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Old 01-16-2011, 03:39 PM   #21
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Decompress? Are you talking about getting the nitrogen out of your system after a real deep dive? Other than that, I can't think of a single minute I have decompressed.

+1 for the silly smile, and that feeling of absolute happiness.
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Old 01-16-2011, 03:43 PM   #22
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Took me no time at all because I had been working part-time for the previous 7 years, including the most recent 2 years only 2 days a week. Therefore, it was not a big transition from working 2 days a week to zero days a week. Working had become a nuisance to my nonwork life so I was simply ridding myself of it and the lousy commute which went with it.
What scrabbler1 said - this sounds like me. You'd think a 4-day weekend every week would be enough, but it's just NOT! I can't imagine it will take long to get used to not working.
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Old 01-16-2011, 03:45 PM   #23
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I remain embarrassed at how much I enjoy lazy-bumhood. This will pass.

Right?
You talkin' to me?

oh..and it took about a year to get all the bees, buzzards and bats away from my head.
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Old 01-16-2011, 05:24 PM   #24
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It took me about a year of just enjoying the novelty of "Hey, all I have to do is keep breathing and they send me money!" But we also moved immediately after retiring and there was a new area to learn, a new house to outfit, and doing so at a leisurely pace, but it kept us busy enough for a while.

But I suppose there may be a bit of the "type A" in me since after that, and helping a friend build an airplane (who said he probably wouldn't have finished it if I hadn't kept showing up every few days) well, frankly I just got bored. This works for now because I have my KMA hat, the commute is short and easy, the hours are reasonable, and there is no heavy lifting or extensive paperwork involved.

And for what they're paying me I should feel guilty but with therapy I'll get over it.
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Old 01-16-2011, 05:34 PM   #25
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"Decompression" was pretty well instaneous, probably because I had announced my retirement well in advance, and over the 6 months leading up to "the date", I was assigned no large projects, and completed or handed over all my remaining work, so I didn't have that immediate transition from really busy with lots of stress to retirement.

Between 2004 and 2008 we had lived in a town that we got to like a lot and knew that we wanted to move back there and also knew the activities we wanted to do on a day to day basis.

We had also planned 3 long trips for this first year and as soon as we had retired then the first year was already planned out.

Now starting on year 2....
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Old 01-16-2011, 05:47 PM   #26
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It took me no time at all. My former staff thought I'd go nuts and have at least a part-time job within six months. Five years later I still have the silly grin on my face.
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Old 01-16-2011, 06:04 PM   #27
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Decompression: 1-2 months
Normalization: 6 months into retirement, I am still adjusting to this new lifestyle.
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Old 01-16-2011, 06:10 PM   #28
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It has been 4 years or so, now I have a have a good start.
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Old 01-16-2011, 06:38 PM   #29
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I took the opposite approach: cleaned the slate right away, figuring I'd add things that I like one at a time when it felt right. So far, very few things make the cut. I remain embarrassed at how much I enjoy lazy-bumhood. This will pass.

Right?
Nope! Never, ever.
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Old 01-16-2011, 07:50 PM   #30
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Took me longer than most. That old "German work ethic" that's part of my inner being. It's been 3 years and I'm now mostly comfortable with retirement. I'll be even more comfortable when my husband of 36 years joins me in retirement in about a month.

I still think about work a lot, but suspect that will diminish when hubby joins me in "unemployment". We're working on fixing up our home to sell and moving back into our old place that's been a rental for the past 12 years.

Once DH is retired and we're down to one place, I think I'll let go of my former work life once and for all. I hope so anyway. If not, I'll look to Nords to shake me out of it. Hey, let's go surfing
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Old 01-16-2011, 08:08 PM   #31
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For the first couple months or so after retirement, I was waking up at the same time as always (too early), and feeling the need to be "productive" around the house. It was the middle of winter, so I occupied my time with various house projects (that had been put off for years), which was good for me (and the house). Once spring came, though, things changed, as I have a lot of hobbies/interests that I've never had enough time to spend on in the past. I got busy with all of those, and the time just flew by after that. Since that time, I've been more relaxed, I sleep better, and I rarely think about work any more. On the financial side of things, it took a few months for my pension check to get squared away and start arriving monthly, so of course when that occurred it helped ease whatever remaining anxiety I still had. So, basically it took me 3-4 months or so to get rid of the last vestiges of the old work life and transition into the new retirement life. After one year, I'm in a completely different state of mind than I was while working, and I can't imagine going back to that old life.
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Old 01-17-2011, 12:12 AM   #32
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I am developing a cuple of new hobbies and have begun writing, the "work" I prefer.
Honestly, I'm probably a bad example. I have two kids at home. It's not exactly what you usually think of as retirement. There are schedules, meetings, etc. DW and I can't just drop and go. In a year or so, they should be old enough to leave over night. In 5 1/2, they will be out (or they better be).
Having to be "on call" but not "on hand" is how I got started with the writing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich_in_Tampa View Post
I took the opposite approach: cleaned the slate right away, figuring I'd add things that I like one at a time when it felt right. So far, very few things make the cut. I remain embarrassed at how much I enjoy lazy-bumhood. This will pass.
Right?
My first post here was "This much fun can't be so easy, can it? What am I missing?!?"

