S&P 500 Up 126% since last bottom

Chuckanut

Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
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FYI,

Heard on NPR today: Since the market bottom about 5 years ago, the S&P 500 has risen 126%.

Break out the champagne! Or better yet, the home brewed beer. :D
 
Wow! Wish I had gone all into VG S&P index back in 09.....but, I'm still satisfied with my performance. But still :D
 
Heard on NPR today: Since the market bottom about 5 years ago, the S&P 500 has risen 126%.
And that's most likely excluding dividends. Vanguard's S&P500 index fund's five year performance is 19.19%. I calculate that to work out to a 140% increase over five years, and that's not even measured from the absolute bottom recorded in early March, 2009.

I sincerely hope that this thread doesn't deteriorate into a lot of wh**ing. We all know what that means to future returns.
 
FYI,

Heard on NPR today: Since the market bottom about 5 years ago, the S&P 500 has risen 126%.

Break out the champagne! Or better yet, the home brewed beer. :D
I'm showing 170% since the bottom on 3/2/2009. And that's just the price return index. The total return index includes dividends, so add another 10% or so. I feel sorry for the rookies who decided to panic and put it all in an annuity back then.
 
I knew physicians who panicked in 2002 and converted their 401k portfolios to "safe" investments. My taxable portfolio bottomed out at 78K back then, yet it was over 300K at the low point in 2009. My dad passed away 5/2009 and I put the inherited portfolio from him and my own together, sold the majority of his single stock portfolio and put it all in an array of indexed funds and have ridden it every since. I shudder to think where I would be if I invested in no interest rate "safe" investments. Even taking into account the roller coaster ride of equities, they are by far the best way to go.
 
I knew physicians who panicked in 2002 and converted their 401k portfolios to "safe" investments. My taxable portfolio bottomed out at 78K back then, yet it was over 300K at the low point in 2009. My dad passed away 5/2009 and I put the inherited portfolio from him and my own together, sold the majority of his single stock portfolio and put it all in an array of indexed funds and have ridden it every since. I shudder to think where I would be if I invested in no interest rate "safe" investments. Even taking into account the roller coaster ride of equities, they are by far the best way to go.
Doctors are notoriously terrible investors but you kiddo are pretty sharp. Good luck to you and fam!
 
Right on! Nor does anyone else no matter what they say

I know that I don't have a clue about future returns! My crystal ball broke years ago....

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To be honest, I started that infamous "Wheee!!!" thread in late 2007 because I was so tired of reading all the incessant moaning and groaning when the market was dropping, and yet no corresponding happiness when the market was on the way up.
 
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While it's up 126%, it needs to drop only 56% to be back to the same place.
 
Jan 2000: 1498.58
Jul 2007: 1526.75
Feb 2014: 1859.45
?
?
?

It's only 1.218 times the previous high!
 
I'm letting proceeds roll over but new money is going into an MSCI global index. My AA could use some more international exposure...gotta put it somewhere.
 
It's only up ~25% since the 2000 top and ~20% since the 2007 top. You need a 100% return to just recover from a 50% loss.
 
It's only up ~25% since the 2000 top and ~20% since the 2007 top. You need a 100% return to just recover from a 50% loss.

While it's true that oversea stocks (especially emerging markets) have taken a beating, they may outperform U.S. stocks going forward. Obviously, no one knows with any degree of certainty.
 
You need a 100% return to just recover from a 50% loss.

I've never understood people's angst with this simple calculation fact. It's the absolute valuation that is real dollars and should matter.

Flipped the other way, you never hear folks happy that after a 100% rise in their investment they ONLY lost 50% reduction when retreating to the exact same pre rise value.
 
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