Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-29-2011, 11:00 PM   #21
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
SteveR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,803
Not much to add except I agree that you should consider total demolition of any foundations, structures, piping and ground based systems like septic, water lines and sewer if present. With stuff as old as the 1930's you can be sure it is a mess and can create more issues if you leave it in place. Consider these expenses in your house building costs.

As for building a house...the main thing is a good plan with a reputable builder. I have built a couple of houses and designed one from the ground up. It is a great way to get what you want where you want it in a house. Spec houses tend to be too vanilla unless your builder can make modifications to the plan; the smaller the better to avoid extra architectural costs.

Talking with neighbors can be very helpful. Small town folks seem more willing to talk about things that big city people most of the time. Don't be afraid to knock on doors. Once they know what you are looking for they may surprise you with information.

Good luck with your decision.
__________________

__________________
Work? I don't have time to work....I'm retired.
SteveR is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 09-30-2011, 12:42 AM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
kyounge1956's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by chinaco View Post
Small town can make a difference.

Sometimes I just scan posts quickly and get the wrong idea... I was imagining a larger city.

What you described.... the area it brought to mind... where I live... You would probably be feeling like you might need a gun for protection.
"Large city lot" is kind of an ambiguous phrase, isn't it? In this case it is the lot that is large (10000 square feet) not the city. Aberdeen, Hoquiam and Cosmopolis, three cities close to each other, are the main population cluster of the county, with about 26 or 27 thousand people between them. There's one other town with just over 5000 people, and the rest are even smaller than that. It's (just barely) inside the city limits.
__________________

__________________
kyounge1956 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2011, 01:38 AM   #23
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
haha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Hooverville
Posts: 22,387
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyounge1956 View Post
"Large city lot" is kind of an ambiguous phrase, isn't it? In this case it is the lot that is large (10000 square feet) not the city. Aberdeen, Hoquiam and Cosmopolis, three cities close to each other, are the main population cluster of the county, with about 26 or 27 thousand people between them. There's one other town with just over 5000 people, and the rest are even smaller than that. It's (just barely) inside the city limits.
Are you certain that it will be cheaper to live here than in Seattle? Not to mention will it be even remotely comparable in quality of life?

People who have lived and worked in a big city often move out to a smaller place to retire, but find themselves on the road all too often, trying to get goods and services and experiences that they became accustomed to while living in the city. And then there is medical care. UW Health Sciences, Swedish, Virginia Mason, and Harbor View vs. Cosmopolis General?

Ha
__________________
"As a general rule, the more dangerous or inappropriate a conversation, the more interesting it is."-Scott Adams
haha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2011, 10:51 AM   #24
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
kyounge1956's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by haha View Post
Are you certain that it will be cheaper to live here than in Seattle?
I am reasonably certain that it will. City-data shows the January cost of living index in Aberdeen as 85.2 while Seattle is 117.1 (U.S. average is 100). All my budget calculations are based on my expenses while living in Seattle, so unless it most unexpectedly turns out to be significantly more expensive to live in Aberdeen, I don't foresee any problems there.

Quote:
Not to mention will it be even remotely comparable in quality of life?
That depends on what factors go to make up your personal definition of "quality of life". I have always lived in the city, but the type of activities I enjoy—reading, gardening, crafts, and noodling around on my computer—aren't really dependent on big-city resources. Most basic necessities—church, groceries, bank, library, veterinarian and shopping—are available within five miles of the property, and the bus line into town runs right past it. It may also be bike-able. It's not completely flat, but there's not a long steep hill between there and the middle of town.

Quote:
People who have lived and worked in a big city often move out to a smaller place to retire, but find themselves on the road all too often, trying to get goods and services and experiences that they became accustomed to while living in the city.
It is true that I have never lived in a small town in my life. Maybe I won't like it. I am thinking about taking a leave of absence from my job for 6 months or a year, renting a place down there, and trying it on for size. I guess if I just hate it, I will have to go back to work and get my house in Seattle paid off before I can retire. If I threw all the money I'm currently putting into my retirement account at my mortgage instead, that would take maybe three years or so, so I think I'd be done before the rate starts adjusting on my mortgage. If I do like small-town life, I can come back from leave, clean out my desk, and retire right away.

Quote:
And then there is medical care. UW Health Sciences, Swedish, Virginia Mason, and Harbor View vs. Cosmopolis General?

