Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
stress health retirement
Old 09-26-2007, 10:19 PM   #1
Moderator Emeritus
Khan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Pine Island, Florida
Posts: 6,868
Send a message via AIM to Khan
stress health retirement

I retired a/o 31 Dec '04.

My physical/mental health has continually improved since then.

Lost 75# of fat
Gained strength through exercising.
Migraines/tooth grinding/arthritis pain/bad dreams... tapered off.

Today I went to the dentist for 6 month cleaning/check up.

It was first 6 month interval after years of four month intervals with lots of digging and scraping involved. Only 20 minutes this time.

The hygienist remarked at how little buildup there was, and called over the others to comment on it. The dentist remarked how much my gums had improved.

I asked him if stress reduction could explain the improvement in oral health, and he said stress is involved with all sorts of negative health factors.

Sometimes I feel a little upset that I did not enable myself to retire earlier.

How has your health improved?
__________________

__________________
"Knowin' no one nowhere's gonna miss us when we're gone..."
Khan is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 09-26-2007, 11:14 PM   #2
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
73ss454's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: LaLa Land
Posts: 4,378
I'm only retired for months not years and the first thing I noticed is how much better I feel on Sundays. I'd have stomach pains and feel depressed the whole day. Now DW has to tell me when it's Sunday.
__________________

__________________
73ss454 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 07:23 AM   #3
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,928
Quote:
Originally Posted by 73ss454 View Post
I'm only retired for months not years and the first thing I noticed is how much better I feel on Sundays. I'd have stomach pains and feel depressed the whole day. Now DW has to tell me when it's Sunday.
I know what you mean (I'm still working). I don't have stomach pains, but Sundays are almost a work day, in a sense. By Sunday afternoon, I am thinking about whether the laundry is done and groceries are in for the week, and wanting to spend the late afternoon and evening doing nothing so that I can manage to fall sleep early.
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 08:00 AM   #4
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
travelover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 9,899
Since I retired this March I've lost weight and gained strength (really noticed it backpacking recently). Emotionally - I'm happier than I have been in years. I find myself whistling and sliding on the hardwood floors in my socks - like a kid . I never have those awful tension related neck and upper back aches that I used to have frequently. And yes - Sundays are now just another day.
__________________
Yes, I have achieved work / life balance.
travelover is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 08:39 AM   #5
Moderator Emeritus
Rich_by_the_Bay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 8,827
Stress and illness such as cardiac rhythm problems and sudden death are associated with preceding psychosocial stress. These are very difficult studies to do, but there are some clever tricks (for example, reading heart rhythm in patients who have standby implanted pacemakers and associating the findings with various stressors). The two strongest traits are anger/hostility and anxiety disorders (especially with various phobias). These are probably related to excess levels of adrenalin-like chemicals in the body, produced by the adrenals in response to brain signals (hypothalamus) induced by stress.

The old "Type A Personality" theory is probably explained by these more specific traits.

It's hard to imagine any aspect of voluntary, secure, retirement that wouldn't reduce overall stress. However, if the timing or quality of FIRE induces financial insecurity, domestic strife, or other stress generators it might be no better than working. Leaving the horrible job may be worse than embarking on retirement where you worry about money every month, can't get health insurance, have a poor self-image, and are constantly fighting with the DW/DH.

At some primal biochemical level, the decision of when to FIRE could be defined as that point where the anticipated stress of retirement (all things considered) becomes less than that of continued work.

You can't fool your hypothalamus.
__________________
Rich
San Francisco Area
ESR'd March 2010. FIRE'd January 2011.

As if you didn't know..If the above message contains medical content, it's NOT intended as advice, and may not be accurate, applicable or sufficient. Don't rely on it for any purpose. Consult your own doctor for all medical advice.
Rich_by_the_Bay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 09:07 AM   #6
Moderator Emeritus
Martha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: minnesota
Posts: 13,212
Nice post Rich.
__________________
.


No more lawyer stuff, no more political stuff, so no more CYA

Martha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 10:28 AM   #7
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
happy2bretired's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 1,340
Since I lost my husband two months before I retired I think my stress level and illnesses during my first year and a half of retirement were related to the loss of my husband...not retirement. I believe that what Rich said is extremely true. Right now, I feel that I am in a good place stresswise...things are beginning to calm down for me and retirement is good. My health over the last year and a half has awoken a desire or a need to improve my health in retirement. My stress level is really pretty good right now.
__________________
happy2bretired is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 12:52 PM   #8
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,015
When I was working I had two episodes that each put me in the hospital overnight. Both times I thought I was having a heart attack after experiencing very high levels of stress at work. It turned out that both episodes were stress induced panic attacks -- and each had symptoms that closely resembled heart problems. Fortunately, I was not having cardiac problems, but the doctors counseled me that if I didn't address the stress in a major way, my next visit would likely be either a M.I. or a stroke.

