Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-30-2017, 09:15 PM   #101
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Colorado Mountains
Posts: 3,073
I have thought about replacing my 2013 Jeep with a much older model. Then new vehicles have so much electronics in them and so much wire, which is very thin so they can pack more wires into the steering column, that at least the one I have is not very dependable on the rough dirt road I have to drive on to get back and forth to town. I should not be having the problems I am having on a car with less than 60,000 miles on it.
Hermit is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 04-30-2017, 09:23 PM   #102
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 23,635
Quote:
Originally Posted by meierlde View Post
Note there is a simple way to get clothes drier in washers which was suggested in the owners manual of my current top load washer, in particular towels and the like. Give the load an extra spin (the washer has a spin only cycle). This does extract some more water and uses very little energy once the washer is up to speed.
A few years ago, I actually did a relatively scientific analysis of this. Probably have a file on my computer somewhere, or maybe not as the results were not impressive, at least with my washer.

I took the load of clothes out after the normal washer/spin cycle, and weighed them on the digital kitchen scale. Then did another spin and another, weighing each time. And again when they were dried, so I knew how much water weight they retained after the first spin.

The numbers were measurable, but too small to justify even fussing with the playing with the dials, and coming back again after that spin cycle was over. I think maybe the extra spin removed a few percent extra water, the next spin an even smaller delta (as expected).

You might get different results on a different washer, but I imagine the designers already had a pretty good idea of where the point of diminishing returns were, and stopped the timer there.

But if you really want to know, that process should give you a pretty good idea. And yes, your spouse will be quite entertained by this

But if you do measure a difference, it should save some energy - you are correct that the spin cycle should take less energy than the drying.

-ERD50
ERD50 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2017, 09:35 PM   #103
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
NW-Bound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 30,008
Sorry for getting away from the OP's topic, but I have to make a comment here regarding cloth dryers.

Here in the SW, where the outside temperature in the summer is 110F+ (more than 43C), it would be great if I could draw the air up in the attic, which could be as high as 140F, into the air intake of the dryer. It is ridiculous to think of the energy that I pay to cool that air down to 78F with the AC, then heat it up again to expel it outdoor.

If the dryer could be located out in the garage, it would be great. It is in my utility room now, which is part of the air-conditioned living space.
__________________
"Those Who Can Make You Believe Absurdities Can Make You Commit Atrocities" - Voltaire (1694-1778)
NW-Bound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2017, 09:48 PM   #104
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 7,673
I have a spin dryer (in addition to a regular dryer) and it is way cool. It spins at a high speed, without heat, and most of the water comes out of clothes into a bowl after a few minutes. I put it on the Kill a Watt meter and the energy use was pretty low. If I put clothes at night in the spin dryer and then put them on the drying racks in the garage or kitchen the clothes will be dry by morning. Or if I use the electric dryer it cuts the drying time in the electric dryer way down, and that appliance is a big energy user.

I just bought an induction burner I use with my thermal cooker, so I can make meals without using much electricity. I heat up the inner pot on the induction burner and then put it in the outer pot and put the lid on. It was hot here today so I made soup that way and it doesn't add any heat to the house while the soup is cooking, and also the soup stays hot even if the electricity goes out.
__________________
Even clouds seem bright and breezy, 'Cause the livin' is free and easy, See the rat race in a new way, Like you're wakin' up to a new day (Dr. Tarr and Professor Fether lyrics, Alan Parsons Project, based on an EA Poe story)
daylatedollarshort is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2017, 10:42 PM   #105
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Kerrville,Tx
Posts: 3,327
Quote:
Originally Posted by NW-Bound View Post
Sorry for getting away from the OP's topic, but I have to make a comment here regarding cloth dryers.

Here in the SW, where the outside temperature in the summer is 110F+ (more than 43C), it would be great if I could draw the air up in the attic, which could be as high as 140F, into the air intake of the dryer. It is ridiculous to think of the energy that I pay to cool that air down to 78F with the AC, then heat it up again to expel it outdoor.