Ha
Medical care is a possible fly in the ointment. I am a Group Health member, and the nearest Group Health clinic is in Olympia, which is 40 miles or so away from the property. There are doctors on the Group Health network in other towns, but none right in Aberdeen. I need to call them up and find out exactly where I can get regular screening tests and more about seeing specialists. The main thing is, getting to the doctor is going to be less convenient than it is now unless I stay right in town, and if I stay in town, I can't afford to retire. I have a family history of glaucoma, so I am monitored for that, but having to drive to Seattle once a year to see my ophthalmologist does not strike me as an undue hardship. Having to make that trip many times a year would be a hassle. If I get some sort of chronic condition that requires frequent doctor visits, I will just have to move back, but I will cross that bridge if and when I get to it. I am not going to make convenience of treatment for some disease I don't have yet and may never get the overriding factor in choosing my retirement locale.
__________________
kyounge1956 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2011, 12:51 AM   #25
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,620
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyounge1956 View Post
Is it an umbrella liability policy I need? I take it you mean a policy that would pay a claim if there is damage to another property resulting from e.g. the garage catching fire or one of the big trees on the property blowing down in a windstorm. I called my homeowners' insurance today and when I described it, they said the only way they would cover the property is if the old garage was torn down. The exact words were they wouldn't cover the property unless there was "nothing on it, not even a pipe". If I do buy it, I won't have any additional money right away to pay for demolition of the garage and clearing away the other remnants like the old front steps and so on, so I guess I will have to use some other kind of insurance.
The insurance company is telling you that the owner of that lot is operating what the industry calls an "attractive nuisance". They don't want litigious people squatting on the property, attracted to its shelter & privacy potential, possibly engaging in hazardous activities, and feeling that they've been injured by the rich property owner's lack of due care for their well-being.

Even if a kid was seriously injured on the garage due to their own darn fault, the family's insurance company would sue your insurance company to recover the cost of the liability.

There's a reason that this "opportunity" has been publicly languishing for such a long time. That reason may only be fractionally due to housing prices and the Great Recession.
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2011, 02:02 AM   #26
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
kyounge1956's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nords View Post
T(snip)There's a reason that this "opportunity" has been publicly languishing for such a long time. That reason may only be fractionally due to housing prices and the Great Recession.
I don't know where you got the idea the property has been on the market for a long time. The trustee's sale was the end of July, and the bank took possession at the end of August. I first saw the listing two weeks ago. But it looks like it's a moot point anyway. I was just looking on the Assessor's website to see when the bank got title, and there's a new record of sale dated last Thursday. So it "languished" for all of about five weeks.

Oh well, at least now I have a sample that I can give to an agent for an idea of what I'm interested in.
__________________
kyounge1956 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2011, 10:39 AM   #27
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,620
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyounge1956 View Post
I don't know where you got the idea the property has been on the market for a long time.
I probably formed my mistaken impression here:
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyounge1956 View Post
Then the house sat empty and eventually got really rundown. That's why it was torn down.
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2011, 02:58 PM   #28
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
kyounge1956's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nords View Post
I probably formed my mistaken impression here:
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyounge1956
Then the house sat empty and eventually got really rundown. That's why it was torn down.
I see how what I wrote could be understood that way, but AFAIK, all that happened before the property went on the market. I think that the couple who lived there were renting it; when the wife died and the husband moved out, the owner of the house (an elderly widow) didn't find a new tenant. I think it said in the her late husband's obit that he had been a builder—maybe he was the one who managed and kept up their rental(s). If I had to, I'd guess the house needed work and the owner had neither the ability to do it herself, nor the money to pay someone else to do it; without a tenant, there'd be no money coming in to pay the mortgage, let alone renovate, so the house sat empty.

I spent yesterday afternoon with my parents. They are revising their wills. Looking at this property and thinking about wills is so sad. If that husband had appointed someone to manage their property, maybe his widow would still have rental income coming in, instead of losing the properties to foreclosure. At least she would have gotten something from selling the property. If what I saw on the assessor's website is the final price, this lot sold for less than the bank was asking, not even enough to pay the remaining balance on the loan. She won't get a penny from it.
__________________
kyounge1956 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2011, 10:56 AM   #29
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
kyounge1956's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,171
Once again I need to draw on the collective wisdom of E-R. I'm now looking at one of the properties on the tax foreclosure list in Grays Harbor County WA. The property is in Aberdeen, about 1/4 acre with an existing house on it that is much larger than I am interested in owning. I'm trying to decide whether I want to bid on it, with the intention, if I am the high bidder, of dividing it into two parcels and selling the one with the existing house on it.

