Yes. If you think about it, we all make a big "purchase" when we retire. We are buying freedom at the price of foregone wages.

There can be some buyer's remorse, but that quickly fades in most cases.

I was not worried since I had done all the worrying already in saving to hit my numbers. I was more concerned I might get bored but that has not been the case.
Nicely stated.
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Old 09-27-2020, 08:52 AM   #29
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No, not at all. Retired at 59 with a package from my employer.

The numbers were right, the timing was right.

The only thing I was nervous about was how long it was going to be before my employer's downsizing impacted me. I wanted a package and knew that it would only be a short time before one came along. Well worth the 10-12 month wait.
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Old 09-27-2020, 09:22 AM   #30
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Can you take a six month sabbatical? (I would have done that if I had the option.)

This may relieve the nervousness, knowing that you can return.

I strongly suspect that (if so) at the end of the six months, you will decide not to go back; and any nervousness will have faded away.
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Old 09-27-2020, 09:25 AM   #31
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I wasnít nervous about retirement for a few reasons.

Financially the decision was easy since the monthly pension I was eligible to draw became larger than my paycheck at that point. Not going to deal with all the BS of working for nothing!

And before retirement I was working and living (at my own expense) in Los Angeles, 500 miles away from my permanent residence. Rent on a decent condo in LA plus flying back home every weekend was $3k a month. Retirement let me shed those costs.

And finally, there was a little voice in the back of my head that kept reminding me that my father dropped dead of a heart attack at age 56 and never took the opportunity to retire with Mom. I turned 56 in April 2020, listened to that voice and retired on May 1, 2020.

Now getting to spend my days enjoying life with my lovely bride ... just celebrated 33 years of marriage yesterday!
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Old 09-27-2020, 09:56 AM   #32
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Before retiring I had gone through my numbers and "beaten them to death", so I was sure that I was financially ready to retire. Despite that, retirement day was pretty scary and exciting. I imagine that must be what skydiving feels like.

I was quite determined and figured that even if I had made a mistake, I'd make it work somehow.

Turns out that I have done fine, financially, and have had more to spend than I really need. Also my adjustment to retirement was much easier than I had ever expected. I love being retired. But before I retired, I didn't know! I think that big step into the unknown is what was unnerving to me on my retirement day.
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Old 09-27-2020, 10:13 AM   #33
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I was nervous and excited, had a planned date that changed , but was finally set after I sent in my retirement letter.
OP--as a retired nurse also , I get it. You have been taking care of others and their medical, physical, emotional needs for years. It is time to take care of your self!
You state you have the financials taken care of, now its time for you to enjoy the rest of your life! Retire and have fun--do the things you want to do on your timeline. Thats my favorite part of retirement.
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Old 09-27-2020, 10:21 AM   #34
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Overall, not nervous. But I have had a few moments of nervousness in the short time leading up to my late 2008 retirement at age 45.


The first was walking to my boss's office with my resignation letter and handing it to them while telling them I was leaving after 23 years.


The second was a few days later when the balance in my employer's 401k/SOP account dropped to zero but before I received the money, some of it electronically, some it via a paper check.


The third was in 2011, after my health insurance premiums had risen 25%, a year after they had risen 20%, making me wonder if increases like these would eventually bust my budget before I became eligible for Medicare. The ACA had already passed but the exchanges would not become available until 2014. I switched to a cheaper, bare-bones, hospital-only policy for the next 2 1/2 years and hoped I stayed healthy in that time.


Otherwise, it has been great being retired for the last 12 years.
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Old 09-27-2020, 10:25 AM   #35
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We have been fortunate. Our spending has been at or less than we forecast each year after retiring eight/nine years ago.

Our investment income has been more that we forecast over the same period. Partly do to a big gain partially attributable to sequence of returns just prior to and shortly after retirement.

Health has been better too.

I think that the trick is to understand you spending pattens-current and projected. Be somewhat conservative in establishing a future spend and inflation projection and in investment income projections.
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Old 09-27-2020, 11:10 AM   #36
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Nervous? No - unless that's what you call how a 6 year old kid feels on Christmas morning, because that's exactly how I would describe my emotion upon retiring. Sans the green coloring, whenever I looked in the mirror this is what I saw:
I felt like that for about 1/2 year before retiring and at least a year after. I still get a thrill of happiness when I think how lucky we are to be retired for 3 plus years! I hit my number and then as soon as I hit 55 and was eligible for a pension I left.
No regrets about not working, especially now with Covid! My only anxiety was related to uncertainty with the ACA which we've depended on for healthcare.
I was an RN too and have kept my license as insurance incase healthcare becomes unaffordable. We still have 6 years to go before medicare, so I still worry some about that as the ACA is once again threatened. I think we could probably even manage going back to exorbitant premiums, but prexisting conditions could be a problem. But, aside from that, we love being retired. Our stash has grown enough to support 4 additional years of current withdrawals despite the past 3 years of withdrawals to supplement the pension. We likely won't take SS until 70 and at that point we won't need to supplement from savings at all.
No regrets, we love being retired and no problem staying busy even with Covid.
Go for it! As nurse you can probably jump back in if you wish to.
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Old 09-27-2020, 11:44 AM   #37
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Almost a decade now, but I don't remember ever being nervous about retiring. I had enough, money and of work and I was prepared mentally. Maybe partly because I was pretty sure I could turn into a high priced consultant if I wanted to work. I actually had a few unsolicited job offers shortly after I retired which I turned down... I'm to far out of touch with my old skill sets now to go back which is okay since I never really missed or needed it.
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Old 09-27-2020, 01:17 PM   #38
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I stayed on past FI until I was 100% sure I wanted to go then gave long notice. I hung on longer than many on this board (63) but it was easy if not wise
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Old 09-27-2020, 02:00 PM   #39
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I don't remember being nervous. DH retired first and he was a good cheerleader for me. It was very strange to get used to no paycheck, even though we had saved plenty. It did not take me long to adjust though!
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Old 09-27-2020, 03:01 PM   #40
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By the time I actually retired, i was not nervous, because I had analyzed the number to death and was confident I had thought everything through that needed to be.

My wife is just about to retire, and she is pretty nervous, about healthcare. As we fall off her insurance, we will go with either ACA or CORBA. ACA is, well, I would not bet for or against it right now. COBRA is pricey, but we have the funds if we really have to use them. I want to go with ACA, since it is much cheaper, and I assume that no matter what SCOTUS does, it would be there at least until the end of next year. I am not sure I can convince her to do that right now, and may have to pay for the pricey COBRA.
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