If the dryer could be located out in the garage, it would be great. It is in my utility room now, which is part of the air-conditioned living space.
It could be done if your dryer is on a outside wall. Just have to figure out how to hook the duct thru the wall, to the back of the dryer as suggested on this web site:Converting a Clothes Dryer to Use Solar Heated Attic Air For Drying

This assumes the dryer has a no heat cycle.
meierlde is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2017, 06:36 AM   #106
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: the prairies
Posts: 3,588
Quote:
Originally Posted by NW-Bound View Post
Here in the SW, where the outside temperature in the summer is 110F+ (more than 43C), it would be great if I could draw the air up in the attic, which could be as high as 140F, into the air intake of the dryer. It is ridiculous to think of the energy that I pay to cool that air down to 78F with the AC, then heat it up again to expel it outdoor.
Some people in cold climates want to do the opposite...recapture the heat exhaust from dryers during winter.
Music Lover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2017, 08:54 AM   #107
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Lsbcal's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: west coast, hi there!
Posts: 7,507
I have no idea if this is something many people do or not. I installed a clothes rack in our small washer/dryer room. Materials are just a wood dowel, end caps, and a few screws. Works great for some of those items you don't want any shrinkage on.

Lsbcal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2017, 09:31 AM   #108
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 23,635
Quote:
Originally Posted by meierlde View Post
Note there is a simple way to get clothes drier in washers which was suggested in the owners manual of my current top load washer, in particular towels and the like. Give the load an extra spin (the washer has a spin only cycle). This does extract some more water and uses very little energy once the washer is up to speed.
Thinking about this again, since your manufacturer actually offers this advice, you would think there would be a button for an "extra long spin cycle". That would be better than having to attend to it, and add a "spin only" cycle.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NW-Bound View Post
Sorry for getting away from the OP's topic, but I have to make a comment here regarding cloth dryers.

Here in the SW, where the outside temperature in the summer is 110F+ (more than 43C), it would be great if I could draw the air up in the attic, which could be as high as 140F, into the air intake of the dryer. It is ridiculous to think of the energy that I pay to cool that air down to 78F with the AC, then heat it up again to expel it outdoor.

If the dryer could be located out in the garage, it would be great. It is in my utility room now, which is part of the air-conditioned living space.
It's a little surprising that an outside air connection for a dryer isn't code in that area. Sure makes a lot of sense with hot, dry air available much/most of the year.

-ERD50
ERD50 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2017, 10:09 AM   #109
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Lsbcal's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: west coast, hi there!
Posts: 7,507
Quote:
Originally Posted by ERD50 View Post
Thinking about this again, since your manufacturer actually offers this advice, you would think there would be a button for an "extra long spin cycle". That would be better than having to attend to it, and add a "spin only" cycle.
...

-ERD50
Our Bosch washer allows slow, medium, and fast spin cycles.
Lsbcal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2017, 01:39 PM   #110
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 22,794
Quote:
Originally Posted by Music Lover View Post
Some people in cold climates want to do the opposite...recapture the heat exhaust from dryers during winter.
I tried that about 15 years ago and bought a screen thing that went in the dryer vent intending to use it in the winter to recapture the heat and moisture. The screen mesh was pretty fine, but still I got lots of dryer lint in the basement room with the dryer so I took it out. Great idea, but at least at the time it didn't work out well in practice.
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2017, 04:32 PM   #111
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 15,697
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt34 View Post
I tried that about 15 years ago and bought a screen thing that went in the dryer vent intending to use it in the winter to recapture the heat and moisture. The screen mesh was pretty fine, but still I got lots of dryer lint in the basement room with the dryer so I took it out. Great idea, but at least at the time it didn't work out well in practice.

That is a bit strange... maybe your dryers lint screen was bad or gone...

I have looked at the vent tube before since I have heard stories about fires etc.... ours was clean... no lint at all... I have also never seen any coming outside when in the driveway....
Texas Proud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2017, 05:07 PM   #112
Recycles dryer sheets
Beldar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lsbcal View Post
I have no idea if this is something many people do or not. I installed a clothes rack in our small washer/dryer room. Materials are just a wood dowel, end caps, and a few screws. Works great for some of those items you don't want any shrinkage on.
It's so dry here in the desert that nearly year round we just hang the laundry outside to dry. Takes no more than an hour or so and is FREE. The clothes dryer we have is only used when the local city bumpkins burn wood in the "winter". I'm thinking about some sort of extendable clothesline in the garage for those occasions.

Hmm, shrinkage, thats very Seinfeldian.
Beldar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2017, 05:28 PM   #113
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Kerrville,Tx
Posts: 3,327
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beldar View Post
It's so dry here in the desert that nearly year round we just hang the laundry outside to dry. Takes no more than an hour or so and is FREE. The clothes dryer we have is only used when the local city bumpkins burn wood in the "winter". I'm thinking about some sort of extendable clothesline in the garage for those occasions.