So far, the things I've thought of to ask are:
  • Is the property big enough to divide (at least twice the minimum square footage for the zoning)?
  • If divided, would utilities be available to the new lot? What would be required for utility access either to existing water and sewer, possibly natural gas, in the street in front of the property? Are there utilities in the paved alley at the rear of the property?
  • If subdivided, how salable would the house be on a smaller lot than it has now?
  • What are the fees and application process for subdividing a property?
  • The local newspaper had an announcement of death of someone with the same name as the owner of the property shown in the assessor's records. Is the house at current going through probate? If so, do the heirs have any right of redemption after the foreclosure auction?
What other potential problems do I need to find out about?

I already know it's unlikely I will be the high bidder (the property is worth quite a lot more than I have available to bid), so no need to point that out.
What I'm trying to figure out at this point is whether or not I should even try to buy it. What questions do I need to ask to find out whether my plan of subdividing is a workable one? If it isn't I'll skip the auction altogether.
__________________
kyounge1956 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2011, 12:00 PM   #30
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 731
I thought of one thing to add (that I didn't see mentioned). Many times when you rebuild, you can't rebuild in the same place exactly - you need to follow current codes and be farther from the curb or the side property lines, that sort of thing.

We tore down a garage and had to place the new one several feet further from the property line. It cost a lot more and we had to file plans, etc. This was 30+ years ago so I don't remember the details except it can happen.

I think the advice already given is excellent.
__________________
Retired July 2, 2010 at 62. My only regret is that I couldn't do it sooner.
thinker25 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2011, 12:23 PM   #31
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
haha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Hooverville
Posts: 22,387
Whatever you do, it will be a more complicated path than is absolutely necessary.


But enjoy the process!

Ha
__________________
"As a general rule, the more dangerous or inappropriate a conversation, the more interesting it is."-Scott Adams
haha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2011, 01:31 PM   #32
Moderator
Ronstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: A little ways southwest of Chicago
Posts: 9,369
You need to talk to the governing authority that reviews and approves subdivisions in the area. Ask them your questions relating to the process, minimum lot standards, etc, and more importantly - would they grant approval for such a subdivision. These issues generally go to a public hearing where neighbors can voice their opinions on the proposal.

In addition, you'll have to do some due diligence on your own. Are there easements, flood plain, or other encumbrances that would prevent someone from building on the newly created lot? I would recommend hiring a surveyor or engineer to handle these issues.
__________________
Ronstar is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2011, 12:35 AM   #33
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
kyounge1956's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by thinker25 View Post
I thought of one thing to add (that I didn't see mentioned). Many times when you rebuild, you can't rebuild in the same place exactly - you need to follow current codes and be farther from the curb or the side property lines, that sort of thing.

We tore down a garage and had to place the new one several feet further from the property line. It cost a lot more and we had to file plans, etc. This was 30+ years ago so I don't remember the details except it can happen.

I think the advice already given is excellent.
If I had gotten the property I was looking at when I started this thread, setbacks would definitely have come into the picture. The old garage is, I think, right on the property line.

I have added "check setbacks" to my list of questions to ask about this one.
__________________
kyounge1956 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2011, 01:05 AM   #34
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
kyounge1956's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronstar View Post
You need to talk to the governing authority that reviews and approves subdivisions in the area. Ask them your questions relating to the process, minimum lot standards, etc, and more importantly - would they grant approval for such a subdivision. These issues generally go to a public hearing where neighbors can voice their opinions on the proposal.
I'm sure I wouldn't be able to get a definite yes or no answer about approval of the subdivision without actually submitting an application and jumping through all the hoops. I think if a public hearing is required, I'm out. I don't like the idea that I could meet all requirements of the land use code etc and still have some cantankerous neighbor derail my plans. I'm trying to remember whether I got any notice like that when the property down the street from here was subdivided. I don't think so, but I didn't have any objection, so maybe there was a hearing but I didn't go.