I know people who say they operate better under stress. Well, maybe at some level, but when you can't breathe, you have pain in your jaw, and you can't remember the names of your family members, you've crossed the line. I know I did and I wouldn't want to go there again.

Once I retired and started taking better care of my physical and mental health, my stress level has declined probably 90%. I find myself in such a pleasant state of mind most days, very much at peace with myself and truly enjoying everything -- even routine chores like the laundry! I truly can say that now life is good.
__________________
Achiever51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 12:57 PM   #9
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,619
http://www.early-retirement.org/foru...ife-15201.html

http://www.early-retirement.org/foru...tml#post465633
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 03:39 PM   #10
Full time employment: Posting here.
tangomonster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 756
Even while working, I had low blood pressure and cholesterol, etc.---just the luck of the draw with genetics. But I felt awful---uptight, agitated, nervous. No more!

DH had more issues with medical stuff and now feels much better. In fact, he went to the dentist last week and they felt his gums had improved. I never even tied it to a year of retirement, but you may be on to something, Khan!
__________________
“It is not a sign of good health to be well adjusted to a sick society”.------Krishnamurti
tangomonster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 04:25 PM   #11
Moderator Emeritus
CuppaJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: At The Cafe
Posts: 6,866
I've changed j*bs many times over the years and tended to gravitate toward kinds of job that have less of that awful stress. Even so, I ended up in the ER one evening with a 90% blocked LAD artery, after spending the afternoon cleaning up everything in the office that needed to be done and asking myself repeatedly, "is this a good time to check into the hospital [considering business reasons!]." Much of my current j*b stress is hidden by a big wall I put up between myself and clients' problems.

I have absolutely no doubt the big R will improve my health many fold.
__________________
CuppaJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 05:42 PM   #12
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,928
I am so stressed out by my job today that I can feel my BP rise, and it is usually normal! I am exhausted and tired and miserable, and if I didn't have my eyes on the light at the end of the tunnel, life would be unbearable. Well, today anyway.

Just thought I'd refresh the memories of those who have already ER'd, in case they are wondering if they left too early.

If I can stick it out for two more years, I will get lifetime free medical. Otherwise I would quit today.
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 05:59 PM   #13
Moderator Emeritus
CuppaJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: At The Cafe
Posts: 6,866
Quote:
Originally Posted by Want2retire View Post

I am so stressed out by my job today that I can feel my BP rise, and it is usually normal! I am exhausted and tired and miserable, and if I didn't have my eyes on the light at the end of the tunnel, life would be unbearable. Well, today anyway.
Sometimes, I read the posts here and what to scream at other people's pain or just put myself "out to lunch," I can relate to so much of it.

I'd be interested in knowing what people do to try and make their jobs more pleasant, while waiting. (There goes Godet again, all ye theater buffs.)

I don't have any an advice, Want2Retire, but hope that most of your days are better than this one.
__________________
CuppaJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 06:17 PM   #14
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 927
Quote:
If I can stick it out for two more years, I will get lifetime free medical. Otherwise I would quit today.
Boy, this really hits a chord with me.

I've been thinking about this and so many other ironies surrounding work and retirement (and wondering why I didn't noticed them years ago).

1. I need health coverage in case I get sick, but the job I have to stay at to maintain coverage is MAKING me sick. (My back hurts from sitting all day, I have carpal tunnel from computing all day, I have 20 extra pounds from stress eating and multi-tasking lunch and work, etc. etc.)

2. I need to work for dental coverage, but the job I have to stay at to maintain dental coverage causes me to grind my teeth and I've had to get crowns as a result.

3. I need to work to make money to travel, but I only have 4 weeks a year in which to get away. (Worse, I modified my vacation this year, and skipped international travel last year because the planning it would take seemed too stressful.)

4. I need to work to afford my mortgage, but I don't enjoy my house because I'm always AT work or exhausted AFTER work. (Worse, the lovely vintage house I bought is in need of repair because I'm too tired and unmotivated to spiff it up.)

5. (This one isn't mine, but others have it) -- I need to work to support my kids, but I work so much I never see them.

6. I need to work to afford retirement, but 3 colleagues working at these same stress levels dropped dead at work in the past few years and were carried out feet first.

7. I made twice as much as my partner last year, but the IRS / State took a larger chunk as a result.

I'm probably missing a lot more.

I'm not sharing all this to sound bitter, but they say you have to recognize a problem before you can solve it, and this work business is starting to look like a problem.
__________________
Caroline is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 06:31 PM   #15
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,928
Quote:
Originally Posted by CuppaJoe View Post
Sometimes, I read the posts here and what to scream at other people's pain or just put myself "out to lunch," I can relate to so much of it.

I'd be interested in knowing what people do to try and make their jobs more pleasant, while waiting. (There goes Godet again, all ye theater buffs.)

I don't have any an advice, Want2Retire, but hope that most of your days are better than this one.
Thanks, Joe. Me too!! I'm sure they will be. Only 772 more (counting weekends) until I qualify for that lifetime medical.

