Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-19-2012, 02:38 AM   #61
Recycles dryer sheets
JonnyM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Modesto
Posts: 334
Send a message via AIM to JonnyM Send a message via Yahoo to JonnyM
Freedom!

retired in 2006 at age 50
__________________

__________________
It's about the music
JonnyM is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 08-19-2012, 08:23 AM   #62
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Alberta/Ontario/ Arizona
Posts: 3,152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckanut

good fortune? Perhaps partly. But, I'll bet if you look back on the last 20-30 years you made a lot of decisions to end up with that pension, you gave up things, you skipped certain "opportunities", you deferred gratification, etc. Many people could have done the same, but they chose not to do so.
I agree with your sentiment, but I find the idea that we are mostly lucky makes us a little more humble and easier to be around. "I have been very fortunate" is easier for others to deal with than "I am so smart/good planner//hard worker,etc." We will still know the truth.
__________________

__________________
Danmar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2012, 08:43 PM   #63
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 355
I kept the job that paid the most, with the best retirement benefits. From the start, it was obvious that I only needed to stay there until I could afford to retire. I'm embarrassed about how long I had to stay, but early retirement has been the best years of my life.
__________________
heyyou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2012, 08:51 PM   #64
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 1,575
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckanut View Post
good fortune? Perhaps partly. But, I'll bet if you look back on the last 20-30 years you made a lot of decisions to end up with that pension, you gave up things, you skipped certain "opportunities", you deferred gratification, etc. Many people could have done the same, but they chose not to do so.
+1

While luck certainly plays a role, all the good fortune in the world is unlikely to help most of us if we don't make a fair number of good decisons along the road to ER.
__________________
Budgeting is a skill practised by people who are bad at politics.
traineeinvestor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2012, 09:06 PM   #65
Full time employment: Posting here.
ohyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 649
DH and mine was mostly luck. I read the Fire & Money posts and wish i knew half as much as these folks learned. I just never realized. (sigh, but oh well)

The only semi-smart things we did were start 403b's and keep expenses (esp. mortgage) below what the bank told us we could afford.

However we arrive at retirement, more power to all of us. It is so sweet.
__________________
ohyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Deciding Factor: Time or Money?
Old 02-28-2013, 06:54 PM   #66
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Suburban Woods in Ohio
Posts: 503
Deciding Factor: Time or Money?

Retiring last June, at 59, came about 4 years earlier than expected.

I'd made the "economically unfeasible" choices in college: majored in English without wanting to go to law school. Then became a teacher out of sheer altruism, motivation, perspiration and the (naive) hope that I might make the world a better place (if I could help teenagers learn to read critically and deeply, write fluently and honestly, and think logically and globally.) Thirty-seven years later, I've only rarely regretted the choice, usually when grading essays on nights, weekends, Christmas, and every spring break. I even took 2 years off to earn another "impractical" degree (an MA in English and American Lit.).

I was lucky enough to marry a great guy with degrees in chemistry, biology and theology. After feeling cloistered as a pastor, he wanted to work out in the "regular world." So he got a job in pharmaceutical sales, from which he retired after many successful years. (Read: he made a lot more $ than I did.)

There have been major challenges throughout our marriage (losing a child, adopting another one who developed mental illness, then my husband developed serious COPD about 28 years ago.........and he had never smoked); for sanity's sake, I spent most of my career only working part-time. So I never built up as much service credit as I would need. However, we have been frugal and responsible in saving for retirement. I also knew that, by working until 63, I could provide for myself the highest possible teacher's pension.

But, a year ago, we learned that my husband's lungs had deteriorated to the point that he functions on only 20% breathing capacity. He decided to take disability retirement at 62. My quandary was this: do I work another 4 years to improve my pension? or do I retire with less and, thus, "buy" those four years with my husband instead?

In effect, did I want extra time with my husband? or another year of paychecks?

I chose the husband, and have not regretted it for a moment. We did all the careful math and-- because of our pensions, 30 yrs. of LBYM, and our taste for a simple life-- all has worked out just fine. We can read and discuss all the books we want. We volunteer, go to the park, drink coffee any time in the AM, visit friends whenever we like. Many precious enjoyments are free.

Henry David Thoreau mourned those who live their lives in "quiet desperation." So he went to the woods to "live deliberately." So might each of us, whether we live near the woods or not.

Or, as Whitman says in "Song of Myself," "I loaf and invite my soul."

The best of life, IMHO, lies beyond the paychecks and politics of a career. Don't get me wrong: I loved mine. But there came a point when I wanted as much time with my husband as possible!
__________________
LitGal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2013, 07:04 PM   #67
Full time employment: Posting here.
Moscyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 728
Litgal, thank you for sharing such a touching piece. Wishing you more wonderful and enjoyable years. Enjoy your retirement!
__________________
Moscyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2013, 07:08 PM   #68
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Lsbcal's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: west coast, hi there!
Posts: 5,686
Quote:
Originally Posted by LitGal View Post
...(snip)...
The best of life, IMHO, lies beyond the paychecks and politics of a career. Don't get me wrong: I loved mine. But there came a point when I wanted as much time with my husband as possible!
Sounds like you made the right choices for you in life. In ER you can enjoy the benefits having a literature background too. Think of all those novels to read and analyze. Good luck!
__________________
Lsbcal is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2013, 08:23 PM   #69
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,629
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moscyn View Post
Litgal, thank you for sharing such a touching piece. Wishing you more wonderful and enjoyable years. Enjoy your retirement!
+1,000,000!!!

You truly appreciate the value of time vs $.
__________________

__________________
ERhoosier is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
early retirement, retirement


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:13 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.