Quote:
In addition, you'll have to do some due diligence on your own.
That's what this thread is for. I've never tried to buy a property at at the tax foreclosure auction, nor subdivided one, so I don't know what due diligence consists of.
Quote:
Are there easements, flood plain, or other encumbrances that would prevent someone from building on the newly created lot? I would recommend hiring a surveyor or engineer to handle these issues.
I checked the property on floodsmart.gov, which says it is in an area of low-to-moderate flood risk. I also looked at the flood insurance rate map, which shows this as outside the floodplain, but the map is currently being updated and the new one won't be out for a year yet. Floodplain is the one of the first things I check when researching a property, because Hoquiam and Aberdeen are on the banks of the Chehalis River, and a significant fraction of the developed area of both cities is subject to flooding. I'm not sure how to check for easements. Maybe the county Recorder's office would have that info.
__________________
kyounge1956 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2011, 01:22 AM   #35
Full time employment: Posting here.
toofrugalformycat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Anchorage
Posts: 731
Sorry if I missed this in my quick scan of this thread, but beware of underground oil or gasoline storage tanks. Our older house had a boiler that had been converted from oil to natural gas, but the oil pipe was still there coming through the foundation. We eventually had the tank dug up and removed (with much difficulty) and it still had 800 gallons of fuel oil in it. The tank was almost rusted through. I mean it was a really close thing. If your fuel tank leaks and spoils an aquifer.... it's best that it not happen. I'm sure the likelihood of this (and your legal liability) varies greatly depending on location.
__________________
toofrugalformycat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2011, 01:41 AM   #36
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
kyounge1956's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by toofrugalformycat View Post
Sorry if I missed this in my quick scan of this thread, but beware of underground oil or gasoline storage tanks. Our older house had a boiler that had been converted from oil to natural gas, but the oil pipe was still there coming through the foundation. We eventually had the tank dug up and removed (with much difficulty) and it still had 800 gallons of fuel oil in it. The tank was almost rusted through. I mean it was a really close thing. If your fuel tank leaks and spoils an aquifer.... it's best that it not happen. I'm sure the likelihood of this (and your legal liability) varies greatly depending on location.
Thanks for that reminder! My previous house had an old oil tank in the back yard even though the furnace had been converted to natural gas back in the 1960's. I had the tank filled with foam before I sold the house in 1996. I wonder how I find out whether this house has an oil tank. It's certainly old enough...built in 1926. Maybe I can find out from the gas company when the main was put in. Who knows, maybe it still has oil heat. If it was there before the gas main, maybe it hasn't been changed over.
__________________
kyounge1956 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2011, 08:46 AM   #37
Moderator
Ronstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: A little ways southwest of Chicago
Posts: 9,369
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyounge1956 View Post
I'm sure I wouldn't be able to get a definite yes or no answer about approval of the subdivision without actually submitting an application and jumping through all the hoops.
True, but city/county staff will give you their gut feeling whether they think it will pass the board/council/plan commission or not. Real estate developers generally go over their proposals with staff early on, and will scrap or go on the proposal based on staff's recommendations.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kyounge1956 View Post
I'm not sure how to check for easements. Maybe the county Recorder's office would have that info.
Maybe. Some counties have tract books that list all transactions by property description, making it easy to track down everything about a property. Others have grantor-grantee indexes that track by owner. Not as easy, because you have to know the owners through the course of time, and then research the owners to see if they granted easements. I would think someone at the county would help you get started. A title commitment would list easements, etc - but its tough getting one from a seller prior to closing.

Another thing to research is zoning. Find out the current zoning class of the property. There will be minimum lot sizes, frontages, building setbacks, etc listed in the zoning ordinance for each zoning class. Then determine if you can fit a decent sized house on your proposed new vacant lot given these standards. You also want to make sure that the new lot for the current house meets the standards. If you can't meet these standards, then you would have to petition to rezone the property to a zoning class that has lot area, frontage, setbacks, etc that would work.

And if you find out a public hearing is needed, then maybe you should contact the neighbors up front to see if they have any objections before you proceed.

Good luck!
__________________
Ronstar is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2011, 03:31 AM   #38
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
kyounge1956's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronstar View Post
True, but city/county staff will give you their gut feeling whether they think it will pass the board/council/plan commission or not. Real estate developers generally go over their proposals with staff early on, and will scrap or go on the proposal based on staff's recommendations.
I went on my fact-finding trip today. I didn't come right out and ask the staff at the building department, but they didn't throw up any obvious barriers. The property is definitely large enough to divide, it isn't in a floodplain or any other environmentally critical area, and there is a water main and a sewer in the paved alley at the back of the property, so the new lot could get utilities from back there. But it could be expensive—the sewer in back is shallow and the property slopes down away from the alley. A house that meets the minimum setback requirement might be lower than the sewer and require a pump. Alternatively, it might be possible to get gravity flow out to the sewer in the street in front, but it would be a very long side sewer—the lot is about 180 feet from back to front—and it would require work in a busy roadway with the sewer line on the far side of the street, so that would be expensive too.

