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Gout - Who has it and how are you treating it.
Old 10-28-2012, 12:54 AM   #1
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Gout - Who has it and how are you treating it.

For those who have been suffering from Gout, how are you treating it?

Mp
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Old 10-28-2012, 01:11 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by Disappointed View Post
For those who have been suffering from Gout, how are you treating it?

Mp
I had one attack in my mid-30s. I can't remember how long before it resolved, but it never came back. And I am really glad.

Ha
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Old 10-28-2012, 02:25 AM   #3
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NSAIDS, corticosteroids for acute episode, and Allopurinol as a first line treatment for chronic gout.

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For those who have been suffering from Gout, how are you treating it?

Mp
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Old 10-28-2012, 05:58 AM   #4
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I'm sort of an expert on this.

I get a gout attack every 3 months or so for over 40 years. Tried everything. Even talked to the doc one time about cutting the toe off! (I was quite serious...he advised against it)

Indomethecin (NSAID) helps but rips up your stomach. Allopurinol makes my muscles and joints stiff so I stay away from it but a lot of people take it and it helps them...leeches the purines right out of your bones! (as such, starting on this drug will sometimes GIVE you gout as the purines start moving around.)

There is a new med called "Colcrys" which is helpful in getting rid of an episode quickly but the cure is almost a bad (sometimes worse) as the problem. Colcrys is an improvement (long story with the FDA) over the old colchicene which is a very old drug from the 1930's. Colchicene was a drug evolved from the Middle Ages...some extract of the saffron flower IIRC!

I haven't tried the new stuff advertised on TV but I'm told it's good stuff.

Over the years, I've found that even one serving of spinach or asparagus will send give me an episode. Had a spinach salad once by accident and needed a wheelchair for a week.

Too much beer or red wine will do it too (2-3 glasses for 5-6 days) but if I space the days out a bit it's ok. Hard liquor is fine.

Hope this helps!
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Old 10-28-2012, 07:11 AM   #5
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Cherries, I tried it worked for me. Also lost wieght, cut back on alcohol. several years without an episode.

http://arthritis.webmd.com/news/20101110/cherries-may-cut-risk-of-gout-flare-ups
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Old 10-28-2012, 07:43 AM   #6
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Old 10-28-2012, 07:51 AM   #7
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Had it for decades. I used NSAIDs for a while but when the attacks became frequent I switched to Allopurinol. I take Allopurinol daily with no apparent side effects and total relief from the gout. Now I am afraid to drop the Allopurinol and experiment with diet.
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Old 10-28-2012, 08:01 AM   #8
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I had read on the internet (so it must be true! ha ha) that if you are of English descent you are 5 times more likely to develop gout.

I thought eating less red meat also was a way to help alleviate gout?
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Old 10-28-2012, 09:29 AM   #9
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I have had a handful of attacks during the past ten yearsbut now it is attacking my finger joints. Indocin created a Transient Ischemic Attack condition for me, it also raised my heart rate, I could hear my heart beating when I put my head down on a pillow. I have not tried Allopurinol for fear of its side effects.

Chicken broth, chicken, duck, and turkey are some of the food that will tricker an attack. I guess anything with high uric acid is not good for gout sufferers.
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Old 10-28-2012, 09:32 AM   #10
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My husband gets it from time to time and takes the mentioned drugs when it's active. He finds cherries help. He sees a relationship between shellfish, particularly shrimp and gout attacks. The doctor advises him to lose weight, but he hasn't. He is bothered with it 1-2 x a year.
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Old 10-28-2012, 11:15 AM   #11
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No one who has ever had a gout attack, ever wants another.

The actual physical "hurt" comes from high uric acid, which creates microscopic "needles" and settles in and around joints, most commonly at the base of the big toe. In effect, it's like having crushed glass slivers in the flesh. Causes swelling redness, and is incredibly painful. Those who have had an attack commonly liken the pain to having root canal surgery without an anaesthetic. Without treatment, can last two or three days.

Common causes :Foods high in purines
Beer, other alcoholic beverages.
Anchovies, sardines in oil, fish roes, herring.
Yeast.
Organ meat (liver, kidneys, sweetbreads)
Legumes (dried beans, peas)
Meat extracts, consomme, gravies.
Mushrooms, spinach, asparagus, cauliflower.

Allopurinol is the recommended ongoing medication to prevent recurrent attacks. The NAIDS (Aspirin, Naproxen, Ibuprofen etc, help with the pain.
Colcrys, is a relatively new medication that replaces the 1400 year old remedy Colchicine... (IMO a very ugly story of sneaky Pharma manipulation that now raises the cost per pill from $.02 to $5... Google for the story and make your own judgement). As far as I can see, Colcrys is Colchicine with FDA approval.
Anyway... this is the immediate treatment for an ongoing attack. Much more effective than the NSAIDS.
.....................................
Now, my own opinion... personal experience...
Had first attack about 10 years ago... Just went to Doctor, got the Colchicine, and in 2 days was fine. The second time came a year later. Didn't know about the causes before this, but started studying. Since that time, have had one or two mild attacks, but because I had the colchicine on hand, stopped them dead overnight.
In my case, I have determined the triggers to be shellfish, and the few times I have more than one of my 4PM 2oz Dry Martinis. From talking with others with the same predeliction, different strokes for different folks... YMMV.