And Caroline, you are so right. Often our chains are self-imposed and not necessary.

With my luck, when I finally retire it will turn out that I didn't need lifetime medical (due to national health care, or some other change in our health care system).
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 06:46 PM   #16
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,619
Quote:
Originally Posted by Want2retire View Post
Just thought I'd refresh the memories of those who have already ER'd, in case they are wondering if they left too early.
Er, thanks anyway, but, uhm... no.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CuppaJoe View Post
I'd be interested in knowing what people do to try and make their jobs more pleasant, while waiting.
I was almost always able to take a break and walk around the buildings for a while to monitor the teaching, talk with people, fuss with the equipment, and sometimes even find inspiration/help on the problems I was working. At sea you'd get into a mood and feel that life sucked, but then equipment would break or someone would run a drill set and you'd find out just how bad life could really suck.

At the training command, being able to run the fire & flooding systems was just a bonus...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Caroline View Post
I need to work for dental coverage, but the job I have to stay at to maintain dental coverage causes me to grind my teeth and I've had to get crowns as a result.
My father slept with a mouthguard for years, ground through several of them, and I think he's finally free of them.
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 06:46 PM   #17
Moderator Emeritus
CuppaJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: At The Cafe
Posts: 6,866
Quote:
Originally Posted by Want2retire View Post

Only 772 more (counting weekends) until I qualify for that lifetime medical.
Thanks for the idea, Want2Retire, I am so far behind; I haven't set up the count yet. Here it is, I have just the right "tool" in my desk (a wheel showing how many days from one date to another) First available R date is 214 days! 'spose then I'll say the summer is so easy at work might as well go 332 days. Next plan will be to talk myself back to 214. I'll set that wheel up on my desk, perhaps on a fancy easel.
__________________
CuppaJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 07:11 PM   #18
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,928
Quote:
Originally Posted by CuppaJoe View Post
Thanks for the idea, Want2Retire, I am so far behind; I haven't set up the count yet. Here it is, I have just the right "tool" in my desk (a wheel showing how many days from one date to another) First available R date is 214 days! 'spose then I'll say the summer is so easy at work might as well go 332 days. Next plan will be to talk myself back to 214. I'll set that wheel up on my desk, perhaps on a fancy easel.
My plan has been to work for 1035 more days, so that I can contribute my $20K for 2010 to my TSP before I retire. But if the next 772 days are like today, I'll leave earlier than that! 772 is my first goal, and once I am there I can play it by ear.

I compute my days on a worksheet in my retirement Excel file, and then write it on my whiteboard. Each day I change the number. Nobody has asked what it is, yet.
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 07:23 PM   #19
Moderator
Alan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Eee Bah Gum
Posts: 21,132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Want2retire View Post
If I can stick it out for two more years, I will get lifetime free medical. Otherwise I would quit today.
That is exactly the with with me also. (29 months)

The ways I try and keep the stress down at work are the usual ones such as
- leaving the office at lunchtime (I used to walk at lunch until 3 years back when I moved to 3 miles away so now I go home).
- fixed time to exercise after work. Used to join DW at 5:30 every evening for exercising together at home, Now go to gymn/exercise class at YMCA straight from work
- get up and walk around the floor, building fairly regularly during the day.
- and something I've just done again this week and have done every vacation for the last 5 years ----> before going on vacation for a week or longer, set out of office reply to tell people you are on vacation and will not read old mail on return - so if it is really important to re-send it after you return - then on return delete all mail while you have been away. (I used to keep some large files that I would put in my fail file to put it over the size limit so that incoming mail would be returned by the company changed the mail policy)
__________________
Retired in Jan, 2010 at 55, moved to England in May 2016
Now it's adventure before dementia
Alan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2007, 07:30 PM   #20
Moderator
Alan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Eee Bah Gum
Posts: 21,132
As for lower stress in retirement leading to better health, I don't expect to see any as I am very healthy now. However I very occaisionally see my old boss who retired about 18 months back. He too didn't have any obvious health problems but says he feels much better. Last time I saw him I asked what he was using to dye his hair (he isn't the vain type who bothers about this sort of thing). He said that it is amazing but his gray hair is disappearing (he is 59). I've not heard that before. Gray hair is not my problem as I don't have any. I wonder if lower stress in retirement will help me grow some back
__________________

__________________
Retired in Jan, 2010 at 55, moved to England in May 2016
Now it's adventure before dementia
Alan is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Changes in Health, Post-retirement aggie Health and Early Retirement 15 05-09-2007 05:22 PM
Stress and OT Helen Other topics 10 02-21-2007 03:07 PM
health after retirement Khan Life after FIRE 21 09-20-2006 02:50 PM
Health Care in Retirement Sammy FIRE and Money 9 11-13-2005 09:18 PM
Early retirement and health concerns dwk FIRE and Money 15 05-03-2005 08:06 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:06 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.