Not much has changed since then...
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Old 01-17-2011, 02:40 PM   #33
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If I were *normal* I would have said 6 months to decompress and re-focus, but alas, I didn't get a normal FIRE. It turns out (in hindsight), that 2 weeks into my FIRE, my husband began an affair. What was supposed to be the most partylicious summer of my life became one filled with a deep sense of rejection and pain. He had me believing I was just paranoid or traumatized by retiring or having some type of midlife crisis (a emotional crime far worse than cheating, fyi).

Now 7 months later, I am still recovering from that emotional hurricane. Not every FIRE goes down as planned. Fortunately, I have always fended for myself financially, so despite the uncertainty of my life, FIRE is still a beautiful thing! Count your blessings, and always plan for Plan B.
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Old 01-17-2011, 04:04 PM   #34
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If I were *normal* I would have said 6 months to decompress and re-focus, but alas, I didn't get a normal FIRE. It turns out (in hindsight), that 2 weeks into my FIRE, my husband began an affair. What was supposed to be the most partylicious summer of my life became one filled with a deep sense of rejection and pain. He had me believing I was just paranoid or traumatized by retiring or having some type of midlife crisis (a emotional crime far worse than cheating, fyi).

Now 7 months later, I am still recovering from that emotional hurricane. Not every FIRE goes down as planned. Fortunately, I have always fended for myself financially, so despite the uncertainty of my life, FIRE is still a beautiful thing! Count your blessings, and always plan for Plan B.
Wow. I admire your strength and positive outlook. Good for you for fending for yourself financially and otherwise. IMHO, this summer should be the partylicious time of your life! Go for it queeneev
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Old 01-21-2011, 09:31 AM   #35
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Not sure what you mean by " decompress". There are probably several levels of this. Getting more sleep may be the first level. It probably depends upon how emotionally engaged you were at work before retiring. I still dream about work and it's been 4 1/2 years. I think it took me several years to redefine who I was after I retired. During this time I was irritable and not as much fun to be around. Things seem to be better now, or so I've been told. No question that I love retirement but for me it was an adjustment.
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Old 01-21-2011, 03:39 PM   #36
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It took me a year or so to decompress, although I did it while still on the j*b. My last two years were just 9-5, low stress w*rk, compared to the previous 25 years of high stress, on call, never sleeping through the night BS. It took me well over a year to learn to sleep through the night. Once I walked away from the j*b, though, I was done with it. Mostly.

As far as normalize, I don't do anything ending in "ize". As JonnyM said, that's w*rk talk.

Edit: DW saw me post this, and pointed out that I have to apolog "ize" to her fairly often.
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Old 01-21-2011, 04:35 PM   #37
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My career was a bit like a relationship (a calling, not just a job) and retiring from it was like getting out of said relationship. Getting out was something I started thinking about before I retired, so most of the "decompression" in the sense of disassociating "the meaning of my life" from "working at my career" happened prior to quitting. After I retired, I did not think much about my x-work at all.
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Old 01-21-2011, 04:55 PM   #38
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It's been almost 4 years, and I think I am STILL decompressing.

Just kidding...I would guess it was almost a year before I lost that feeling of "I'm supposed to be somewhere doing something". Other forum members may disagree with the 1 year guess-timate.
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Old 01-22-2011, 11:26 PM   #39
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Funny, my DW just found my two boxes from my ex-office. She was excited. She found a bottle of hand lotion and she was almost out. I have mixed feelings about going through them. I wonder how much of that stuff I considered important enough to take home then I would find important now? It's all personal stuff or work stuff that has personal interest like the videos of my news interviews and such.

Now I'm feeling like I need to go through them to kind of put that chapter to rest.
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Old 01-23-2011, 12:29 AM   #40
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Funny, my DW just found my two boxes from my ex-office. She was excited. She found a bottle of hand lotion and she was almost out. I have mixed feelings about going through them. I wonder how much of that stuff I considered important enough to take home then I would find important now? It's all personal stuff or work stuff that has personal interest like the videos of my news interviews and such.

Now I'm feeling like I need to go through them to kind of put that chapter to rest.
It looks like you've been able to successfully delegate that to your spouse...

I have a box like that in our closet under the steps. There's no reason to keep certificates & awards and other historical documents, but there's no compelling reason to get rid of them either.

I have a bunch of paperwork like that for my father and grandparents, too, that will probably hang around our closet for another four or five decades until some Ohana Nords genealogy enthusiast is willing to take them off my hands.

Other paperwork-- like my command's receipts for turning in all classified material and govt property-- I think I'll keep until the statute of limitations expires.

I never got around to getting rid of my gold dolphin insignia and my old submarine coveralls, either, but now maybe I should save them for my daughter!
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