Early Retirement & Financial Independence Community

Early Retirement & Financial Independence Community (https://www.early-retirement.org/forums/)
-   Life after FIRE (https://www.early-retirement.org/forums/f29/)
-   -   Recommendation for Electric Smoker (https://www.early-retirement.org/forums/f29/recommendation-for-electric-smoker-104292.html)

Hopeful 12-20-2020 07:32 AM

I love my RecTeq. They have a faithful following, and their customer service is top notch.

OldShooter 12-20-2020 10:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by folivier (Post 2529754)
When I do brisket I always cut it in half so I have a thick piece and thinner piece. It avoids overcooking the thinner piece. I put my remote thermometer in the thinner piece and pull it off when that one's done then move the thermometer to the thicker piece. There can be a few hours difference in cooking time.

You are probably talking about separating the point from the flat. The flat is, well, the large flat muscle. The point is the second muscle in a brisket. It covers a little less than half the flat in a sort of hump. The two are separated by a fairly thick fat layer.

There have been some discussions lately at https://www.bbq-brethren.com about cooking the point and the flat seperately though I'm not sure a consensus emerged. I have never done it; in my experience the point does get tender faster than the flat but doesn't suffer from staying in the heat until the flat probes tender. Maybe that's the "thinner piece" for you. For brisket anatomy (and trimming techniques), youtube is your friend.

audreyh1 12-20-2020 11:33 AM

Well, being from TX I cannot imagine separating the point and the flat and smoking them separately. That just ain't right!

Bugeater 12-20-2020 11:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by audreyh1 (Post 2530437)
Well, being from TX I cannot imagine separating the point and the flat and smoking them separately. That just ain't right!

When I smoke brisket I'm primarily looking to do burnt ends so for me the point is more valued than the flat. I have found a grocery store who will sell just the point which is not a normal request as they typically sell just the flat or a full packer.

Regardless I prefer my horizontal offset versus electric, though if I wrap sometimes I will put in the electric just to save on charcoal for the last part of the smoke.

skipro33 12-20-2020 11:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by audreyh1 (Post 2530437)
Well, being from TX I cannot imagine separating the point and the flat and smoking them separately. That just ain't right!

People separate because they think the thin flat will overcook if left in while the point finishes. It doesn't and no amount of discussing will convince them. The flat is lean. The point is fat. They get 'done' at different rates. The lean needs much more time to become tender than a fatty piece of meat due to the connective tissues involved.
Also, most people won't believe that a tough, dry brisket is due to undercooking. Most will pull at 190 degrees when they need to leave it in until 206 degrees or more. The extra heat and time continues to break down the connective tissues that makes beef tough.

Now here's something that will really offend you as a Texan; foil ! Ha!
I have been known to foil the brisket at around 190 and let it continue to cook. I will sometimes add a little of the drippings back into the foil as well. Most times I won't foil the point so I get proper burnt ends of the fat.

OldShooter 12-20-2020 12:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skipro33 (Post 2530451)
... Now here's something that will really offend you as a Texan; foil ! Ha! I have been known to foil the brisket at around 190 and let it continue to cook. I will sometimes add a little of the drippings back into the foil as well. Most times I won't foil the point so I get proper burnt ends of the fat.

That's fairly common at comps. In fact there was a board-level debate at KCBS a couple of years ago about a rule that DQ'd a turn-in box if any of the judges found a tiny piece of foil in the meat. The issue was that some cooks' probes/probing was punching a little foil divot and driving it into the meat. I don't remember the outcome and I have never seen the problem as a judge, but if it happened I would just stay quiet. Some things just peg my sillymeter.

Re the practice of wrapping, there are some strong opinions (Meathead for example) to the effect that once the brisket is through the stall and the surface has dried out, it stops absorbing smoke anyway. Aaron Franklin has some TX credentials IIRC and he wraps. But for me that also means that the dry surface is sealing in juices, so I don't bother with the wrap. I have also found that wrap/no-wrap makes no difference with my ribs.

audreyh1 12-20-2020 12:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skipro33 (Post 2530451)
Now here's something that will really offend you as a Texan; foil ! Ha!
I have been known to foil the brisket at around 190 and let it continue to cook. I will sometimes add a little of the drippings back into the foil as well. Most times I won't foil the point so I get proper burnt ends of the fat.