My thinking for anyone starting out on this adventure, is to:
#1 when you feel the initial twinges coming on... be very careful of what you eat or drink, and take lots of water, which seems to help.
#2 obtain a prescription for the Colcrys and take as directed. A second recommendation here... Ask the doctor for enough to take you through another attack. Invariably Gout comes on at night, and probably on the doctors day off.

As far as I can see, it's a matter of diet. If your annual physical includes blood tests, ask to add the "uric acid" test. That should let you know if you're a potential victim.

Normal disclaimer... Am not a doctor, and have no medical training. This is just an opinion based on personal experience, and talking with those who have been fellow sufferers. Fingers crossed, no serious attack in years... Deepest sympathy for those who are afflicted.



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Old 10-28-2012, 11:23 AM   #12
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No one who has ever had a gout attack, ever wants another.
FWIW, My thoughts.

The actual physical "hurt" comes from high uric acid, which creates microscopic "needles" and settles in and around joints, most commonly at the base of the big toe. In effect, it's like having crushed glass slivers in the flesh. Causes swelling redness, and is incredibly painful. Those who have had an attack commonly liken the pain to having root canal surgery without an anaesthetic. Without treatment, can last two or three days.

Common causes :Foods high in purines
Beer, other alcoholic beverages.
Anchovies, sardines in oil, fish roes, herring.
Yeast.
Organ meat (liver, kidneys, sweetbreads)
Legumes (dried beans, peas)
Meat extracts, consomme, gravies.
Mushrooms, spinach, asparagus, cauliflower.

Allopurinol is the recommended ongoing medication to prevent recurrent attacks. The NAIDS (Aspirin, Naproxen, Ibuprofen etc, help with the pain.
Colcrys, is a relatively new medication that replaces the 1400 year old remedy Colchicine... (IMO a very ugly story of sneaky Pharma manipulation that now raises the cost per pill from $.30 to $6... Make your own judgement). Spotlight on Colchicine: The Colcrys Controversy - General Medicine Pushes annual treatment costs from under $25 to $1800 -$3600.

As far as I can see, Colcrys is Colchicine with FDA approval.
Anyway... this is the immediate treatment for an ongoing attack. Much more effective than the NSAIDS. Causes stomach distress and diarrhea, but beats the pain.
.....................................
Now, my own opinion... personal experience...
Had first attack about 10 years ago... Just went to Doctor, got the Colchicine, and in 2 days was fine. The second time came a year later. Didn't know about the causes before this, but started studying. Since that time, have had one or two mild attacks, but because I had the colchicine on hand, stopped them dead overnight.
In my case, I have determined the triggers to be shellfish, and the few times I have more than one of my 4PM 2oz Dry Martinis. From talking with others with the same predeliction, different strokes for different folks... YMMV.

My thinking for anyone starting out on this adventure, is to:
#1 when you feel the initial twinges coming on... be very careful of what you eat or drink, and take lots of water, which seems to help.
#2 obtain a prescription for the Colcrys and take as directed. A second recommendation here... Ask the doctor for enough to take you through another attack. Invariably Gout comes on at night, and probably on the doctors day off.

As far as I can see, it's a matter of diet. If your annual physical includes blood tests, ask to add the "uric acid" test. That should let you know if you're a potential victim.

Normal disclaimer... Am not a doctor, and have no medical training. This is just an opinion based on personal experience, and talking with those who have been fellow sufferers. Fingers crossed, no serious attack in years... Deepest sympathy for those who are afflicted.



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Old 10-28-2012, 11:33 AM   #13
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I had read on the internet (so it must be true! ha ha) that if you are of English descent you are 5 times more likely to develop gout.
I never knew anyone with gout before we moved to the US so this statement obviously piqued my curiosity as it was always seen apocryphally in the UK as a disease of the wealthy.

It sounds very painful and I hope we manage to avoid ever getting it.

Gout | Arthritis Research UK

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Gout affects 1.4 per cent of adults in the UK. It's more common in men, although some women can be affected.
Prevalence of gout and hyperuricemia in the ... [Arthritis Rheum. 2011] - PubMed - NCBI

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The prevalence of gout among US adults in 2007-2008 was 3.9% (8.3 million individuals). The prevalence among men was 5.9% (6.1 million), and the prevalence among women was 2.0% (2.2 million).
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Old 10-28-2012, 11:45 AM   #14
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MIL had gout appear as a (listed) side effect of a prescribed blood pressure drug - take away: if gout appears see if you have had a recent drug change and look into listed possible side effects.

As mentioned above, cherry helped symptoms; specifically, black cherry extract. A change of drug got rid of the gout.
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Old 10-28-2012, 01:36 PM   #15
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I have a friend who goes through a period of gout attacks every year around the December holiday season. He is convinced that it's due to eating too much venison. He always gets at least one deer each year, and eats his fill for a while (can't blame him; I love venison too). After a few weeks of mostly venison, the gout comes along, and keeps coming until a couple of months have gone by to flush his system out.
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