Hmm, shrinkage, thats very Seinfeldian.
Much simpler just put some hooks high on the garage walls, and string clotheslines between them depending on your height and the height of the ceiling additional hooks from the ceiling might also help. (My folks did this in their garage) The real question will be how many lines across the garage are needed)
meierlde is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2017, 06:09 PM   #114
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
RunningBum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 11,382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt34 View Post
I tried that about 15 years ago and bought a screen thing that went in the dryer vent intending to use it in the winter to recapture the heat and moisture. The screen mesh was pretty fine, but still I got lots of dryer lint in the basement room with the dryer so I took it out. Great idea, but at least at the time it didn't work out well in practice.
I did that this year with this: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000DZFTC6

You put a little water in the container the vent passes into, to catch the lint. Seemed to work pretty well. A bonus is that it's a moist heat, good for winter, though it's in my basement where I need the moisture the least. A month or so ago I switched back to outside venting.

I've also got a clothesline in my laundry room, but only for my running clothes, that supposedly lose their moisture wicking ability more if you put them in the heat of the dryer.
RunningBum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2017, 06:49 PM   #115
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Colorado Mountains
Posts: 3,073
I hooked a nylon hose to our dryer many years ago. The dryer was in the basement. It worked very well.
Hermit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2017, 07:49 PM   #116
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 75
Sometimes older is better. My 30 year old Porsche 911, which I drive almost daily, offers a fantastically fun, raw driving experience that modern 'appliance' cars wholly lack. I pity those who will never enjoy this transcendent experience!
steadystate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2017, 08:33 PM   #117
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Colorado Mountains
Posts: 3,073
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffInSeattle View Post
Sometimes older is better. My 30 year old Porsche 911, which I drive almost daily, offers a fantastically fun, raw driving experience that modern 'appliance' cars wholly lack. I pity those who will never enjoy this transcendent experience!
I think you would have to compare it to a new sports car. Who knows? You might like a new Porsche with one of those monster horse power engines and a little driving assistance to help you keep it on the road if you get in over your head.
Hermit is offline   Reply With Quote
Frugality vs. technology
Old 05-01-2017, 09:39 PM   #118
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
GravitySucks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Syracuse
Posts: 3,043
Frugality vs. technology

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lsbcal View Post
I also check the vent every year for buildup of lint as this is a fire hazard I've heard. I think a poorly vented system might also reduce dryer efficiency.


Dear BIL is an insurance adjuster for real estate damages. He told me lint build up is in the top ten residential fire claims.
I thought I needed to buy a new dryer but it was a clogged vent that's was causing the dryer to shut off some times. Cleaned it out and the time to dry is right back to 12 years ago. I'll have to remember to clean it again this summer.
__________________
No, not rich. I am a poor man with money, which is not the same thing"
GravitySucks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2017, 09:49 PM   #119
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
GravitySucks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Syracuse
Posts: 3,043
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt34 View Post
I tried that about 15 years ago and bought a screen thing that went in the dryer vent intending to use it in the winter to recapture the heat and moisture. The screen mesh was pretty fine, but still I got lots of dryer lint in the basement room with the dryer so I took it out. Great idea, but at least at the time it didn't work out well in practice.


Me too.
It was awful. Lint and dust everywhere.
__________________
No, not rich. I am a poor man with money, which is not the same thing"
GravitySucks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2017, 07:49 AM   #120
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 23,635
Quote:
Originally Posted by GravitySucks View Post
Dear BIL is an insurance adjuster for real estate damages. He told me lint build up is in the top ten residential fire claims.
I thought I needed to buy a new dryer but it was a clogged vent that's was causing the dryer to shut off some times. Cleaned it out and the time to dry is right back to 12 years ago. I'll have to remember to clean it again this summer.
I've read this too, and you would think insurance companies would include a reminder in their bills. I'd actually appreciate that, it's easy to forget stuff like that that is an annual thing and out of site. Maybe even provide a small discount ( $5 or something), if you log on to their web page and click acknowledging you did it (honor system would probably be good enough).

Fortunately, ours is a straight shot out the wall. I added one of those outside caps that floats up and down to allow air out but not in. If I pop that off, I can pretty much clean everything out by just reaching in with my arm. The air blast blows everything else out as long as I get any build up.

-ERD50
ERD50 is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The art of frugality rw86347 FIRE and Money 55 04-28-2008 07:06 PM
Frugality Hall Of Fame David1961 FIRE and Money 124 11-14-2007 06:20 PM
Top 10 Warning Signs You've Taken Frugality too Far........:) FinanceDude Other topics 14 02-28-2007 07:02 PM
Joe Dominguez's Wife Says Frugality Ain't So Hot intercst FIRE and Money 24 11-15-2005 09:48 PM
Frugality (and real estate) scores another win wabmester FIRE and Money 18 10-24-2005 07:15 PM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:53 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.