I have used butcher paper.

old medic 01-25-2021 07:15 AM

Update on Green Mt Grills..... Customer Service

Mine started acting up. temp wouldn't get above 190, but fully cooked a 12 Lb Turkey
in about 3 hours....
I give customer service a call.... sure enough.. machine and choice of options... press 2
2nd ring Im surprised to have a real person say hello....
I explain the issue, he states its out of warrantee... But proceeds to walk me thru several steps to try and remedy the issue. very pleasant and helpful...
OUTSTANDING DOUBLE THUMBS UP

Singletrack 02-01-2021 12:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 24601NoMore (Post 2447796)
A great electric smoker is anything by Cookshack. I have their "Smokette Elite" (SM025) and it's a beast. Built like a tank, and would probably survive a nuclear holocaust. But more importantly, is a "set and forget" electric smoker. Put 2-4 oz of a good, hefty wood chunk or two in to the smoke box..set your temp. Load up the food, and insert the (included) probe so that you constantly monitor food temp........

Thanks for the Cookshack referral. Iíve been looking at pellet smokers for our new build here in Colorado, and I like the idea of being able to use small wood chunks vs. pellets. Iím going to give these serious consideration.

skipro33 02-01-2021 12:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Singletrack (Post 2553449)
Thanks for the Cookshack referral. I’ve been looking at pellet smokers for our new build here in Colorado, and I like the idea of being able to use small wood chunks vs. pellets. I’m going to give these serious consideration.

From my Cookshack, this is a 3 lb brisket flat set for 250 degrees and pulled after 8 hours with an internal temp of 205 degrees. Melt-in-your-mouth tender.
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/Vv...-no?authuser=0

Here's a link to this and the shortribs I made with them.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/5LFppunBu63TL8CM6

Singletrack 02-01-2021 12:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skipro33 (Post 2553460)
From my Cookshack, this is a 3 lb brisket flat set for 250 degrees and pulled after 8 hours with an internal temp of 205 degrees. Melt-in-your-mouth tender.
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/Vv...-no?authuser=0

Looks awesome, skipro - thanks!

24601NoMore 02-01-2021 12:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Singletrack (Post 2553449)
Thanks for the Cookshack referral. Iíve been looking at pellet smokers for our new build here in Colorado, and I like the idea of being able to use small wood chunks vs. pellets. Iím going to give these serious consideration.

No prob. Can't go wrong in my opinion with Cookshack. They're a little on the pricey end but not unreasonable as it "should" be the only smoker you ever have to buy..plus, they turn out better Queue than I can get at almost any BBQ restaurant (well, maybe short of Aaron Franklin's, but I'm not about to drive down to TX anytime soon!)

One thing to consider on wood v. pellets is cost. 2-4 oz of wood will run you .25 - .50, and a Cookshack Smokette Elite will run all day on that. I'm not an expert on pellet cost, but did read recently that a pound of pellets will last ~an hour and can run as much as $1/lb. That's a pretty big difference in cost of operation.

Here's where I get my wood..https://www.charcoalstore.com/collec...ng-wood-chunks. They have almost any kind you can imagine, all reasonably priced. I personally like the Hickory, Cherry, Apple and Bourbon Soaked Oak but just haven't tried many of the others.

audreyh1 02-03-2021 07:54 PM

Homemade bacon! OMG!

My recent post: https://www.early-retirement.org/for...ml#post2554899

INTJ10 02-05-2021 08:04 AM

I have used a Weber Smokey Mountain WSM bullet smoker for many years. It is charcoal fuel. However, I can make better brisket in my Anova Sous Vide. I cook it for about 24-30 hours with liquid smoke. Finish it in the oven for about an hour. I wouldnít have believed it until I tried it. I still prefer ribs on the WSM.

folivier 03-10-2021 07:01 AM

Anyone using a Smokin-It #1 smoker?
I'm thinking of getting a smaller electric smoker to keep at our summer place in the mountains. Not interested in a pellet grill.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:39 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.