Quote:
Maybe. Some counties have tract books that list all transactions by property description, making it easy to track down everything about a property. Others have grantor-grantee indexes that track by owner. Not as easy, because you have to know the owners through the course of time, and then research the owners to see if they granted easements. I would think someone at the county would help you get started. A title commitment would list easements, etc - but its tough getting one from a seller prior to closing.
I didn't have time to make an in-depth search. I asked at the recorder's office and there was nothing in their computerized records, which go back to 1981. The house was built in 1926, so there could easily be something from before that date.

Quote:
Another thing to research is zoning. Find out the current zoning class of the property. There will be minimum lot sizes, frontages, building setbacks, etc listed in the zoning ordinance for each zoning class. Then determine if you can fit a decent sized house on your proposed new vacant lot given these standards. You also want to make sure that the new lot for the current house meets the standards. If you can't meet these standards, then you would have to petition to rezone the property to a zoning class that has lot area, frontage, setbacks, etc that would work.

And if you find out a public hearing is needed, then maybe you should contact the neighbors up front to see if they have any objections before you proceed.

Good luck!
The property is zoned multiple residential. It looks probable that all setback requirements could be met for the existing house, but it would end up with a very small back yard, and I'm sure be less salable than it is with its current big yards on both sides. I didn't have time to ask a real-estate agent about that, whether it would make the existing house more or less impossible to sell. I think it's rented now, but I have no desire to be a landlady even though if I'm the successful bidder I will have gotten the house so cheaply I could pay a management company to deal with everything, and still make money. I always resented being a tenant, and I feel uncomfortable about making money by putting someone else in a position in which I felt taken-advantage-of.

As to the public input, I need to re-read the ordinance more carefully. Members of the public can appeal, but it doesn't sound like one cantankerous neighbor could veto the whole thing. I think they would have to convince the City Planner or someone that the proposed subdivision is a bad idea, or actually in violation of the code, or something like that.

But I am getting cold feet about the idea. It appears that the late owner owed a number of people money, and I got conflicting info about whether the owner's other creditors would still have a valid lien against the property after the tax auction. One office said yes, the other said no. I would have thought they would have to present their claims to his executor, but anyway it sounds possible that by buying the house I might be buying some of the late owner's debts.

The recorder told me about a website where you can look up court cases all over the state by name, and it looks like his estate is in probate right here in King County. The heirs may have right of redemption even after the auction, if they can show they didn't get the notices warning them of the foreclosure or there was some other fault. The same owner has property in the tax foreclosure list in another county, and when I looked online for info earlier in my researches I found what looked like a bank foreclosure against yet another property he owned. It may be that the heirs know about the foreclosure, but there's no money in the estate to pay the taxes.

It seems very possible this property will go into the auction. The person I talked to at the treasurer's office said last year there were about a hundred properties auctioned, of which 75 were actually sold—nobody bid on the others so now the county owns them. I will keep an eye on the website. Properties that are redeemed are taken off the web, so maybe the heirs will pay the taxes and take the decision out of my hands. I'm almost hoping they do because if this goes in the auction I'd be tempted to bid on it in spite of my doubts, and that might be a dumb thing to do.
__________________
kyounge1956 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2011, 05:23 AM   #39
Moderator
Ronstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: A little ways southwest of Chicago
Posts: 9,369
kyounge1956 - Sounds like you have the research pretty much done. And it doesn't look like subdividing/zoning is a huge problem. But I agree - the lien issue could be a problem. It's good that you are researching whether or not you would get clear title from a tax auction.
__________________
Ronstar is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2011, 07:57 PM   #40
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: aberdeen
Posts: 267
I will be retiring and moving next summer. Besides the obvious which has been described above, when I find a definite house I want to buy, I will go back and forth countless times, and talk to as many people and kids as I can to gather the feel of the neighborhood. Certainly you have to talk with your potential neighbors, and if they happen to be undesirable, there is no way you are going to be happy there.
I agree, it is "amazing" how strangers are so open to talk with you, so long as you present yourself as a decent person, friendly and willing to communicate. Even in "snob hill" it can be surprising how people can be so helpful and open to questions.
__________________

__________________
Birchwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
"Gray divorce" in retirement Nords Life after FIRE 46 07-27-2011 09:48 PM
Middle-Income Boomers Expect Tough Retirement mickeyd FIRE and Money 27 07-27-2011 08:44 AM
GAO Report on Retirement Income Purron FIRE and Money 5 07-17-2011 03:27 PM
Mid 40's looking for soft retirement in 8yrs, 9 months and 23 days sspribyl Hi, I am... 0 07-17-2011 01:34 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:41 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.